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Your search for the tag 'maps' yielded 31 results

  • 1

    Interview: 1994

    Grey Culberson

    Did the map come before you established the travels of the Randlanders or the other way around?

    Robert Jordan

    RJ had drawn a rough map of Randland before he started writing the series.

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  • 2

    Interview: Oct 17th, 1994

    Daniel Rouk (18 October 1994)

    There were some really interesting collector's items to be signed. One ex-Tor representative (who says he remembers you, Patrick) had Advanced Reading Copies from The Eye of the World. The Eye of the World's and The Great Hunt's advance copies were both nicely bound with cover art on them. From The Dragon Reborn on they are bound in yellow or red construction paper. The first three advance copies seem to be single-spaced single volumes. I don't know about the others, but Lord of Chaos's advance bound copy was double-spaced and in two volumes. Another fellow had a large fold-out map that was included in one of the advance copies. It was black and white, and Jordan said it is an early copy from which the modern maps were made. I noticed attractive drawings of several places along the border. One I think was Tar Valon.

    Robert Jordan

    The recent freebie first half of The Eye of the World was the impetus that got his elder brother to read the books. Apparently his older brother doesn't read much fantasy, and hadn't read any of Jordan's books until he saw the freebie in the store and picked it up.

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  • 3

    Interview: Jul 14th, 2005

    ComicCon Reports (Paraphrased)

    Robert Jordan

    Randland maps—He insists it was not inspired by the Middle Earth map. He wrote The Eye of the World with no illustrations but Tom Doherty insisted on a map. RJ sketched out his mental image, placing the nations where he envisaged them. He sent the sketch to a friend, John M. Ford, who did the black and white map from The Eye of the World. Tom Canty did the color version used for the endpapers. A similar story for the city maps—when really needed, he did a rough sketch and passed it on to another friend, Ellisa Mitchell.

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  • 4

    Interview: Jul 14th, 2005

    Question

    One person asked, rather impertinently I thought, if RJ had ripped off Tolkien's Middle-Earth map when he created his own.

    Robert Jordan

    Of course, RJ denied that, and said that after he had handed in The Eye of the World, he was asked to provide a map. "Why do you need a map?" RJ asked, and he was told, "Tom Doherty likes maps." So, RJ slapped a couple pieces of paper together and drew in the mountains, then scattered the countries around, added some cities rivers and other geographical features and sent it off to Tor. Tor revised it a number of times until Elise Mitchell produced the version that became part of The Eye of the World. RJ also stated that if you look at a map of southwestern Saudi Arabia you'll see two mountain ranges that intersect at right angles.

    When asked how aware of geography he was while writing, RJ said that he created the city maps whole, but only roughed out the larger ones. The bigger ones were then polished by the people at Tor before being printed in the books. I took it to mean that he wasn't all that concerned with larger geographic features, which might explain some of the geographic discrepencies in the story.

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  • 5

    Interview: Oct 24th, 2005

    Question

    The first girl to ask a question asked, "Why is it that the most powerful women in the world perceive their power as stemming from a 'pale, white shaft'?"

    Robert Jordan

    RJ chuckled, and then said if you "missed the symbolism there, you just don't get it." He also said that if their power came from a "hole in the ground" it just wouldn't be as much fun, and they would only be feared if you thought you might "fall in", which would not be much fun, he assured us.

    Footnote

    This question was also asked by Fomu and Jarrod, and the latter report seems to make it clear that RJ was referencing the map of Tar Valon.

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  • 6

    Interview: Oct 24th, 2005

    Jarrod

    Eventually Mr. Jordan turned to his quest of finding females that wanted some questions answered and got a good one when a lady asked why the most powerful women in the world get their power in a pale, white shaft (the White Tower).

    Robert Jordan

    The answer was, "If you can't grasp the symbolism, my dear... Because I thought about having them have their center of power be a hole in the ground and I thought it wasn't really going to be as significant. It wasn't going to stand out and have people say 'Wow, Gee...look at that on the horizon'. You sorta have to walk to the edge and say, 'Welp, don't wanna fall off into that, now do you?'"

