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Your search for the tag 'bwb' yielded 54 results

  • 1

    Interview: Oct 21st, 1994

    AOL Chat 1 (Verbatim)

    Pamela

    After reading the first five books (thanks for many wonderful hours) and starting the sixth, I find myself wishing for a "Wheel of Time Encyclopedia"—something with longer glossary entries to help me remember who's who and who's done what. Any chance of that happening?

    Robert Jordan

    An Encyclopedia will have to wait until the Wheel of Time is finished, but the guys who did The Illustrated Guide to Pern and The Illustrated Guide to Amber are interviewing me next month for the same sort of book about the Wheel.

    Tags

  • 2

    Interview: Oct 20th, 1994

    Robert Jordan

    Jordan discussed several spin-offs from the books. He mentioned an "Illustrated Guide the Wheel of Time" (like the one they did for Pern). When asked about Role Playing Games he said he was in contact with Wizards of the Coast (makers of the popular Magic card game. Are we in for Daes Dae'mar: the Deckmaster Game of Games?), and he was approached with an offer for an AD&D [Advanced Dungeons and Dragons] module (this raises interesting questions). The term "module" has been replaced by "adventure" and "supplement". Did Jordan dabble in RPGs ten years ago and preserve obsolete terms, or was he approached by an old time TSR [creators of Dungeons and Dragons] rep who lapsed into the "old tongue"? Also, was the word used to mean an adventure (the most common use of module) or a full world like Darksun or Forgotten Realms?

    Tags

  • 3

    Interview: Oct 22nd, 1994

    Roxanne

    Now for the major announcement (and they specifically said we could blab):

    Jody Lynn Nye, Todd Cameron Hamilton, et. al., are hard at work on a compendium, "Guide to the Wheel of Time." They have already produced the well-regarded books, "Guide to Pern" and "Guide to Xanth." Todd was at the signing but left early; Jody's husband (Bill Fawcett) arrived quite late and stayed after (which is where we learned this little tidbit).

    The Guide to the Wheel of Time is scheduled to be released with the paperback of Lord of Chaos sometime next fall. We will of course have it!

    Tags

    bwb,
  • 4

    Interview: 2011

    Twitter 2011 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Darth Andrea (6 January 2011)

    Quick question, From RJ's Notes on Callandor, is it a straight bladed sword, or curved, single handed or hand and a half?

    Brandon Sanderson (6 January 2011)

    MAFO.

    FELIX PAX

    BWB claims Callandor is, "a crystal sword with a curved blade...." http://bit.ly/hiKltk

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Thanks, Felix. That's how I imagined it, but with things like this, I can't always rely on my memory.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Sometimes, I have incorrect biases come from years of reading and imagining.

    Tags

  • 5

    Interview: 2011

    Twitter 2011 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Austin Moore (6 January 2011)

    Who was the Lord of Chaos that Demandred and Taim both mention? There has been tons of debate.

    Brandon Sanderson (6 January 2011)

    Really? I thought that one was obvious. What's the debate about?

    Terez

    It's Rand. Look in the BWB re: Feast of Fools.

    Austin Moore

    Why was Demandred and Taim saying, "Let the Lord of Chaos rule" if it was Rand? Sorry just read through series once so far :(

    Terez

    Here's a quote for you:

    The Feast of Fools
    Celebrated in Tammaz (in Arad Doman and the Borderlands) or Saven (everywhere else), the exact day varying according to locality. A day in which all order is deliberately inverted; the high perform lowly tasks (running errands, serving at table, etc.) while the low do no work and give orders to their usual superiors. In many villages and towns the most foolish person is given a title such as the Lord/Lady of Unreason/Misrule/Chaos or the King/Queen of Fools. Not an honor sought, but for that one day everyone has to obey whatever orders, however foolish, are given by the chosen one. (Called the Festival of Unreason in Saldaea; the Festival of Fools in Kandor; Foolday in Baerlon and the Two Rivers.)

    Matt Hatch

    I've always enjoyed this theory about the Lord of Chaos. It's fun.

    Brandon Sanderson

    That is a good theory for people to be reading.

    Terez

    YAY. OMG, that theory has been on the rocks for years because of contradicting tour reports.

    Terez

    Also, your tour quotes were vague enough to allow it but most people didn't see it that way.

    Brandon Sanderson

    I didn't say the theory was true, just that you should study it. :) But I would like to see those tour reports.

    Terez

    Yes, yes. :) Also, your vague(ish) wording. And the contradicting RJ reports.

