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Your search for the tag 'lord of chaos' yielded 43 results

  • 1

    Interview: Dec, 1993

    Question

    When will the next book be released (UK & USA) and what will it be titled?

    Robert Jordan

    The next book (#6; Lord of Chaos) should be released in the UK in November 1994. I'd have it out quicker if I could, but it does take a little time to write these books.

    Tags

  • 2

    Interview: Dec, 1993

    Question

    What is the name of the next book, and will Perrin be in it a bit more than in The Fires of Heaven?

    Robert Jordan

    Lord of Chaos is the title of number six at present. A working title, but I like it. As for Perrin, he will definitely be back sooner or later.

    Tags

  • 3

    Interview: Oct 17th, 1994

    Daniel Rouk (18 October 1994)

    After a day to think about the signing again, and think about things to ask today, I realized I forgot a few things...

    Robert Jordan

    Jordan confirmed that this book [Lord of Chaos] is really much as people have said, the first part of a two-part story. (So what is a two-book series in a nine-book series called? Of course since he also said he hasn't finished the next book, or even really knows how far along he is, this may or may not be true.)

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  • 4

    Interview: Oct 17th, 1994

    Question

    Isn't Lord of Chaos half of a book?

    Robert Jordan

    Yes. He wanted to experiment. There's something else which is experimental, but he won't say what.

    Footnote

    I asked Erica about this concept that Lord of Chaos is 'half a book', since it was mentioned a lot in reports of the period. I told her I thought it was odd, since now (2011) Lord of Chaos is by and far one of the fan favorites. It's interesting, because the older fans generally tend to favor books 1-3, and Erica herself was most impressed by The Dragon Reborn. One has to wonder if RJ didn't slow down to show them what 'half a book' was really like (aside from being worn out after completing his six-book contract with book-a-year deadlines).

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  • 5

    Interview: Oct 19th, 1994

    Compuserve Chat (Verbatim)

    Degan Outridge

    Thanks for many hours of enjoyment. There were so many new stories/threads in Lord of Chaos did you always intend to go in these directions or did it take on a life of its own?

    Robert Jordan

    For the major threads, I'm going exactly where I intended to go—and for most of the minor threads, I'm going fairly much where I intended to go. With some minor threads, it seemed, as I went along, that there was a better way than I had first thought.

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  • 6

    Interview: Oct 20th, 1994

    Delemin

    My dear fellow rasfwrjians, as (to the best of my knowledge) the only one of us to attend the signing at Science Fiction, Mysteries, and More on Thursday, I feel obliged to report what Jordan said there, and my impressions.

    Robert Jordan was stockier, shorter, and better cushioned than I expected. He wore a wide brimmed hat and walked with a cane with a ram's horn like handle. Generally he was open and friendly. When he came in late he explained that it was because Princess Di was in New York to meet Bill Clinton to discuss Vince Foster's suicide. However he made repeated references to being worn out and overworked by Lord of Chaos.

    Robert Jordan

    "If I work that hard on this one I'll die," he commented several times. Apparently he worked 12-14 hours a day, 7 days a week. In August (he usually finishes in May) the folks at Tor sequestered him in a hotel in New York City, where he finished the book in two weeks. He said he would try to get the book out on time but he figured we would rather have him finish a book late than finish his life early.

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  • 7

    Interview: 2010

    Andrew Leston (7 August 2010)

    I believe I've figured out who Demandred is based solely on Lord of Chaos. Is this possible?

    Brandon Sanderson (7 August 2010)

    It MIGHT be possible. I honestly can't remember where all of the clues are.

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  • 8

    Interview: 2010

    Jacob Wallace (11 August 2010)

    In Lord of Chaos, second chapter, Taim gives Rand a prison seal, the seventh from my count. Does anyone know that all seven have been found?

