art by Jake Johnson

Theoryland Resources

WoT Interview Search

Search the most comprehensive database of interviews and book signings from Robert Jordan, Brandon Sanderson and the rest of Team Jordan.

Wheel of Time News

An Hour With Harriet

2012-04-30: I had the great pleasure of speaking with Harriet McDougal Rigney about her life. She's an amazing talent and person and it will take you less than an hour to agree.

The Bell Tolls

2012-04-24: Some thoughts I had during JordanCon4 and the upcoming conclusion of "The Wheel of Time."

Theoryland Community

Members: 7611

Logged In (0):

Newest Members:johnroserking, petermorris, johnadanbvv, AndrewHB, jofwu, Salemcat1, Dhakatimesnews, amazingz, Sasooner, Hasib123,

Theoryland Tweets

WoT Interview Search

Home | Interview Database

Your search for the tag 'a crown of swords' yielded 34 results

  • 1

    Interview: Oct 17th, 1994

    Daniel Rouk

    I asked how far along he is [with A Crown of Swords].

    Robert Jordan

    Jordan said he didn't really know, as he is constantly writing and cutting parts. He writes from the beginning of the story to the end, and then cuts and edits large chunks, pulling together threads. He doesn't even think about a working title, but lets the story determine it.

    He says there will be at least three more books, maybe four.

    Jordan knows the very last part of the final book, but doesn't know how long it will be till he'll put it in.

    One humorous story mentions the quote saying he will continue writing until the day the nails are put into his coffin. One elderly lady apparently told him that she was a lot closer to that than he was so he had better hurry up.

    Tags

  • 2

    Interview: Oct 17th, 1994

    Question

    What's the title of the next book?

    Robert Jordan

    Haven't decided.

    Tags

  • 3

    Interview: 2010

    Matt Williams (8 November 2010)

    Was the fog in A Crown of Swords during the fight between Toram Riatin and Rand a bubble of evil or did Fain control the fog?

    Brandon Sanderson (8 November 2010)

    RAFO.

    Footnote

    The glossary entry for Daved Hanlon in TPOD says that it was a bubble of evil.

    Tags

  • 4

    Interview: Jun 27th, 1996

    AOL Chat 2 (Verbatim)

    JVoegele

    Mr. Jordan. were you rushed by publisher deadlines?

    Robert Jordan

    In a way. Not with the last book, certainly but The Eye of the World took four years to write. Each of the other books took 13 or 14 months but the publisher brought out the second book 10 months after the first and the following books at 12-month intervals. You can see there's a law of diminishing returns there. For this last book, I simply told them I could not do it again. A Crown of Swords took about 20 months to write, in fact. That's why the book didn't come out last fall or earlier in the spring.

    Tags

  • 5

    Interview: Jun 21st, 1996

    Robert Jordan

    A Crown of Swords only covered a week because a lot of important things needed to happen in a very short time span. The development of the heroes' characters is some of the important events he wanted to accomplish.

    Tags

  • 6

    Interview: Jun 26th, 1996

    Compuserve Chat (Verbatim)

    D. John Witherspoon

    In the first five books, the pace of the story, switching between character situations and the action in general was high speed and covered significant periods of time. In Lord of Chaos, the story seemed to slow. Was this intentional or only my perception?

    Robert Jordan

    It covered a shorter period of time, but in Lord of Chaos and A Crown of Swords there were a great many things that happen in a short time that made it necessary to have the books, if not slower paced from the reader's point of view, slower as far as the chronology is concerned.

    Tags

  • 7

    Interview: Jun 26th, 1996

    Compuserve Chat (Verbatim)

    Hopper

    Speaking of book signings, is there a tour in the works? If so, when?

    Robert Jordan

    Not for A Crown of Swords per se. There is a tour in the fall, I don't know exactly when, for the reprinting of some of my historical novels. It looks as though that will be expanded to include some areas where I normally wouldn't appear for those, to make it a partial tour for A Crown of Swords. The Tor Books website will give details (and so will Book Preview).