    Footnote

    Adding to Brandon's implications here is Sorilea's comment in reference to the balefiring of Natrin's Barrow, in The Gathering Storm Chapter 27: "We felt the world warping from here, but did not know what had caused it. We assumed it to be the Dark One's work." (Similar to the ripples Perrin and Faile experienced in Knife of Dreams.) This opens up the possibility that people have no idea really what they're talking about when they assume that the warping of reality is due to the Dark One's touch, just as Alviarin had no idea what she was talking about when she assumed that the rotting food was the Dark One's touch (Knife of Dreams, Prologue).

    Tags

  • 6

    Interview: Jun 17th, 1995

    Robert Jordan

    On the question on how he could keep track of every person, culture, nation, etc., Robert Jordan answered that he had a file for every person, nation, city, culture, etc., describing it. In the case of persons, traumatic experiences, origin, favorite foods and colors, family, education, etc., is stored. Every person that appears several times, or has the chance to appear several times has a such file. Similar information is stored on the other entities. This information is used to flesh out the characters etc. and make them three-dimensional before the book itself is written.

    Part of this information is going to be given in the Guide to the WoT books that is going to be published this autumn, but far from everything.

    Tags

  • 7

    Interview: May, 1995

    Robert Jordan

    Wait till the Guide to The Wheel is out and check a copy. There will be some stuff that isn't in the books. Maps, expansion on some material, historical notes, that sort of thing.

    Tags

    bwb,
  • 8

    Interview: Jun 16th, 1995

    Robert Jordan

    On linking he stated that six men is the maximum number of men present in a link, and 66 is the limit for women. He also said that the "one more women than men rule" in the Lord of Chaos glossary was invalid. Complete rules for linking would be found in the WoT Guide.

    Footnote

    Six men is the minimum number necessary for a circle of 72, which is the maximum size circle (and that would leave 66 spots for women), but there can be as many as 35 men in a full circle.

    Tags

  • 9

    Interview: Jun 16th, 1995

    Robert Jordan

    The amount of notes he held on persons, countries, cultures, cities, events etc he approximated to be as large as the amount of text in the currently published books. Some of this information, albeit a very small part, will be included in the WoT Guide.

    Tags

  • 10

    Interview: Apr 5th, 1996

    Robert Jordan

    Jordan said that many fans want to know what he'll write next, and many want to know if he'll ever write about the Age of Legends. He said that other than the Wheel of Time series and the forthcoming Illustrated Guide, he's (probably) not going to write anything else in the same setting. The Illustrated Guide to the Wheel of Time will contain:

    * The history and rise of Artur Hawkwing
    * The formation of the modern Aes Sedai organization (i.e., post-Breaking)
    * The Aiel War, especially the Battle of the Shining Walls (which will be told from several different viewpoints)
    * Some things about the Seanchan not included in the WoT story
    * Art by someone other than Darrell K. Sweet

    This is not a complete list of what will be in the Illustrated Guide.

    Tags

  • 11

    Interview: Apr 5th, 1996

    Bill Garrett

    The Strike at Shayol Ghul

    Many people have asked about a short piece of writing called "The Strike at Shayol Ghul". Most people want to know: "Is it actually real, and if so, what does it say?"

    Robert Jordan

    First, it is real. Robert Jordan wrote it and it was included in the BaltiCon printed program. It's about four pages long in printed form, and is now available on the Web courtesy of Tor Books. Copies of the convention program, which includes the story, may still be available. See Colette Schleifer's announcement for information.

    The free availability of The Strike at Shayol Ghul on the eeb makes this summary rather superfluous (I wrote it when Strike was only available in printed form, in very limited quantity) but I'm keeping it here for completeness. Now on with my summary.

    In "The Strike at Shayol Ghul", Jordan describes the events leading up to the Sealing of the Bore from the perspective of a Third Age historian (at about the time of the story) who discovered some fragmented manuscripts that were written shortly after the Breaking. The single biggest fact revealed is that the during the War of the Shadow, the Aes Sedai were considering two alternate plans for defeating the Dark One.

    Lews Therin proposed that the Dark One be resealed in his prison by plugging the Bore. The plug would be inserted by thirteen linked male and female channelers and would be held in place by the seven seals, which were focus points of the weaving. 20,000 soldiers would accompany them to Shayol Ghul, where the Bore could most be sensed. Lews Therin's plan had supporters and opponents. Opponents argued that the Seals required precise positioning, and that any slight error would tear the Bore open wider.