    Brandon Sanderson (11 August 2010)

    RAFO. :)

    Tags

  • 9

    Interview: Oct 23rd, 1994

    Harriet McDougal Rigney

    Next we talked about Lord of Chaos and its creation. It took a long time to compile, in fact TOO much time. It was "supposed" to be done by April 1994 at the latest. However, it wasn't even close to being done. Somewhere past the deadline, they lost a chapter [I believe it was Dumai's Wells, which might explain why it's so choppy]. They flew RJ up to New York and he wrote the final parts in a hotel for about two weeks. He finished on August 28, 1994. Tor had to do MAJOR overtime to check and edit it for its Oct. 12 release date. Mrs. Jordan also added that Lord of Chaos was their most difficult one composed ever. It was a real marker as to how fast they could produce a novel at this point in the series. After his book signing tour he's going straight to his word processor and type through Thanksgiving and probably Xmas, 'cause he hasn't even started yet. RJ made an arrangement with a manager (I think) from Tor for a March deadline. If book seven wasn't completed by that time, then the fall release would be cancelled, meaning that book seven will not be released to as late as Fall 1996 possibly. This manager seems to have forgotten this arrangement and wanted to have it released by fall 1995, under pressure from Tor publishing and the parent St. Martin's it appears.

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  • 10

    Interview: Oct 26th, 1994

    Greg

    I couldn't resist telling him that I really dislike the cover to Lord of Chaos because I've had three people who know nothing about WoT see me reading the book and think I'm reading a cheesy romance novel because of that terrible picture of Rand.

    Robert Jordan

    RJ replied that they probably thought I was reading soft porn, and that some of those cheesy romance novels I was talking about are some of the best soft porn he knows of. Later someone asked to have his picture taken with RJ and he replied, "What kind of picture are we talking about? I'll only do it if I get to keep my clothes on." Oh, and RJ said that the woman on the cover of Lord of Chaos is an Aes Sedai of the Red Ajah, but he doesn't know which Aes Sedai because it was changed a number of times.

    Tags

  • 11

    Interview: 2011

    Twitter 2011 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Austin Moore (6 January 2011)

    Who was the Lord of Chaos that Demandred and Taim both mention? There has been tons of debate.

    Brandon Sanderson (6 January 2011)

    Really? I thought that one was obvious. What's the debate about?

    Terez

    It's Rand. Look in the BWB re: Feast of Fools.

    Austin Moore

    Why was Demandred and Taim saying, "Let the Lord of Chaos rule" if it was Rand? Sorry just read through series once so far :(

    Terez

    Here's a quote for you:

    The Feast of Fools
    Celebrated in Tammaz (in Arad Doman and the Borderlands) or Saven (everywhere else), the exact day varying according to locality. A day in which all order is deliberately inverted; the high perform lowly tasks (running errands, serving at table, etc.) while the low do no work and give orders to their usual superiors. In many villages and towns the most foolish person is given a title such as the Lord/Lady of Unreason/Misrule/Chaos or the King/Queen of Fools. Not an honor sought, but for that one day everyone has to obey whatever orders, however foolish, are given by the chosen one. (Called the Festival of Unreason in Saldaea; the Festival of Fools in Kandor; Foolday in Baerlon and the Two Rivers.)

    Matt Hatch

    I've always enjoyed this theory about the Lord of Chaos. It's fun.

    Brandon Sanderson

    That is a good theory for people to be reading.

    Terez

    YAY. OMG, that theory has been on the rocks for years because of contradicting tour reports.

    Terez

    Also, your tour quotes were vague enough to allow it but most people didn't see it that way.

    Brandon Sanderson

    I didn't say the theory was true, just that you should study it. :) But I would like to see those tour reports.

    Terez

    Yes, yes. :) Also, your vague(ish) wording. And the contradicting RJ reports.

    Footnote

    Adding to Brandon's implications here is Sorilea's comment in reference to the balefiring of Natrin's Barrow, in The Gathering Storm Chapter 27: "We felt the world warping from here, but did not know what had caused it. We assumed it to be the Dark One's work." (Similar to the ripples Perrin and Faile experienced in Knife of Dreams.) This opens up the possibility that people have no idea really what they're talking about when they assume that the warping of reality is due to the Dark One's touch, just as Alviarin had no idea what she was talking about when she assumed that the rotting food was the Dark One's touch (Knife of Dreams, Prologue).

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  • 12

    Interview: Apr 5th, 1996

    Robert Jordan

    The Aes Sedai who beat Rand in Lord of Chaos did not necessarily violate the Three Oaths. Jordan explained that the Three Oaths are bound by literal intent and perception. He said that the Aes Sedai could have considered the beatings a just punishment rather than the use of a weapon. He also suggested that not everything that harms you need be considered a weapon. I think he gave the example of a whip used lightly not considered a weapon, versus a whip used to flay skin being considered a weapon. On the subject of the first Oath ("to speak no word that is untrue"), Jordan said that Aes Sedai can say something they believe to be true or something they don't mean literally. As an example of the latter, an Aes Sedai can employ hyperbole and say something like, "I'm going to tie your ears over your head," when she means to do no such thing.