    Tags

  • 8

    Interview: Jun 26th, 1996

    Compuserve Chat (Verbatim)

    Jim Porter

    Congratulations on A Crown of Swords. It is a wonderful read. Do you find the extra several months you took to write it contributed to the overall readability of the book and actually made it shorter in length?

    Robert Jordan

    Possibly. It was actually a good bit more in time. With the exception of The Eye of the World, which took four years to write, each of these books has taken me somewhere on the order of thirteen or fourteen months. A Crown of Swords took twenty months. There were several things I had to work out. Too much was happening and the book would have been too long. I had to work to cut things out—and that's not as easy as it sounds.

    Tags

  • 9

    Interview: Jun 27th, 1996

    AOL Chat 1 (Verbatim)

    Shosh001

    Mr. Jordan, can you tell us why Tor is sending you on tour for the Fallon series later this year, but not for A Crown of Swords?

    Robert Jordan

    Well, it was a very short time between handing in A Crown of Swords and its publication, and in fact, they weren't really sure when I'd finish so they couldn't make arrangements in advance. There's a possibility that the Fallon tour may be extended to encompass some of what we call A Crown of Swords territory.

    Tags

  • 10

    Interview: Jun 27th, 1996

    AOL Chat 1 (Verbatim)

    JJVORSmith

    My wife wonders why you left all the plot threads hanging at the end of A Crown of Swords. I have felt that A Crown of Swords is more like the middle of a book rather than a complete book by itself. Could you explain how you pace and structure your books in the Wheel of Time?

    Robert Jordan

    Not inside the time we have for this interview! :) As with all of the books, there are some plot elements hanging and some resolved. In some, there are more plot elements tied up than others; some, fewer. It just depends on how the story line is running in that particular book.

    Tags

  • 11

    Interview: Oct 9th, 1996

    Question

    Who was the one who is no more? The innkeeper or the guy on the barrel?

    Robert Jordan

    [an amused look] RAFO.

    QUESTION

    Is the innkeeper an ex-Aes Sedai?

    ROBERT JORDAN

    RAFO.

    Footnote

    This refers to a dream shared by Amys, Melaine, and Bair referenced in Lord of Chaos. We get a clue in The Path of Daggers that Setalle Anan was Martine Janata—an Aes Sedai who burned out while studying ter'angreal—and it's near-confirmed in Knife of Dreams when Setalle takes a particular interest in Mat's medallion. Thus she was 'the one who is no longer [Aes Sedai]', and she was the key to finding the Bowl. The guy on the barrel was Jain Farstrider (Noal Charin).

    Tags

  • 12

    Interview: Oct 9th, 1996

    Greebs

    Ask what the deal is with Nynaeve being able to hold half the power as ten sisters with a sa'angreal but not being able to handle two pussy little Black Ajah by herself.

    Robert Jordan

    Some people have shielding talents.

    QUESTION (LATER)

    This is similar to Greebs' question, but from a slightly different angle: How much stronger do you have to be to forcibly shield someone else who is already holding the One Power? Is it different for men than for women, or for heterosexual shielding? If the answer is only a little stronger, then ask him how come Nynaeve couldn't shield Elayne in A Crown of Swords, Chapter 21 (Swovan Night)? Also, how much weaker can you be and still be able to hold a shield on someone, Berowin excepted?

    ROBERT JORDAN

    He did not use a "real scale" for One Power stuff. You just have to be stronger. Mostly handwaving. Consider the Kin. The woman who is very weak but has a real Talent for shielding.

    FOOTNOTE—TEREZ

    On the second answer: RJ indicated in Sweden in 1995 that he does use a 21-graded scale to keep track of channeler strength.

    The first answer appears to be an Aes Sedai answer (avoiding the question). The real answer (at least, the answer that is consistent with the rest of the books) is that RJ probably used a bit of hyperbole in the scene where Mat was Healed in The Dragon Reborn (or rather, Nynaeve did, and she even caught herself...but RJ wrote it in such a way that left room for doubt whether she was amazed at her arrogance or at her potential strength).