    The alternate plan, which also had its share of supporters and detractors, was to build two large sa'angreal (one for saidin, one for saidar) and use them to build a new prison around the old one for the Dark One. The sa'angreal were so powerful that special "key" ter'angreal had to be constructed for channelers to use them safely. Opponents of this plan expressed concern that the sa'angreal could fall into the control of channelers following the Shadow or be misused accidentally by channelers serving the Light. Either way, the sa'angreal were expected to be powerful enough to destroy the world and beyond. Opponents also worried that while the sa'angreal might enable the building of a wall strong enough to contain the Dark One's strength right then, the Dark One was gradually chipping away at the Bore and gaining more power in the world. At some point, he might become powerful enough to tear down the new wall.

    Supporters of each plan began preparation, even though the Aes Sedai as a whole failed to reach a consensus.

    Latra Posae, an outspoken female Aes Sedai, considered Lews Therin's plan so dangerous that she organized support amongst the female Aes Sedai against it. In fact, she obtained the unanimous agreement of every female AS of significant power—in other words, every female Aes Sedai who could possibly be asked to assist in the force that would place the seven seals into the Bore to seal it shut. They believed this effectively halted Lews Therin's plan, as the men who supported him could not link without any cooperating women. (It was believed that correct placement of the seals required a linked group of the most powerful male and female channelers.)

    While the Aes Sedai were fighting over which plan should be used, the Shadow advanced rapidly. Lews Therin decided that something had to be done right away, so he covertly organized 113 male channelers who supported his plan (they were later called the Hundred Companions, a slight miscount) and over 10,000 soldiers who were also loyal to him. The force stormed Shayol Ghul, when all thirteen Forsaken were there, and put the Seals into place.

    At the moment of the resealing, the Dark One drove all of the surviving Hundred Companions (about 68, at that point) instantly insane. The Dark One also tainted saidin, although this wasn't discovered until after hundreds of other male channelers had been driven mad from it.

    Reads the introduction of the manuscript: "Whoever reads this, if any remain to read it, weep for us who have no more tears. Pray for us who are damned alive."

    Footnote

    A version of The Strike at Shayol Ghul appears in The World of Robert Jordan's The Wheel of Time (aka the BWB).

    Tags

  • 12

    Interview: Apr 5th, 1996

    Robert Jordan

    The Guide to the Wheel of Time: Out sometime this year, I think. Art by Todd Hamilton—anybody know if this guy has done anything we'd recognize? At least it isn't DKS! Stuff that will be in there: History of Artur Hawkwing, History of the Post-Breaking Aes Sedai, the Seanchan, the Aiel War and the final battle outside Tar Valon.

    Tags

  • 13

    Interview: Jun 26th, 1996

    Compuserve Chat (Verbatim)

    Ryssgarde

    You include a glossary in every novel. Any chance we'll see a companion book with EVERY term defined? How about prequels to this series?

    Robert Jordan

    The possibility of a companion book with all the terms defined is fairly strong—once the series is done of course!

    As far as prequels, that would depend entirely on my coming up with a story I'd like to tell that is set there. It's not enough to say, "I just want to write what came before this." I tell the history of this world in great detail already. I will add that we're putting together an illustrated guide which will include some things that are not in the books such as the story of Arthur Hawkwing's rise and fall.

    Tags

  • 14

    Interview: Jun 26th, 1996

    Compuserve Chat (Verbatim)

    Timmorn

    Do you ever plan to print/release any of the notes or character sketches, or anything like that?

    Robert Jordan

    Well, some of the information has gone into the illustrated guide, and I expect some would go into the dictionary/encyclopedia, whatever, when the series is done.

    Tags

  • 15

    Interview: Jun 27th, 1996

    AOL Chat 1 (Verbatim)

    Anastin B

    Good evening Mr. Jordan. I was wondering if you were plaining on doing, or letting someone do, a companion book for the Wheel of Time?

    Robert Jordan

    There is an illustrated guide to the world of the Wheel of Time in the works. It is planned to have 64 color illustrations and 80,000 words or so of text and it will include a good bit of information that I did not intend to put in the books. There will be a map of the entire world in the illustrated guide. I don't have an estimated publication date at this time.

    Tags

    bwb,
  • 16

    Interview: Jun 27th, 1996

    AOL Chat 2 (Verbatim)

    Anastin BW

    Mr. Jordan, any idea who will be doing the art for the companion book?

    Robert Jordan

    An artist named Todd Hamilton is doing the work for the illustrated guide.