    FOOTNOTE—BILL GARRETT

    My Comment: I should also point out that at least two of the women who beat Rand are people we know to belong to the Black Ajah. On page 683hb (in Lord of Chaos), it is said that only Galina, Erian, and Katerine beat Rand more than once. We know that Galina and Katerine are Black Ajah, so they aren't bound by the Oaths anyway. Erian is the Aes Sedai whose two Warders Rand killed, so maybe she found some way to justify her punishment of Rand under the Three Oaths. I don't know who else beat Rand (i.e., who beat him only once); the book may say, but I can't find a quote.

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  • 13

    Interview: Apr 5th, 1996

    Robert Jordan

    The oaths: They are quite subjective; if an Aes Sedai believes she is not lying, then the Oath doesn't stop her. So, that is what was going on in the torturing part of Lord of Chaos. It depends on the psychology of the individual. It's like spanking a naughty child. Some people regard that as child abuse; some people regard it as reasonable punishment.

    Tags

  • 14

    Interview: Jun 26th, 1996

    Compuserve Chat (Verbatim)

    D. John Witherspoon

    In the first five books, the pace of the story, switching between character situations and the action in general was high speed and covered significant periods of time. In Lord of Chaos, the story seemed to slow. Was this intentional or only my perception?

    Robert Jordan

    It covered a shorter period of time, but in Lord of Chaos and A Crown of Swords there were a great many things that happen in a short time that made it necessary to have the books, if not slower paced from the reader's point of view, slower as far as the chronology is concerned.

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  • 15

    Interview: Oct 29th, 1998

    Robert Jordan

    As the line was drying up, the crowd apparently consisted mainly of several booksellers. They got talking about first edition printings of the hardcovers for The Eye of the World. Jordan said that he has a whole box of them at home, and that he should give the bunch of them to his son, so he can finance all his children's college educations... At a later time, he said that he heard recently from a used fantasy dealer that an unsigned first printing The Eye of the World was sold from his store for $700 dollars. RJ said he had heard of prices around $300, but not that high. He also said he heard of first printing Lord of Chaos's going at $55, which he seemed to think was absurd, since well over 200,000 had been printed. They also commented that at times, the hardcovers have been hard to find, but not because they had been out of print, but because "sensible" people assumed they would be out of print. He said that his books "break the rules", in that hardcovers aren't supposed to stay in print for 8-9 years. He also said that at one point, a computer "glitch" resulted in stores remaindering The Shadow Rising while there was still a high demand for it at the normal price (10,000 sales annually without any advertising). Someone else mentioned that they had been to a bookstore recently which had the hardcover A Crown of Swords both for sale at the regular price and on the remaindering table. Jordan expressed significant disgust with screw-ups of this sort.

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  • 16

    Interview: Mar, 2000

    Robert Jordan

    The first book took four years. The next five books took, on average, 14 months. I finished Lord of Chaos in August 1994, handed the manuscript in, and in October, two months later, I was on tour for that book. I came back and said, 'There isn't time. I cannot write a book for you in time for you to publish it next fall.' I convinced them I couldn't do it, and it's lucky I did, because it turned out A Crown of Swords took almost two years, and so did The Path of Daggers.

    Tags

  • 17

    Interview: Nov 14th, 2000

    SciFi.com Chat (Verbatim)

    ArabianKn

    Mr. Jordan, Whenever a channeler draws on the One Power, does he/she become temporarily outside the Wheel's control? I ask this because Min's viewings of Aes Sedai get fuzzy whenever they draw on the Power and in Lord of Chaos Egwene avoids Rand's ta'veren effect by drawing on saidar.

    Robert Jordan

    Read and find out!

    Tags

  • 18

    Interview: Apr 27th, 2004

    Wotmania Interview (Verbatim)

    Wotmania

    Did the Dark One order Asmodean's death? If not, how does he know about it in the prologue of Lord of Chaos?