    Footnote

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  • 7

    Interview: Oct 21st, 1994

    AOL Chat 2 (Verbatim)

    Question

    Are you ever going to expand the existing map and perhaps open up the lands east of the Spine of the World?

    Robert Jordan

    There are no known maps of the Aiel Waste. That has been established.

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  • 8

    Interview: Apr 15th, 2009

    Patrick

    Do you do your own drawings, sketches and pictures?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes, though depending on the book, I may have an artist redraw them in order to give a certain stylistic feel to the visuals. In Elantris, I did the symbols myself, but in Mistborn the talented Isaac Stewart did them for me. I always have someone redraw the maps for me.

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  • 9

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Liago

    Paul recently wrote an article about loving maps in stories and it inspired these questions from me.

    How do you come up with and create the maps for your novels? Is it a process of thought while creating the story itself or does it come later once you've written the story as a means to depict the places you've written about? Also do you scetch them yourself before having them drawn or is the process usually entirely done by a separate artist?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I usually sketch myself out something vague to use as reference, then make it more and more detailed as I work through the book. At that point, I approach and artist and have them help me come up with a good visual style for the book and the map. If it's an artist I know well, I can sometimes let them do more of the work—the Mistborn maps, for instance, were developed by Isaac with very little input from me beyond the text and some basic instructions.

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  • 10

    Interview: Aug 4th, 2011

    Question

    Isaac, how closely do you work with someone like Brandon when you make the maps?

    Isaac Stewart

    Pretty closely. Brandon has a lot of say of what's on there, because of course it's his world. So I defer to him or Peter in everything as far as the maps come out.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yeah, but he adds a lot himself. He's really good, so we give him free reign. My favorite thing that he did in Way of Kings, there's actually a map that is of the warcamps, the ten warcamps if you look at that one. And it's actually done in the style as if a famous artist came and toured them and then went home and did an idealized representation of them, and so you can read, you know "done by the artist blah blah blah". But the fun thing, Isaac kind of just did this, is yeah, I figured since he's probably got this big ego he's going to name stuff after himself, so there's a river that's named after the artist. That's not really, the artist just put it in his artwork as being named after him and you just have to notice this. You have to look and say, "by the artist such-and-such" and then at the bottom in the description is "and that goes past the mighty river..." what's his name? Vandonas, yes. Stuff like that where he's just naming stuff after himself. Yeah, Isaac gets a lot of free reign to do things like that because all the art, particularly from Way of Kings we wanted to be in-world and so the different artists doing them have different personalities and different goals. One is, you know, an official survey and another is an idealized representation, and everything in between. So you have to wear a bunch of different hats like I do when I write a book. He was becoming different artists.

    Isaac Stewart

    It's also fun too because Brandon will say things like "eh... there's a bunch of cities over here. Why don't you name them and I'll see if they fit." So there's some cities on the Way of Kings map I wrote down and he let them stay there. Who knows if people will actually go there.

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  • 11

    Interview: Nov 15th, 2011

    Brandon Sanderson

    Several readers have reported that the ebook version of The Alloy of Law has images that are hard to read. Tor is working on a solution right now, but in the meantime, I've uploaded all of the images to their own page here. You can see them below. I'm including a color version of the Elendel city map (by Isaac Stewart, who also runs the Mistborn and Stormlight Archive T-shirt store) that doesn't appear in the book. And you can download a full-resolution broadsheet PDF if you are a Tor.com member. By the way, broadsheet (and Shallan's sketchbook) artist Ben McSweeney will be with me at my Houston signing today, so fortunate readers there can get his autograph as well.

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  • 12

    Interview: 2011

    Twitter 2011 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Felix Pax (13 December 2011)

    Regarding the map of WoT, if a place is named, as a reader, at some point I expect that place to be written about.

    Brandon Sanderson (13 December 2011)

    Actually, I prefer there to be lots of names on my maps that are never mentioned or written about.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    If every point on the map is story-related, I feel it makes the map feel contrived.

    FELIX PAX

    I take that sentence of yours to mean, you don't care for RJ's map structure very much at all.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    That is not what it means at all, Felix. It means only what I said. "I'm unlikely to explain places RJ didn't give backstory."