    Tags

    bwb,
  • 17

    Interview: Oct 18th, 1996

    AOL Chat (Verbatim)

    Question

    Any plans for a book of artwork that depicts your vision of the world in your books?

    Robert Jordan

    Yes, in a way. Next October, there will be "An Illustrated Guide to the World of The Wheel of Time". Released by Tor Books. It will have a great deal of information about the back history of the stories and the world. And also, some 80 or 90 full color illustrations including maps of the entire world of the Seanchan Empire, maps of the nations of the Compact of the Ten Nations, and the nations as they existed at the time. As well as pictures of a number of the individuals from the books. In some cases those pictures look exactly as I envision the person. In other cases, the artist and I just couldn't come to a full agreement on what I was trying to describe. All in all, I am very satisfied with the pictures, though.

    There will also be about 120-130,000 words of text telling about things like how the White Tower was founded and why the White Tower looks monolithic from the outside and so very fractured from the inside. There will be a good deal of the history of people like Artur Hawkwing and the Amyrlins for the last thousand years or so.

    Tags

    bwb,
  • 18

    Interview: Oct 18th, 1996

    AOL Chat (Verbatim)

    Question

    Will there be one artist on the book or a multitude?

    Robert Jordan

    If you mean The Guide, it will be one artist all the way through, a man named Todd Hamilton.

    Tags

    bwb,
  • 19

    Interview: Oct 9th, 1996

    Question

    Info re: Ajahs?

    Robert Jordan

    In the illustrated guide will be information revealed about how they came about that affects the books not at all.

    Tags

  • 20

    Interview: Jun 28th, 1997

    Demandre

    Mr. Jordan does the guide have pictures of every character?

    Robert Jordan

    Not every character, but a good many of them. All of the major characters, certainly.

    Tags

    bwb,
  • 21

    Interview: Nov 11th, 1997

    Terry Miles

    Is there any new information in the new book that has not already been presented in the existing books?

    Robert Jordan

    Yes. There's almost nothing that is in the new book that is in the other books. There are things that are mentioned in the books and greatly expanded and they contain a great deal of information that is nowhere in the novels.

    Tags

    bwb,
  • 22

    Interview: Nov 11th, 1997

    Bob from California

    I hear you wrote a Western? Is that true? If so, I'd love to read it. Any plans for any more Westerns or historical novels in the future? By the way, I just got The World of Robert Jordan's The Wheel of Time...what a gorgeous book. Great work!!!!!

    Robert Jordan

    Well, thanks. As far as the Westerns go—yes I wrote a Western once. A little out of the ordinary, set in the 1830s and with only one major character who was not a Cheyenne Indian. I might do a Western one day or more historical novels. History and the American West in general interest me greatly. But for the moment, The Wheel of Time takes up all of mine—time that is.

    Tags

  • 23

    Interview: Nov 11th, 1997

    Linda from Sweden

    I've only had a quick look at the guide so far, but I couldn't find much additional information on Mayene. Perhaps you could tell us which, if any, cultures you have based it on and what the people are like, apart from that they don't exactly seem to suffer from excessive modesty. ;)

    Robert Jordan

    Well Mayene is based culturally on the cities of the Hanseatic league, as well as Venice and Genoa when those cities were world commercial powers and city states in themselves. Of course, I didn't put anything into the guide that I wanted to come as a surprise in the books. You have to remember that. Which is one reason I gave quite as much as I did about the history of the world and considerably less about the "present day."

    Tags

  • 24

    Interview: Nov 11th, 1997

    Kate from State College, PA

    In a previous statement I believe you had basically said that the action of the series would take place in the lands known to Rand and his friends, i.e., not Shara or Seanchan and yet the new book has a lot of stuff about those lands—have you changed your mind? Is action in either of these two lands a possibility now?

    Robert Jordan

    No. Except for the possible occasional divergence, except for Rand's excursions to Seanchan when he chased after Aviendha. I was willing to put as much as I did into the the guide because I will not be using those things in the books in the same way that I used Kandor or Saldaea.

    Tags

  • 25

    Interview: Nov 11th, 1997

    John from State College, PA

    The Guide has a lot of stuff we have not seen before. But there are a lot of references made in the series that had no mention in the Guide. As you have totally captivated me with your world, can I hope for another guide at the end of the series for more information on all those trivial bits we have come to love?

    Robert Jordan

    I do intend to do an encyclopedia, if you will, at the end of the series, but I don't want to do too much about what is in the books until the series is finished.