    Robert Jordan

    No, he didn't order Asmodean's death, but he knows a great deal about what goes on in the world, though it isn't complete knowledge.

    Tags

  • 19

    Interview: Sep, 2005

    Glas Durboraw

    Your earliest books seemed like they were a little bit larger, I guess, than your more recent books? How has your writing style changed over time with your ten different novels in the series?

    Robert Jordan

    Well, in the series, I'm not certain that the style has changed so much, but the amount of ground covered. In some of the earlier books, frankly, I was writing so many hours a day that I was killing myself. Even my publisher—by the time I reached Lord of Chaos, which was the longest of the books—I handed that in, and my publisher said to me, "You don't look well. You need to take more time before handing in the next book. What about two years instead of one?" And see, now I have breakfast, read the newspaper over breakfast, go to my desk, and generally forgetting to stop for lunch, I write until six in the afternoon when I stop to go in the house and help my wife to get dinner on the table, and I do that seven days a week. There was a time when I got up in the morning and had breakfast and went to work, and I didn't eat lunch, and I wound knock of at...oh, eight or nine o'clock at night, and sometimes I didn't knock off then, and I would do that seven days a week, and that's how I was able to write the longer books in the shorter period of time. But now, it doesn't quite work that way. I cut the books at what seems to me a natural length for that book. Some of the later books could have been a bit longer, but there are also time constraints in getting the book published. When the fans say, "Give us the book, give us the book, give us the book," my publisher says, "We gotta give 'em the book."

    Glas Durboraw

    That makes sense, and it seems also that, in the earlier books, you had to establish the world.

    Tags

  • 20

    Interview: Oct 29th, 2005

    Robert Jordan

    And then he RAFO'd my question about the Tinker caravan that Mat comes across in Lord of Chaos.

    Jeremiah

    Too bad, but at least that means that he will be answering that in the last book. And I still feel special that I got to ask three questions of him!!

    Footnote

    The scene is in Lord of Chaos, Chapter 22.

    Tags

  • 21

    Interview: Nov 4th, 2005

    Robert Jordan

    The theory that Demandred is using balefire at the direction of the Dark One to loosen the weave of the Pattern is squashed by RJ. (confirmed)

    Footnote

    This person is not clear whether the theory was 'squashed' or 'confirmed', but in any case, we discussed it with Brandon here, and it seems as though RJ confirmed it.

    Tags

  • 22

    Interview: Feb 25th, 2008

    Brandon Sanderson

    Anyway, as for Book Six, it was a powerful read. Lews Therin was my favorite character of the book—his interactions with Rand are wonderful. We are left wondering just how much is insanity and how much is another man's soul in Rand's head. Each conversation gives us information about the setting, personality about Rand, and tension for the plot as we wonder about his sanity. Not to mention the occasional laugh at the exchanges, sorrow regarding Therin's tragedy, and a sense of mystery as Rand tries to find out just how much he can interact with Therin. Masterfully done.

    A second response comes with the ending. It's sometimes easy to skip over this ending in light of the dramatic occurrences at the end of Books two and three, and yet I found this to be one of the most tense of the entire series. It was very well foreshadowed and marvelously executed.

    Tags

  • 23

    Interview: Oct 21st, 1994

    AOL Chat 2 (Verbatim)

    Question

    How soon can we expect Lord of Chaos to come out paperback?

    Robert Jordan

    About a year.

    Tags

  • 24

    Interview: Oct 21st, 1994

    AOL Chat 2 (Verbatim)

    Question

    How do Wise Ones get gai'shain? (They don't fight, right?)

    Robert Jordan

    They can be traded, though. Besides which, there are other ways, if you read Lord of Chaos, to become gai'shain.

    Tags

  • 25

    Interview: Oct 21st, 1994

    AOL Chat 2 (Verbatim)

    Question

    I was pleased to see Lord of Chaos appearing as a new bestseller in today's USA Today bestsellers list.

    Robert Jordan

    Thank you.

    Tags

  • 26

    Interview: Mar 19th, 2010

    Luckers

    If you had to name a single moment and a single plotline that was your favourite, what would they be? You're only allowed one. *grins evilly*

    Maria Simons

    Your evil grin is wasted. This one is easy. I have a favorite chapter—chapter five of Lord of Chaos, "A Different Dance." There is just so much classic Mat in that chapter: when he can't keep up with Betse's mouth and Talmanes hums "A Frog on the Ice", his dance with Betse with the memories from just before the Trolloc Wars, taking out the Hunter of the Horn with a low blow, and so much more. I absolutely love that chapter. It may have been that chapter that cemented the love for Mat.