    The woman with the shielding talent, at least as far as we were shown in A Crown of Swords, was in the Kin (Berowin), and not one of those holding Nynaeve when they went after the Bowl (Falion, who got away, and Ispan, whom they captured). They were linked, and they waited until Elayne went upstairs with most of the Kin, then caught Nynaeve off-guard while she wasn't already holding the Power, and they (rightly) believed the remaining Kin wouldn't interfere. (Erica noted when I interrogated her about this report that these were all quick questions which he answered while signing books, so he was probably too distracted to explain properly—all indications are that he truly enjoyed explaining such things when he had the leisure to do so, and that he also would have gladly admitted to the hyperbole so long as he had time to address the rest.)

    I think one of RJ's main points in that scene was that Mat, not being able to see the weaves, wouldn't have any idea what was going on, and therefore neither should we, really. RJ even called our attention to this phenomenon in the battle between Moghedien and Nynaeve at the end of The Shadow Rising:

    "A man who came in then, or any woman unable to channel, would have seen only two women facing each other across the white silk rope from a distance of less than ten feet. Two women staring at one another in a vast hall full of strange things. They would have seen nothing to say it was a duel. No leaping about and hacking with swords as men would do, nothing smashed or broken. Just two women standing there. But a duel all the same, and maybe to the death."

    The scene in A Crown of Swords was a way of exploring that phenomenon. Presumably Nynaeve was strong enough to break the shield, but it was close enough that it came to a fight much like the Moghedien fight. Meanwhile, Nynaeve says aloud that Falion and Ispan are linked, and she chastises the Kin for not helping her. That tells us all we need to know.

    Tags

  • 13

    Interview: Oct 9th, 1996

    Question

    Could a second person have "needed" the Bowl and found it?

    Robert Jordan

    Maybe. [They] didn't think of it.

    QUESTION

    Could they have "needed" the box enclosing the Bowl?

    ROBERT JORDAN

    Probably not. They wouldn't be able to convince themselves to "need" it.

    Tags

  • 14

    Interview: Jan 14th, 1997

    Thomas Howard

    Why did Mat think that someone was "holding" the True Source when his medallion grew cold? (That is I thought it only did this when he came in contact with an actual flow. This occurred on page 595 of A Crown of Swords, for reference.)

    I'm going to quote the whole response again.

    Robert Jordan

    "Mat's medallion gets icy cold if someone directs the One Power at him, but it would be cool if the Power was being used near him, and almost cold if it were being used very near him."

    Tags

  • 15

    Interview: Jan 14th, 1997

    Thomas Howard

    Would you please state for the record that Rand's helper at the end (of A Crown of Swords) was not Lews Therin?

    Robert Jordan

    To quote (and God do I like to hear this): "Lews Therin Telamon is dead, not walking around Shadar Logoth."

    THOMAS HOWARD

    I'm quite sure it's a safe assumption that he isn't walking around anywhere else either.

    Footnote

    Rand's 'helper' in Shadar Logoth in A Crown of Swords Chapter 41 was Moridin.

    Tags

  • 16

    Interview: Oct 19th, 1998

    Nansen from Ithaca, NY

    Hi, Mr. Jordan! I love your books! I have both the hardcover and paperback editions of all the Wheel of Time books. Can you please tell us why the cover to the paperback edition of A Crown of Swords is different from the hardcover? Thanks!

    Robert Jordan

    I'm afraid that was purely a marketing decision. Tor Books felt that there were stores and outlets that would not accept a fantasy cover. And they seemed to have been right.

    Tags

  • 17

    Interview: Oct 24th, 1998

    Chris Mullins

    I asked RJ, at the Palo Alto signing, if Moghedien was raped by Shadar Haran in A Crown of Swords.

    Robert Jordan

    His reply was, "Yes. Amongst other things."