    Tags

  • 26

    Interview: Nov 11th, 1997

    Rhonda Peters from Toronto, Ontario

    Hi Mr. Jordan, thanks for doing this. I've read the new book (and enjoyed it). I found it very surprising that the Red Ajah would have the largest membership, could you expand on why that's so? The numbers of male channelers have been dwindling prior to the events of the story, and Aes Sedai from other Ajahs seem to be willing to help capture and gentle men. Do the Reds have another role in the Tower, or is there some other reason for their numbers?

    Robert Jordan

    Some faces of being Aes Sedai are being carried out by all Aes Sedai. That is, a Blue sister might dig out an old manuscript and old knowledge. A Brown sister might take on a man who can channel. And a Red sister might engage in political manipulation. But the fact is to the world at large—one of the primary functions of Aes Sedai is to protect the world from men who can channel. That means that a fair number of young women who go to the White Tower, go thinking that this will be one of their major functions as Aes Sedai. So the Red Ajah and the Green Ajah are the two largest.

    Tags

  • 27

    Interview: Nov 11th, 1997

    Jason Verner from TX

    Do you have any plans for introducing the Land of Madmen into the Wheel of Time series besides its mention in the Guide, and if so can you elaborate a little?

    Robert Jordan

    Read and Find Out.

    Tags

  • 28

    Interview: Oct 19th, 1998

    Only me from Texas

    I realize books take a long time to write, but why did it take 2.5 years to write this and then leave out Mat? Will the next book take as long?

    Robert Jordan

    I hope the next book will not take as long. "New Spring" took several months to write, and I also spent several months working on the illustrated guide. So those, between the two of them, took a lot more time than I thought it was going to. That delayed this book considerably.

    Footnote

    Although this was the night before the release, it's typical for some fans to get early copies (in various ways) and to leak certain tidbits on the web in the week or two before everyone else gets it.

    Tags

  • 29

    Interview: Nov 1st, 1998

    SciFi.com Chat (Verbatim)

    Nick

    How long does it take you to write a full-length novel?

    Robert Jordan

    The Eye of The World took four years. The next five took fourteen or fifteen months each. A Crown of Swords took 22 months. The Path of Daggers took a little less than that, but during that book I wrote "New Spring" for the Legends anthology. And I also did a lot of work on a title coming up: The Illustrated Guide.

    Tags

  • 30

    Interview: Nov 1st, 1998

    SciFi.com Chat (Verbatim)

    tag

    Aside from pictures, what will be the differences between the Illustrated Guide and "The World of Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time?"

    Robert Jordan

    That is the same thing. The Illustrated Guide to the World of Robert Jordan's Wheel Of Time is the full title.

    Tags

    bwb,
  • 31

    Interview: Nov 11th, 2000

    Ryan from New Orleans

    What is the average term of office for the average Amyrlin, assuming she isn't deposed?

    Robert Jordan

    If you check the list of Amyrlins in the illustrated guide, which covers about 1000 years prior to the story, you'll find that there's quite a wide variation—up to 50 or 60 years for some, and for others, perhaps 20. In large part, it depends how old she was when she was chosen Amyrlin. That is, given that she wasn't deposed.

    Tags

  • 32

    Interview: Nov 11th, 2000

    David from Austin

    When will the Land of Madmen (as shown in the Guide) come into play, and are you considering ever making a second edition of the Guide?

    Robert Jordan

    As for when or if it will come into play, read and find out. As for another edition of the guide, I would like to do a concordance or encyclopedia when the cycle is finished, but I have no plans before that.

    Tags

  • 33

    Interview: Nov 14th, 2000

    SciFi.com Chat (Verbatim)

    Vsove

    Are you going to put out an updated Guide? The old one's becoming increasingly out of date.

    Robert Jordan

    Well, probably not until the series finished. But I do think it would be a great thing to do then. I have some notes for it.

    Tags

  • 34

    Interview: Apr 7th, 2001

    Question

    Oh, this was very interesting: a question about the artwork in the guide.

    Robert Jordan

    Well, the difficulty with the pictures was something that I did not discover until far too late, the artist who was hired to do the pictures... see, this was done by a packager. Someone who came to me, and done guides before, and came to me and said, "I would like to do this, and here is one I did for Marion Zimmer Bradley, and here's the one I did for Bob Silverberg, and here's the one I did for Jack Vance, and would you, you know..."