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    My reasoning being that he left them with little or no explanation for a reason, in order to be more realistic.

    FELIX PAX

    Realistic or easy for an author?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I guess we're looking at it differently. I feel there are many places that haven't been explored or had more than a mention.

    Footnote

    Felix's comments were probably related to this argument. But, since it's Felix, only tangentially.

    Tags

    maps,
  • 13

    Interview: Oct, 2008

    Dalenthas (15 October 2008)

    Will we get a map of what the new world? Or do we have to wait for the next trilogy, whenever that may be?

    Brandon Sanderson (16 October 2008)

    You'll have to wait, I'm afraid. The future series is still far off. I can't dedicate resources to getting a map drawn up until I begin work on the series officially.

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  • 14

    Interview: Apr, 2012

    Eleanor

    What is the exact location of the Fields of Merrilor?

    Brandon Sanderson

    There will be a map in A Memory of Light. (Added something along the lines about not being aware of debate on the location.)

    ELEANOR

    I wish I'd had the full background on the debate on this one with me. As it was, I didn't have enough to describe with any clarity. I know the basics of the contradiction but not the full story.

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  • 15

    Interview: Apr 9th, 2012

    Trevor Green

    I think a lot of people have little to no knowledge of how a professional-grade fantasy map comes about. How do you go about designing a world based off an author's ideas? Do you just throw some stuff onto a squiggly coastline and call it good?

    Isaac Stewart

    Making a map is quite the process. I read the book and make location notes (sometimes I find myself noting geographic references in books I'm just reading for fun—it's become a habit). I really try to make the map match the tone of the book and to make it more than just something for the reader to keep track of where the characters are. I've brought back maps from many of the real-world countries I've visited. I've marked on them where I've been. I've planned trips on them and dreamed about going to some of the places. Fantasy maps are the same way. They're a real thing—souvenirs that the reader can bring back with them when they're done visiting the book.

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  • 16

    Interview: Aug 8th, 2009

    WorldCon 2009 - Dom (Paraphrased)

    Dom

    Brandon Sanderson

    About Harriet, Brandon revealed that not only did she provide most of the chapter titles and decide on the icons and maps (which we already knew) but she is also the one who handled the titles for most of the books. So those multi-layered titles that fit the main themes of each book and the opening quotes so well, or bring back metaphors or details from earlier books are actually hers, not RJ. Exceptionally, he's the one who came up with A Memory of Light for the last book as he was working on it. Normally it's Harriet who came up with a title after reading the full manuscript.

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  • 17

    Interview: Oct 18th, 2004

    Brandon Sanderson

    Anyway, back to the chapter. I planned from the beginning for Sarene to give Raoden this vital bit of information about the magic system. As I've said before, she represents chaos—and chaos isn't always a bad thing. She is able to give Raoden the one simple bit of information that, despite all of his studying, he hasn't been able to find.

    I worry, now that we have the map, that the Chasm answer is too obvious. Jeff made the Chasm a lot bigger than I intended it to be. And, since we zoomed in on the map so much, the Chasm dominates a large section of what we see.

    Fortunately, I think it's the very next Triad where Raoden figures out how to use Sarene's bit of information. We don't have to wait long for him to figure out the secret—so, hopefully, if the readers figure it out, they won't feel Raoden is too stupid for taking so long.

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  • 18

    Interview: Oct 18th, 2004

    Brandon Sanderson

    My biggest worry about these chapters is that people will look at the map we put in the front of the book and realize that it doesn't match the text. I really do like Jeff's map—it's well-drawn, and it has a very cool feel to it. I love the little city designs; they give the map a different feel from many fantasy maps. Overall, I think this map fits the 'mood' of the book quite well.

    However, I myself didn't give him good enough instructions on how to develop the map, and now it doesn't completely fit what I talk about in the text. Since the landscape of the land is so important to the development of the book and the magic system, this could be a problem for some readers.

    Anyway, yes, Raoden makes the connection here. The Chasm line is what has been missing all along. I tried to emphasize the Chasm several times in the text, reminding people that it's around. However, as I may have said in other annotations (the spoiler sections), I now worry that the Chasm is TOO obvious. Anyway, I suspect the discovery will work for some people, and not work for others. Hopefully, the characterizations and the events in the book are interesting enough that even if some people think this discovery is obvious, they'll enjoy reading anyway.