    Tags

  • 18

    Interview: Oct 29th, 1998

    Robert Jordan

    As the line was drying up, the crowd apparently consisted mainly of several booksellers. They got talking about first edition printings of the hardcovers for The Eye of the World. Jordan said that he has a whole box of them at home, and that he should give the bunch of them to his son, so he can finance all his children's college educations... At a later time, he said that he heard recently from a used fantasy dealer that an unsigned first printing The Eye of the World was sold from his store for $700 dollars. RJ said he had heard of prices around $300, but not that high. He also said he heard of first printing Lord of Chaos's going at $55, which he seemed to think was absurd, since well over 200,000 had been printed. They also commented that at times, the hardcovers have been hard to find, but not because they had been out of print, but because "sensible" people assumed they would be out of print. He said that his books "break the rules", in that hardcovers aren't supposed to stay in print for 8-9 years. He also said that at one point, a computer "glitch" resulted in stores remaindering The Shadow Rising while there was still a high demand for it at the normal price (10,000 sales annually without any advertising). Someone else mentioned that they had been to a bookstore recently which had the hardcover A Crown of Swords both for sale at the regular price and on the remaindering table. Jordan expressed significant disgust with screw-ups of this sort.

    Tags

  • 19

    Interview: Nov 1st, 1998

    SciFi.com Chat (Verbatim)

    Gangorn

    Why have you changed your writing style for the past two books?

    Robert Jordan

    I haven't. The last two books are more concentrated in time than the previous books, but since the first book, there has been a narrowing of the time frame. So that by A Crown Of Swords, the book covered only about eleven days and we're now beginning to widen out again.

    Tags

  • 20

    Interview: Aug 30th, 1999

    Question

    Do you know what the title of your next book is?

    Robert Jordan

    No, I won't until probably I'm close to the end. Sometimes it is the last bit of the book, something I've written in the last bit of the book. And a couple of times... A Crown of Swords. As soon as I knew I was able to put the Laurel Crown, Rand assuming the Laurel Crown in that book, I knew that that book was going to be called A Crown of Swords. But most of the time I'm at least halfway through it.

    Tags

  • 21

    Interview: Mar, 2000

    Robert Jordan

    The first book took four years. The next five books took, on average, 14 months. I finished Lord of Chaos in August 1994, handed the manuscript in, and in October, two months later, I was on tour for that book. I came back and said, 'There isn't time. I cannot write a book for you in time for you to publish it next fall.' I convinced them I couldn't do it, and it's lucky I did, because it turned out A Crown of Swords took almost two years, and so did The Path of Daggers.

    Tags

  • 22

    Interview: Dec 12th, 2000

    CNN Chat (Verbatim)

    Arsolos

    It has been reported that you have confirmed that Sammael died at the end of A Crown of Swords. Could you confirm that you have said this and elaborate on whether Rand was correct?

    Robert Jordan

    Mashadar killed Sammael. Sammael is toast!

    Tags

  • 23

    Interview: Jan 16th, 2003

    Question

    When Rand went to see the rebels in A Crown of Swords, and Fain was there, why didn't Rand just waste him and gate out of there?

    Robert Jordan

    When Rand visits the rebels, he has a specific goal in mind. He's just been to see the Sea Folk, and things have gone his way there, so he's going to see what the Dragon Reborn can do about the rebels. Killing an advisor and Traveling away is not going to help him accomplish his goals. He's not a fool.

    Tags

  • 24

    Interview: Jan 16th, 2003

    Michael Martin

    Why didn't Rand kill Padan Fain when he spotted him at the rebels' camp in A Crown of Swords?

    Robert Jordan

    Rand was there to reach out to the rebels, and killing Fain would not have been productive, and Rand is not a fool. (I had to stifle quite a few comments at that answer.)

    Tags

  • 25

    Interview: Mar 6th, 2008

    Brandon Sanderson

    I have finished The Path of Daggers, but I still haven't done a blog post on A Crown of Swords, so we'll do that one first.

    One of the things I went into this series wondering was if I could pick out why some readers grew frustrated with the series around books seven and eight. I went into this book during this particular read-through expecting it to be one of the weaker ones in the series, and yet, I found it to be one of my favorites.