    I said alright, this looks good, and I called up these people and they said that things went well, but my publisher...the artist was hired to do a certain number of black and white drawings. And as soon as this guy got the package together he went to my publisher, my ... who said yeah, I'd like to publish this. And my publisher said, "No, I'd like to have color drawings, not black and white, and you want to do x number of drawings, but I would like five times as many illustrations."

    And that was all good, except that the artist contract...what I did not know was that the artist contract called for a flat fee. And the man who put the package together did not increase the amount of money that he was going to pay the artist. The artist was then asked to do five times as many drawings, in color, instead of in black and white for the same amount of money. His enthusiasm dwindled. [laughter] Now if I had known about this, I would have given the artist some money out of my own pocket, to get better pictures. I couldn't understand why the man who had sat in my study, and drawn such wonderful sketches just from my off-the-cuff descriptions, was suddenly making drawings that seemed very...not very good. But, that was the reason.

    Tags

    bwb,
  • 35

    Interview: Sep 1st, 2005

    Jennifer Liang

    Immediately following that, we had a Q&A session with Teresa Patterson.

    Teresa Patterson

    Teresa, as always, was a very funny, interesting lady to talk to. She spoke about some of her upcoming projects and her work as a balloon sculptor.

    She explained that the Guide was written with deliberate inaccuracies. One of the reoccurring themes of the series is that people don’t necessarily know all they think they do, but still have to make decisions based on what they know. They decided the book would be written from the point of view of a historian who had good, but not necessarily great information on a variety of subjects. So Jordan withheld information from her while she was writing the book, or he would tell her things, but then ask that she not include it.

    She said that she would love to work on another project like this again, but that was up to the publishers.

    Tags

    bwb,
  • 36

    Interview: Oct 2nd, 2005

    Robert Jordan

    For DomA, I can't be sure that the logical patterns you see in the election of Amyrlins are the same that I used in making the list, but there are logical patterns to them. If Harriet adds to the Encyclopedia who was a strong Amyrlin, who middling and who weak, you might see more patterns.

    Footnote

    There is a list of all the Amyrlins since Hawkwing and the Ajah from which each was raised in the BWB.

    Tags

  • 37

    Interview: Jan 20th, 2006

    Robert Jordan

    For Anonymous, there is a map of the entire world in the Guide, and also a map of the entire continent that holds Andor etc. Shara lies on that continent, east of the Aiel Waste. The inhabitants of this world think of there world as "the world" or as "the Earth." While there have been cultures on our planet that have given fanciful names to their worlds, most have referred to it as the world or earth.

    Tags

  • 38

    Interview: Feb, 2005

    Dragonmount

    Bob Kluttz

    We were fortunate enough to get hold of Teresa Patterson, Co-Author of The World of Robert Jordan's The Wheel of Time (commonly referred to as "The Guide"). Teresa keeps a very busy schedule, so we were thrilled when she agreed to sit down with us for a few minutes and answer our questions.

    Footnote

    The book is also commonly referred to as the Big White Book (BWB) or the BBoBA (Big Book of Bad Art).
    Bob Kluttz is one of the creators of Encyclopaedia WoT.

    Tags

    bwb,
  • 39

    Interview: Feb, 2005

    Bob Kluttz

    How does a project like the Wheel of Time world book get set up?

    Teresa Patterson

    World books, like the one for the Wheel of Time are usually put together by a Packager—in this case Bill Fawcett—who, with the approval of the publishing house and the series author, puts together a team of artists and a writer to do the project. The publishing house and the series author then approve the choices for main author and artist. Once that is done contracts are issued and the project begins.

    Tags

    bwb,
  • 40

    Interview: Feb, 2005

    Bob Kluttz

    The big question for Robert Jordan fans: What's it like working with Robert Jordan? How did that experience compare to other collaborations?

    Teresa Patterson

    Robert Jordan is probably the finest world builder working in Fantasy today. His background in physics, history, and social dynamics combine to give him an appreciation of world dynamics that are currently unmatched in literature. For me, that made the job of documenting his world both challenging and intriguing. The bad part is that I did not get to create much to add to the universe—he had most things worked out and knew how he wanted them presented. I will admit that I had much more creative latitude with some of my other co-authors, but I had a larger canvas with Robert Jordan's universe. I also love history and discovered that we shared that as well as an appreciation of old weapons and military tactics. He has put a lot of thought into all the things that make Rand's world a complex place, so that everything has a history or a science to it, even if those details never appear in the books. Few authors go to that much trouble to create the background on which their characters perform. I spent a lot of time asking questions and listening to Jordan talk as he took me inside that universe.