    Tags

  • 27

    Interview: Jun 10th, 2010

    Luckers

    In Lord of Chaos Ch. 20, "Heading South", Mat finds a Tinker caravan where the Tuatha'an have all been slaughtered. One of the Tinkers wrote 'tell the Dragon Reborn' in his own blood...Mat thinks, 'tell him what'? And that is the question—what did one of the Tuatha'an have to tell Rand that was so important? Also, was this done by the Whitecloaks?

    Maria Simons

    I mean, come on. There are still two books to come.

    Tags

  • 28

    Interview: Mar 11th, 2011

    Question

    Merana said that every sister knew when each sister of the Tower arrived and how long she trained (Lord of Chaos, The Crown of Roses). The Tower keeps records on this. She thought Verin had been Aes Sedai about 40 years longer than she and Merana appears to have been Aes Sedai 70 years (their training time was the same and the novice acceptance age range is only three years). Is Merana mistaken in when Verin became Aes Sedai? Or in Verin's age when she came to the Tower?

    Maria Simons

    Okay, this one has me all confused. Can you expand this and explain? I should note that we have asked for a correction to one section in this chapter (I'll include it a bit later). Somehow I'm also missing where Merana says that every sister knows when each one arrived (I do see the bit about knowing how long each was novice and Accepted). Here's the change we asked for (it hasn't been made in the mmp I'm holding; I don't know if it was elsewhere):

    At present reads: Alanna had been six years a novice, Merana only five, but more importantly, Merana had been Aes Sedai ten years the day the midwife laid Alanna at her mother's breast. Should read: Alanna had been six years a novice, Merana only five, but more importantly, Merana had been Aes Sedai above thirty years the day the midwife laid Alanna at her mother's breast.

    Tags

  • 29

    Interview: Apr 17th, 2011

    Terez

    Will the fat man turn up again?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Um...I hope you're not talking about me.

    Terez

    Um...(cracks up) [This made me laugh mostly because I had just noticed that Brandon seems to have shed quite a few pounds, no doubt because his wife occasionally reminds him that he owes it to his fans to stay in shape.]

    Brandon Sanderson

    I hope you're talking about the angreal! Um...I've always had an affection for that little fat man angreal.

    Terez

    (pause) That's a good answer.

    Tags

  • 30

    Interview: Apr 17th, 2011

    Terez (Callandor)

    Who ordered the attack on Demira Eriff in Lord of Chaos?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I'm going to RAFO that one.

    Footnote

    It was Fain.

    Tags

  • 31

    Interview: Apr 17th, 2011

    Terez (herid)

    If Taim already knew how to ignore heat, why did he shave his beard? (Because of the way he read it.) That's not my question.

    Brandon Sanderson

    I have no idea.

    Terez

    (laughs) I didn't figure you would.

    Brandon Sanderson

    That's a pretty random question. I don't even think that's in the notes; I'll be honest with you....that's really not the sort of thing Jim put in his notes, so I'm guessing...I can MAFO that one, if you want to ask Maria, but I really don't know.

    Maria Simons

    I don't know either.

    Tags

  • 32

    Interview: Oct 21st, 1994

    AOL Chat 1 (Verbatim)

    BelaHorse

    Why did you choose to go with such an experimental style for Lord of Chaos? It seems to me that Lord of Chaos is really just half a book. Many characters become more fully fleshed out but very little happens. Some characters seem to develop positively, others negatively—but all within a framework of "wait, wait, wait..." How did you choose this approach?

    Robert Jordan

    Sorry—that's just the way it worked out.

    Footnote

    If the concept of Lord of Chaos being 'half a book' confuses you, see the footnote of this Q&A from Erica Sadun's signing report.

    Tags

  • 33

    Interview: Feb 26th, 2012

    sleepinghour (@322)

    Question for those in the know: is the written content in the WoT ARCs or galley copies any different from the retail version? Any changed lines or new/missing parts?