    Those of you who read my initial Dragonmount interview will recall that the scene in this book where Nynaeve overcomes her Block at the bottom of the river, while Lan races to save her, is one of my very favorite in the entire series. I felt that the foreshadowing of the events here worked perfectly, and the character growth for Nynaeve over the last few books has continued to grow her as one of my favorite (if not my very favorite) viewpoints to read.

    Rand's character progression is also deftly handled, though he is going the other direction, in many ways. He is becoming harder and harder as he suffers more and more (the beatings in the last book didn't help either.) Part of me wonders if this character progression, which I find marvelously done, is part of what drove readers to complain about these later books. If that is the case, then they are missing one of the great aspects of the series, in my opinion. Rand is particularly heroic in how he faces so many difficult challenges, being beaten up physically and mentally, yet continues on despite it and even retains a large measure of his inner nobility.

    I object to complaints about pacing. I thing the pacing across the series has been even, and I certainly didn't find this book to be any slower than previous volumes. However, perhaps that's because I'm able to read these all through without any wait in-between. One thing that is happening is that as the series grows longer, the viewpoints per character grow less and less frequent. There are enough main characters with important plots that we can't spend an entire book focusing on just two or three of them like we did during the early books.

    This series, as I've said before, is meant to be read straight through. I think, perhaps, that waiting two years for this book and then only getting a tiny slice of the overall story might be what caused complaints from readers. It's not that the writing quality went down (I think it goes up as the series continues) or that the pacing grew slower. I think that the problem is readers not grasping the entire vision of the story, which is difficult to do when you don't know how many books there will be or how long it will be until they are done.

    I point as a counterweight to these complaints that when you CAN read the entire series straight through, the viewpoints work so well together that the books become an even greater masterpiece. The story is so complex and interconnected that you can often get your payoffs chapters and chapters away from the places where they are introduced. But they're all the more sweet for the complexity and delicate touch.

    Anyway, that's all I can really say here, as this one and The Path of Daggers are quite well blended together in my head now. (As I think they were meant to be.) I'm on to Book Nine tomorrow. I should begin work on Book Twelve before the end of the month at this rate.

    Tags

  • 26

    Interview: Oct 21st, 1994

    AOL Chat 2 (Verbatim)

    Question

    When will your next book be out?

    Robert Jordan

    In a year, if everything goes all right.

    Tags

  • 27

    Interview: Nov 11th, 2009

    Question

    It's pretty clear now that Moridin and Rand are linked because of the balefire incident. Since Rand used saidin to create the balefire, and now he gets sick when channeling saidin, does that mean Moridin gets sick when he tries to use the True Power?

    Brandon Sanderson

    You're assuming that Rand's channeling sickness comes from crossing the streams.

    Footnote

    From Knife of Dreams Chapter 21, "Within the Stone":

    The face of the man from Shadar Logoth floated in his head for a moment. He looked furious. And near to sicking up.

    Tags

  • 28

    Interview: Nov 17th, 2009

    Question

    Does Mat's medallion work against all types of Power, or just against saidar? Because you know he said in the book, something to be free of Aes Sedai.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes, that is what he said specifically, but you know, Aes Sedai were both male and female once, and so we don't know yet, and I will have to RAFO that.

    Another person from audience

    But that was in book six.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Was it in book six?

    Audience

    Yeah, that's where Aran'gar gets him with a weave.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Oh, that's right; it did happen. You see, I know a lot of stuff....but I get in trouble if I say too much, because at one of the early signings....no, it wasn't even one of the signings; it was JordanCon. I was talking about....someone asked me a question, and I started answering, talking about, 'Do you remember that scene, where this happened, and this happened, and this happened....' and everyone started staring at me blankly. And I'm like, 'What? No...' and I argued with them that this scene existed. I promised them. No one remembered it! And about a month later, I realized as I was looking through it, 'Oh, it was a deleted scene from book seven.' Which now, in my head, is in book seven! And so I'm very careful not saying things I know, but you're right; that was proven in the books.