    Tags

    bwb,
  • 41

    Interview: Feb, 2005

    Bob Kluttz

    Did you work with him in his home office or exchange data by phone and e-mail? What was a typical workday like?

    Teresa Patterson

    First, we (the lead artist, the packager, and myself) all re-read all the then current books. I made notes and highlighted things I wanted to explore. Then at a preset time, we spent a week or so at RJ and Harriet's wonderful colonial home. I used the time to pick RJ's brain about his world and Todd used the time to make sketches of places and characters for his approval. He then also supplemented the discussions with a large packet of written materials and notes that he had made while writing the series. I organized the materials into an order and format that seemed sensible and then filled in the gaps if necessary. We communicated by phone or mail when necessary. As I completed each section of the manuscript it was then sent back to RJ for his notes, corrections, and approval. I made any requested changes. Then the finished book was sent to the packager, and on to the publisher. The publisher then made additional changes—some of which I did not know about until the book was released.

    Tags

    bwb,
  • 42

    Interview: Jun 4th, 2011

    Brandon Sanderson

    Sanderson confirmed that there would an update for the companion book, The World of Robert Jordan's The Wheel of Time, lovingly known as the Big White Book. This would be in the form of an encyclopaedia, and contain much more information. A proposed date for this release would be about one year after A Memory of Light.

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  • 43

    Interview: 2011

    Twitter 2011 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Bronwyn ECG (1 December 2011)

    Is there ever gonna be an update to The World of Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time?

    Brandon Sanderson (2 December 2011)

    Yes, there will be! Harriet is doing an encyclopedia set to come out in a couple of years.

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  • 44

    Interview: Feb, 2005

    Bob Kluttz

    Many fans wonder whether the Wheel of Time world book should be considered "canon." Did Mr. Jordan verify all the factual information in the book?

    Teresa Patterson

    Mr. Jordan "verified" the facts, in that he had final approval over the manuscript and everything that went into it, but we wrote it as a "living" history—in other words, we wrote it from the point of view of a learned scholarly person living during Rand's generation who had some unusual access to rare books relics, and materials. Whether this person's assumptions about the true nature of those artifacts or the histories that were uncovered were the truth is only as certain as it is for any of our own present day historians and archeologists. This is doubly complicated because some facts are always lost to time, even in Rand's world, and that not all truths are recorded accurately—especially of the Aes Sedai have decided to muddy the waters.

    The result is that we wanted each reader to take away his or her own interpretation of the veracity of the information. Does the book reflect what R.J. intended? So far as I know, it does. Does it reflect the last and only word on Rand and his world? Perhaps. We also believed the dinosaurs to be cold blooded reptiles for many years. Now the current belief says they were warm blooded and related to birds. Which is canon? Who knows? Will it change again? As with Rand's world—wait and see.

    Tags

    bwb,
  • 45

    Interview: Feb, 2005

    Bob Kluttz

    Can you recall any specific areas of the book where you were on your own? Conversely, what parts did Robert Jordan write or verify?

    Teresa Patterson

    RJ verified everything. He is the property holder and I wrote at his pleasure. There were some sections which I was allowed to play with—so long as it stayed within his vision of course—and others which were completely his. It has been long enough that I no longer recall which parts of the book were wholly mine—especially since the short stories that were originally scattered throughout the manuscript were all cut in the final version—but I can tell you that certain parts—such as the History of Artur Hawkwing and the Calendar and dating systems were wholly Robert Jordan.

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  • 46

    Interview: Feb, 2005

    Bob Kluttz

    Did you have direct access to any of Robert Jordan's files? Did you pick up any juicy tidbits? Any that you can share?

    Teresa Patterson

    He gave me access to a lot of notes and information. But there is nothing I can share that was not already in the book. I can tell you that I did clearly see the inspiration for the women in his book in RJ's wife, Harriet.

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  • 47

    Interview: Feb, 2005

    Bob Kluttz

    As an artist yourself, what are your thoughts on the artwork in the Wheel of Time world book?

    Teresa Patterson

    I was a little disappointed with the final version of many of the character pieces, but I guess it should be no surprise that the characters as they appeared in my head look different from Todd's vision of them. I think most people have their own vision of how the characters look. I know that R.J. had approval over the initial sketches, but I was disappointed that the finished pieces were not tighter. I can say I would have done them differently—but not necessarily any better. Todd has received a lot of criticism for his pieces in the book. I know Todd was under a lot of stress and pressure, and I suspect it affected the final product more than he would have liked.