    I own a few ARCs of other books, and they don't seem any different from the retail version (as far as I can tell), but reviewers were asked to make sure any quoted text matched with the final version.

    Kafmerchant (@323)

    For the various versions that I have of this series, the results are all over the place; here are few examples:

    A lot of the pre-publication versions I have such as The Great Hunt, The Dragon Reborn, The Fires of Heaven, Winter's Heart and Knife of Dreams have no obvious noticeable differences from the retail versions (although I haven't read through each in great detail so as to not damage them).

    The galley for The Shadow Rising has a prologue of approximately 1.5 pages that was integrated into the first chapter of the finished book.

    The advance version (2-book set) for Lord of Chaos has line edits, handwritten notes including some chapter titles written in and notes of what icon is to be used for certain chapters.

    For The Path of Daggers, the book I have is labeled as an advance uncorrected bound manuscript that includes tons of changes: many, many line edits, actual chapter revision numbers, and in one spot, a chapter was moved to a different sequence in the book, and that's just what I noticed scanning through it quickly a few years ago.

    My intention always has been, if/whenever I get the time to do a detailed review of each book, but that maybe just a pipe dream as I own a small business that consumes my life.

    I started discussing some of this with Bob Kluttz of Encyclopaedia-Wot a few years ago in order to try get some info posted on-line, but I don't have the time to do the work nor the space or skills to post the info.

    Hope this helps a little.

    JD

    Tags

  • 34

    Interview: Dec 17th, 2011

    Loialson

    In Lord of Chaos, Nynaeve and Elayne searched for something that would tie the Salidar Aes Sedai to Rand via Need in Tel'aran'rhiod.

    Need led them to three things. First it led them to the White Tower, (where Elayne glimpsed Egwene briefly), then Need shifted Nynaeve and Elayne to a locked storeroom within the White Tower (they thought that was useless). After that, Need led them to the Bowl of the Winds. My questions are regarding the first two things Need brought them to.

    On the first thing, was Need bringing them to Egwene?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I believe it was Egwene.

    LOIALSON

    On the second thing, what was the item Need brought them to in that storeroom?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    RAFO.

    LOIALSON

    Was that something besides the Horn of Valere?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    It could be.

    LOIALSON

    [I felt that this question was grasping at straws here a bit from the impression I got from him, i.e. it's not that important regarding what the item is, but that it will come into play. And it's not the Horn of Valere in this case. I could be wrong, that's just the vibe I got.]

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  • 35

    Interview: Nov 4th, 2005

    Saladdodger

    First I want to applaud the OP for a well thought out theory supported by evidence. I have enjoyed the debate on this topic.

    Now the bad news: I attended the Robert Jordan book signing here in Charlotte, NC tonight (11/4/05). While he was signing my books, I asked him if he could credit or discredit the theory that the Dark One charged Demandred with the task of wielding Balefire in an attempt to weaken the Pattern, so that the Dark One may be have a better chance of victory at Tarmon Gai'don.

    Robert Jordan

    He didn't quite understand my point and asked me to explain it again. When I did, alluding to the consequences of Balefire, and quoting the Dark One's asking Demandred about his willingness to use balefire for the Dark One, he quickly shook his head and gave an unequivocal no.

    SALADDODGER

    I'm afraid this theory is disproved by the word of Robert Jordan himself.

    Footnote

    It's clear enough from other reports and also from comments by Brandon that the theory was not precisely disproven. RJ probably meant that Demandred was not the one doing the balefiring, which fits with Brandon's comments.

    Tags

  • 36

    Interview: Oct 29th, 2005

    Congo Red Jr.

    Well I asked Mr. Jordan about this theory, in brief, at a booksigning in Santa Cruz. I did this while getting my books autographed.

    Robert Jordan

    He said the Forsaken are using balefire to help unravel the Pattern. That was all he'd say on it, told me the books provide enough evidence for it.

    CONGO RED JR.

    At any rate I'm not sure whether or not this helps anyone's arguments as I haven't read all of them; y'all write too much.

    Tags

  • 37

    Interview: Oct 29th, 2005

    sporkster (comment 70)

    So—one Jordan booksigning against the theory, and one for. Sounds like we can't put this theory in the "Debunked" pile yet...