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  • 19

    Interview: Jul 29th, 2006

    Brandon Sanderson (Maps)

    I haven't actually seen the map yet. I'm curious to see how it turns out. . . .

    The person doing it is Isaac Stewart, a guy in one of my writing groups. He's a man of many talents, and works as an animator. He was very excited about MISTBORN, and when I mentioned he could do the map, he was enthusiastic. I've heard a lot of what he's talked about with the book—doing a map that is based on old Victorian-era maps of London and Paris. We'll see what he comes up with!

    EDIT: Now I've seen the maps!

    Wow, Isaac did a wonderful job with these. One of the things I asked for was a round world map, and he really stepped up. I love the embellishments around the border and the illuminated manuscript type feel for it.

    The city map is probably more important to the story. Oddly, I didn't actually do one of these when I was writing the novel. In fact, I only had a very basic sketch for the world map. That meant, of course, that when I sat down with one of the later drafts, some things were inconsistent. It also meant that a lot of things on the map weren't named, such as the gates.

    I owe a lot to Isaac on this one. His intricate map is very detailed—each of those slums was hand-drawn with the insane twisting of all the little streets. He was the one who named the gates, building eight of them and naming them after the basic Allomantic metals. All and all, he did a fantastic job. Make sure to check out his website, Isaacstewart.com

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  • 20

    Interview: Apr 9th, 2012

    Trevor Green

    What are some of the books you've been a part of, and what exactly were you in charge of?

    Isaac Stewart

    I’m responsible for all the maps and symbols in the four (so far) Mistborn novels as well as all the symbols, chapter headings, maps, color end pages, and Navani's notebook pages in Brandon's Way of Kings. (The other artwork in the book was done by Michael Whelan, Ben McSweeney, and Ben Call. I'm thrilled to be showcased in the same book with these amazing artists.)

    On the design side of things, I've been designing self-published books—covers and interiors—for a while, but recently had the luck to get into the business professionally with the book design for Bryce Moore's YA novel, Vodnik. I've also done covers for some ebook re-releases of some science fiction and fantasy classics from the 80s.

    In addition to Brandon's maps, I've also worked on maps in the re-release of Robert Silverberg's Nebula-winning novel A Time of Changes and the upcoming reprint of his very-enjoyable Downward to the Earth.

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  • 21

    Interview: Apr 9th, 2012

    Trevor Green

    What's the first thing you'd tell someone looking to get into designing maps and artwork for fiction?

    Isaac Stewart

    Join the cartographersguild.com. See what's being done today. Work on your craft. Study real maps. Study fantasy maps. Work on your craft some more. Put together a half dozen examples, then start meeting editors, art directors, and authors at conventions. Study the masters of illustration. Work on your craft until your fingers bleed. Find out the art submission guidelines for publishers and submit your portfolio. Draw, draw, draw, draw, draw. Enter your artwork into the shows at conventions. Paint, draw, and keep on working hard.

    It's a difficult industry to break into. It's even more difficult if you want to make a living creating artwork. But one thing remains the same. If you are excellent at your craft and you're putting yourself out there, you will find those willing to pay you to create artwork.

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  • 22

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2012

    Daily Dragon

    Shallan's sketches in The Way of Kings are terrific additions that enhance the epic feel of the novel. What inspired you to push for these illustrations?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I wanted to use the form of this novel to try and enhance what epic fantasy can do, and downplay the things that are tough about it. One of the tough things about epic fantasy is the learning curve—how much you have to learn and pay attention to, how many things there are to just know. I felt that occasional illustrations could really help with that. For instance, how Shallan's sketchbook, or uses of multiple maps, could give us a visual component to the book. Pictures really are worth a thousand words. You can have on that page something that shows a creature much better than I can describe it. And so I felt that that would help deemphasize the problem of the learning curve, while at the same time helping to make this world real. Epic fantasy is about immersion, and I wanted to make this world real since that's one of the great things we can do with epic fantasy. We've got the space and the room to just build a completely real world, and I felt that the art would allow me to do that, which is why I decided to do "in world" art.