    The inserts with the Darrel Sweet covers however, are wonderfully reproduced—even though R.J. says Mr. Sweet's covers are not necessarily accurate. Darrell Sweet did the cover of the anthology for my first story, so I have a particular fondness for his work. Elisa Mitchell did a great job with the cover art—though I will never understand why they shrank her piece down and surrounded it with gobs of white space. I guess it was some kind of marketing choice. I was also happy with most of the spot illustrations, ornaments, and maps that she and John Ford and Thomas Canty contributed.

    Footnote

    RJ explained in another interview that Todd Hamilton kind of got screwed in his contract, which affected the quality of his art.

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  • 48

    Interview: Feb, 2005

    Bob Kluttz

    Are there any plans to update the book with new information? Would you be interested in such a project?

    Teresa Patterson

    So far as I know there are no plans to update the book. I would certainly be willing to work on an update, and have recently completed working on an updated version of my other Worldbook for the Shannara series for Terry Brooks. In that case I found revisiting the world was like returning to an old friend. I suspect that would also be the case with Rand's world.

    Tags

    bwb,
  • 49

    Interview: 2013

    Twitter 2013 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Leonard K (8 January 2013)

    Are you going to be in on the Encyclopedia just mentioned? We are all dreading a big white book repeat.

    Brandon Sanderson (8 January 2013)

    Harriet and Team Jordan have it well in hand, and will do a far better job than I could.

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  • 50

    Interview: Apr, 2013

    Question

    Based on the weather of the different lands, it seems like Randland is in the northern hemisphere of the planet. Are there lands to the south of Randland? The Seanchan came from the West across the Aryth Ocean—is Shara on their western border?

    Maria Simons

    There is a map of the whole world of The Wheel of Time in The World of Robert Jordan's The Wheel of Time; it shows Randland to be almost totally in the northern hemisphere, with a small southern portion of Shara being in the southern hemisphere. Below Randland, at apparently the same longitude though covering a much smaller area, is the Land of Madmen. Seanchan is spread over the northern and southern hemispheres, and on its western border is the Morenal Ocean; that ocean is also the eastern border of Shara.

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  • 51

    Interview: Apr 20th, 2013

    Terez

    Brandon has said that Rand killed Aginor. (It was also in the BWB.) I think he was kind of iffy on it, but I tended to think that Rand killed him; some people say that Aginor overdosed, but I always thought that it was Rand taking the Power of the Eye from him that killed him, you know? It's like the shock of having it taken away...do you know?

    Maria Simons

    I don't know. I always thought it was Rand too, but I don't know.

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  • 52

    Interview: Apr 20th, 2013

    Terez

    Will there be anything more about the Land of Madmen in the Encyclopedia, or is the Guide all we get?

    Maria Simons

    To the best of my knowledge, the Guide is all you get. There might be a sentence more somewhere, but not extensive information.

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  • 53

    Interview: Mar, 2006

    Robert Jordan

    The Encyclopedia's already been published [BWB], but we have the raw notes. To keep track of what I've written, I have all sorts of "Remember" files. Every nation has a file listing culture, customs, everything about that country I might need to know plus every character who has been mentioned as a native of that country, all the information that's been given about him or her in the books, even some things that haven't been used yet. There's a file for everyone: named and unnamed, living, dead, historical, whatever! "Who Is Where" is a file that lists, country by country, the last place every character in the book was seen. "ABC" (which used to be called "The Glossary") has every word or term or name I've created including every word in the Old Tongue. If I printed out all the "Remember" files, they'd be somewhere between 1,300 and 1,500 pages—but there are limits! They would probably be insanely boring for most people, but I want to make sure I remember what I created on the fly.

    Tor has set up a website with a Question and Answer of the week. And Jason Denzel at Dragonmount.com set up a blog for me. When I'm not touring I'll post maybe once every week or two. I haven't been flamed yet on my site and trolls haven't shown up, but I don't know that I expect them to. My fans are generally pretty nice, polite people. In their discussion groups they say who they hate and what they hate about what I've written—that's OK; if I can create somebody powerful enough that people really hate them, I'm doing my job even if I didn't mean for them to be hated. The characters don't have lives of their own, though. Whatever my readers may think, I'm an Old Testament God with my fist in the middle of my characters' lives: I created them and they do what I want, when I want them to! I do figure out why they're behaving that way, as if they werereal people, and that helps the reader believe in them.

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