    CONGO RED JR. (COMMENT 71)

    I suppose it's possible that Mr. Jordan may not have fully understood my question and therefore his answer isn't exactly for or against this theory. LOL The question I asked was this: Have the Forsaken, Demandred specifically, used balefire to destabilize the Pattern at all?

    Robert Jordan

    He said that they've used balefire and the consequences were destabilizing the Pattern and that in the books you could see evidence of that.

    CONGO RED JR.

    I should've been more specific in my question to him and my post here; that was first time I've ever commented on a message board, etc. I'm usually just a reader/browser to forums and such. I personally think the other fella's question was more specific therefore the answer probably more accurate as pertaining to the topic at hand. The answer he gave me upon further reflection could mean any number of things. It's hard to say. Guess we'll all find out when A Memory of Light is published.

    Footnote

    Actually, it appears that both answers might have been accurate in their original form, and that the Forsaken have indeed been using balefire, but that Demandred is not one of them. In any case, Brandon's comments on this theory make it almost certain that balefire is the main cause of the disintegration of the Pattern.

    Tags

  • 38

    Interview: Apr, 2012

    Luckers

    Sammael claims to have a truce with Rand, even though we see Rand turn him down. Was Sammael lying, or did...

    Brandon Sanderson

    I’m fairly sure he was lying. As in, I’ve seen something in the notes at one point, and I’m pretty sure it was... but my memory being what it is, I will say you can MAFO that. But I’m pretty sure he was lying.

    Maria Simons

    Sammael was lying in an attempt to manipulate Graendal.

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  • 39

    Interview: Jan 9th, 2013

    Mike Cockrum

    During book 6 or 7, I forget which, one of the supergirls did a Need walk in Tel'aran'rhiod to find something to do with The One Power that would help Rand. The end result of this was them discovering the Bowl of the Winds. First, though, she went to the Objects of Power storeroom of the White Tower. What was the thing in the Tower?

    Brandon Sanderson (paraphrased)

    He passed the question to Maria, who didn't know. I asked if it was The Horn of Valere. He said he wasn't sure, but he always thought it was The Horn.

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  • 40

    Interview: Feb 1st, 2013

    Question

    Do you know what the Tinkers meant in the [sixth] book, as they were dying and they said "tell the Dragon Reborn"?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I don't know. It might be in the notes. When I say "RJ's notes", it means one of two things. It is either a pile that his assistants collected, or the things he wrote for himself about the world. I'd ask Harriet and Maria a question, and they'd act like Google. Reading it all myself would've taken months, and the majority is about stuff already written and known. But really, I have no idea what you're talking about.

    Footnote

    This is in reference to a scene in Lord of Chaos where Vanin finds a slaughtered Tinker caravan with the indicated message. Matt Hatch clarified the question with Brandon after the Q&A. Brandon said that he didn't know if it meant something more than literally telling the Dragon Reborn about their deaths, but that it might be in the notes.

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  • 41

    Interview: Apr 20th, 2013

    Terez

    Who had Herid Fel killed?

    Maria Simons

    That was A Crown of Swords right?

    Terez

    It was in the epilogue of Lord of Chaos. They found out about it in A Crown of Swords. And it was the gholam. So it had to be—

    Maria Simons

    Sammael, yeah. That was Sammael.

    Terez

    Do you know the reason?

    Maria Simons

    Because he somehow learned that Fel was helping Rand and didn't want the information...?

    Terez

    A friend of mine has a theory; he believed that Herid Fel was Asmodean in disguise, because he didn't believe Asmodean was dead.

    Maria Simons

    That's a good theory! I like that theory.

    Terez

    I like it too! Because it would explain a lot... (including why a gholam was sent to kill a non-channeler)

    Maria Simons

    Yeah.

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  • 42

    Interview: Apr 20th, 2013

    Terez

    So who was responsible for the murdered Tinkers (in Lord of Chaos Chapter 22, discovered by Vanin)?

    Maria Simons

    I don't know that one.

    Terez

    It's not in the notes?

    Maria Simons

    Not that I have found. Searching the notes is....it's an imperfect science. Like if it's a rare character, it's real easy, because I open my desktop search, and I put in that name and not much comes up, but you put in "Tinkers"...you know, there are hundreds of files where the Tinkers are mentioned. If I had one of them's name? You know. I'm hoping to find out; I'm still finding new little bits and pieces here and there, so...

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