    I didn't want to take this toward a graphic novel. I like graphic novels, but it wasn't appropriate here to do illustrations of the scenes and characters from the books because I don't want to tell you what they look like. I want that to be up to your own imagination. And so we wanted that in-world ephemera feel to it, as though it were some piece of art that you found in the world and included.

    I think it goes back to Tolkien. There's a map in The Hobbit, and that map isn't just a random map, which has become almost a cliché of fantasy books and of epic fantasy. "Oh, of course there's a random map in the front!" Well, Tolkien wanted you to think this map was the actual map the characters carried around, and that's why he included it. He wrote his books as if he were the archivist putting them together and translating them and bringing them to you, this wonderful story from another world, and he included the map because the map was there with the notes. That's what I wanted the feel for this ephemera to be. As though whoever has put this book together—done the translation and included pieces of art and maps and things that they found in the world that had been collected during these events—that's what you're getting.

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  • 23

    Interview: Feb 20th, 2013

    Question

    I was amazed by the language, geography, people, and so on in the books, and I always wondered what Robert Jordan's office looked like. I thought it must be covered with maps and things relating to the books. What was it like to walk in there?

    Harriet McDougal

    What you saw first when you walked in was a plastic human skeleton. And it wears a Viking helmet. And then you saw the books. There was a bookcase filled with books on religions. There was another bookcase of Westerns. There was a very big printer, and a roll-top desk. But what there weren't were maps. They were all in his head.

    Brandon Sanderson

    There were a lot of weapons, though.

    Harriet McDougal

    There was a room full of edged weapons!

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  • 24

    Interview: Aug 23rd, 2014

    Harriet McDougal (paraphrased)

    The Wheel of Time Encyclopedia is dead! Long live The Wheel of Time Companion as it will now officially be called.

    The book will be 350,000 words long (comparable to several of the novels in the series; the longest, The Shadow Rising, is 389,000 words).

    The book will feature a lot of new artwork, arranged by Irene Gallo at Tor.

    Publication date likely to be November 2015.

    The book will feature all of the already-published maps and also some new ones, including one of Thakan'dar.

    The book will have a large vocabulary of the Old Tongue, with a minimum of 1,000 words.

    The book will feature character profiles and sketches for almost every character in the series. Even Bela has her own entry.

    The book will be written from a post-AMoL POV. It will have spoilers for the entire series.

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  • 25

    Interview: Mar 8th, 2014

    AhoyMatey

    Is there anything that I should have asked that I didn't?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Probably not... Do you know if anyone has figured out the hidden things in the map of Roshar?

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  • 26

    Interview: Mar 19th, 2014

    Question

    Which map holds the Easter Egg?

    Brandon Sanderson

    The main map of Roshar.

    Question

    From which book?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Either book, it's the main one that will go in each copy. It's VERY hard and it won't change a whole lot.

    Question

    Does it have anything to do with the compass?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Not the compass.

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  • 27

    Interview: Mar 20th, 2014

    Shicaca ()

    I was looking at the map of Roshar and it kinda looked like a spiral galaxy to me, like it was flipping a certain way.

    Brandon Sanderson

    That was intentional. You are on to something that no one's figured out yet.

    Shicaca

    I was thinking it could be connected to people being able to manipulate gravity.

    Brandon Sanderson

    It's not exactly what you think you're on to, but you're getting close to something that they've all wanted to know for a while.

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  • 28

    Interview: Mar 29th, 2014

    Question

    Can you give me a hint in the easter egg in the map of Roshar? What particular skill do you need for it? Is it a different language or math related?

    Brandon Sanderson

    It's not linguistics. It is math related. Let me remind you this is not going to be a mind blowing revelation. It is going to be a nifty thing. Someone actually got close at one of my signings. They noticed something. But it is a fun easter egg that will tell you more about the history of the world.

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  • 29

    Interview: Apr 16th, 2014

    Question

    Any hints at the thing hiding in the maps of Roshar?

    Brandon Sanderson

    The map of Roshar, what hints can I give you? The same thing is hiding in all of the maps of Roshar. All of the ones we have done so far have the same thing.

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