    Tags

  • 29

    Interview: Apr 17th, 2011

    Terez

    Will the fat man turn up again?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Um...I hope you're not talking about me.

    Terez

    Um...(cracks up) [This made me laugh mostly because I had just noticed that Brandon seems to have shed quite a few pounds, no doubt because his wife occasionally reminds him that he owes it to his fans to stay in shape.]

    Brandon Sanderson

    I hope you're talking about the angreal! Um...I've always had an affection for that little fat man angreal.

    Terez

    (pause) That's a good answer.

    Tags

  • 30

    Interview: Oct 17th, 1994

    Robert Jordan

    RJ refused to give hints about the next book.

    RJ was also surprised that the books were as successful as they turned out to be.

    Tags

  • 31

    Interview: Apr 5th, 1996

    Bill Garrett

    A Reading from A Crown of Swords

    Warning: Minor Spoilers for A Crown of Swords

    Robert Jordan

    Robert Jordan read part of a chapter from A Crown of Swords. I don't have an exact measure of the length, but I'd estimate it at about 1200 words given the duration and pace of his reading. It sounded like one of those sections in a chapter that covers scenes from different characters' points of view. The scene features Mat with a "here's where he is now" theme, sort of like the scene in Lord of Chaos where Mat dances with a tavern wench. The passage is fairly funny; during the reading, the audience erupted into laughter several times.

    In the scene we find Mat at Queen Tylin's palace in Ebou Dar. Mat is turned off by the cloying opulence of his rooms. He's apparently been accorded status as a ranking diplomat from a friendly nation. He's also accorded some personal status with the Queen, we find out... Tylin pays him a visit and jumps all over him. Mat tries to fend her off (he's really scared by the prospect of a woman pursuing him) but to little avail; she paws him like an octopus and manages to relieve him of a few articles of restrictive clothing. Thom and Juilin save the day with a well-timed knock at the door to Mat's chambers.

    Thom, Juilin, and Mat discuss how they're going to manage to keep Elayne and Nynaeve protected and out of trouble. They develop a list of demands to give to the two women. When Elayne and Nyaneve arrive, the men present their concerns... and the women agree, completely! Mat, Juilin, and Thom know that trouble's on the way.

    Tags

  • 32

    Interview: Nov 2nd, 2010

    Aidan Moher

    One of the perks associated with finishing The Wheel of Time is that you've read all of Robert Jordan's notes. Now that you know all the secrets (including stuff that won't even appear in the novels), how has your appreciation for the series changed?

    Brandon Sanderson

    It's been an interesting experience. So far as I know, I'm the only person in the world to have ever read through—beginning to end—the Wheel of Time, starting with Book One and continuing through until I reached the final scenes Robert Jordan wrote before he passed away. (Maria might have done it, but I don't think so—she pretty much has the books memorized by now, and seems to spot-read more than she reads straight through.)

    This is an experience others will start having in the coming years, and perhaps they'll agree with me that it DOES change the series. First off, you gain a better appreciation for Robert Jordan's ability to foreshadow. Second, the slow parts don't seem so slow any longer, particularly as you see books seven through fourteen as being one large novel.

    Tags

  • 33

    Interview: Apr 20th, 2013

    Terez

    Who had Herid Fel killed?

    Maria Simons

    That was A Crown of Swords right?

    Terez

    It was in the epilogue of Lord of Chaos. They found out about it in A Crown of Swords. And it was the gholam. So it had to be—

    Maria Simons

    Sammael, yeah. That was Sammael.

    Terez

    Do you know the reason?

    Maria Simons

    Because he somehow learned that Fel was helping Rand and didn't want the information...?

    Terez

    A friend of mine has a theory; he believed that Herid Fel was Asmodean in disguise, because he didn't believe Asmodean was dead.

    Maria Simons

    That's a good theory! I like that theory.

    Terez

    I like it too! Because it would explain a lot... (including why a gholam was sent to kill a non-channeler)

    Maria Simons

    Yeah.

    Tags