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Your search for the tag 'rj on music' yielded 17 results

  • 1

    Interview: Jan, 1991

    Starlog Interview (Verbatim)

    William B. Thompson

    Since the books meld elements of Celtic, Norse, Middle Eastern and American Indian myth in a largely Medieval setting, obligatory comparisons with J.R.R. Tolkien surfaced almost immediately. Jordan accepts them with resigned good humor.

    Robert Jordan

    "On the one hand, I'm flattered. On the other, I would have to say it's overplayed. On the third hand, Tolkien encompassed so much in The Lord of the Rings and other books that he did for fantasy what Beethoven did for music.

    "For a long time, it was believed that no one did anything that did not build on Beethoven. For his part, Tolkien did provide a foundation while himself building on an existing tradition. Although it's difficult now to forge a singular place in this foundation, people like Stephen R. Donaldson are doing it. I hope I am as well."

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  • 2

    Interview: Nov 21st, 1994

    6. I'll give 10,000 Maniacs a try, if I can find a CD or tape in my copious free time, and also Ms. Merchant solo. As for Scott, I'll bet he doesn't!

    7. There are answers/replies or partial answers/replies to most of your questions in what is already published, through Lord of Chaos. For the rest.... You know the answer. All together, now...

    Yes, my wife was the one who had heart surgery. Not a heart attack, though. She is perfectly recovered.

    With best wishes,

    I remain,

    Sincerely,

    Robert Jordan

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  • 3

    Interview: Jun 26th, 1996

    Compuserve Chat (Verbatim)

    Lauryn

    I love the song lyrics in your books. Do you write songs and music other than in the books?

    Robert Jordan

    No, not at all I'm afraid. Some poetry to my wife now and then, that's all.

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  • 4

    Interview: Oct, 1998

    Sense of Wonder

    In a field where J.R.R. Tolkien has been used as a yardstick that leaves most authors far behind, the notoriously discriminating New York Times says you have come to dominate the world Tolkien began to reveal. As your Wheel of Time series has grown, the richness and compelling nature of your creation has also been favorably compared with that of other great masters in creative fields, including the Brothers Grimm, Aldous Huxley, Stephen King, Michael Moorcock, Frank Herbert, Robert Heinlein, and Beethoven! You are part of a distinguished heritage. What do you feel is most distinctive about your work?

    Robert Jordan

    Well, I believe I write with a distinctly American voice, and a distinctly Southern one to boot. There is a great story-telling tradition in the South. My grandfather, father, and uncles were all raconteurs, and I grew up listening to their stories, as well as those of other men. There's a touch of oral tradition in my writing. Maybe that's where Beethoven comes in. A spoken story must flow musically, in words and in structure. I believe that my fiction reads as if it were meant to be read aloud. It certainly goes well in the unabridged audiotape versions. In short, it is a matter of time and place and experience. I grew up in a different place and in a different way from any of those men, and lived a different life. I am none of those men, could not be, and don't want to be. I am myself.

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  • 5

    Interview: Nov 11th, 1998

    Talisein

    Speaking of your wife reminded me. Are you planning on updating the telephone message thing at TOR after you're done with your tour? And what's that piano I hear in the background on the recording that's there now?

    Robert Jordan

    I don't know what the piano music is except that I generally play classical music when I am working. I listen to Jazz, Rock, Country, various music—Deco, all sorts of things when I am relaxing—but I have to work to Classical and since I changed the CDs out I really couldn't tell you what particular piece it is. And as for updating the message, I will. I am told that the subject was broached while I was still working on the book—not to me—and the question was raised as to whether it was better for me to spend time updating the message or to go ahead and work. Since even a ten-minute break can mean an hour or more getting back into the flows and rhythms, apparently the decision reached was don't bother the man!

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  • 6

    Interview: Nov 11th, 2000

    Jiri Kristek from The Czech Rep.

    Mr. Jordan How many hours per day do you approximately spend writing, and do you listen to music meanwhile or do you prefer the silence?

    Robert Jordan

    I usually write to classical music of various kinds, and occasionally Chinese or Japanese music. I like to listen to rock and to jazz, but I can't write to them. As for the number of hours, I try to do at least eight hours a day, six or seven days a week. When the schedule gets very hectic, that can grow to twelve hours a day seven days a week, and no time off.

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  • 7

    Interview: Jan 16th, 2003

    Robert Jordan

    He listens to music while he writes. Usually classical, but also ethnic music occasionally. When he's not writing he likes jazz and old-style country. He also likes the latest music from Johnny Cash and Willie Nelson now that they don't care what people think any more.

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  • 8

    Interview: Sep, 2005

    Glas Durboraw

    Let's see...what sort of music do you listen to? Do you listen to music when you write?

    Robert Jordan

    I listen to music when I write. In the time that I'm doing my email and taking phone calls, I listen to jazz, I might listen to rock, I might listen to reggae, it might be rap, it might be some third world music. There's some good sort of jazz fusion stuff—I'm not sure what exactly you'd call it—coming out of various north African nations, and I have some Latin nations...a lot of different stuff. I just grab something at random, and tuck a couple of CDs in there, or a CD to cover that. Then when I began writing, it pulls down classical music of various kinds, very few vocals unless it's in a foreign language. Carmina Burana works well, because it's in Latin...and maybe other things, Japanese drums, Chinese flute...you know, that can get into that mix, it doesn't interfere. I can't write to the jazz or the rock. I can't write to vocals that I understand. I get into a focus when I am writing so that I am absolutely, totally, 100% focused on that writing.

    I have a window on the right side of my desk that looks out over what we call the side garden. If I turn my head slightly to the left, I'm looking at a door that's made up of little glass panes looking out into what we call the long garden—that's where the driveway runs through the back to the garage—and I can remember a day when I got up and walked outside into the long garden, and I looked around, and it amazed me, because not only was everything wet...there were branches that were drooping and dripping water, I mean they were so heavy with water that some branches were drooping. There were broken branches as much as two inches in diameter, I think there was one that was as much as three inches in diameter, lying in the driveway. We'd had a major rainstorm—a major windstorm—and I hadn't known it. I was that tight into the work, that I didn't hear the wind, I didn't hear the rain, I didn't see any of it. It was just the work, and I didn't know it till I went outside.

    Glas Durboraw

    In a sense, I wonder if that's why readers again so easily get that suspension of everything as they lose themselves in the work as a reader.

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  • 9

    Interview: Nov 22nd, 2005

    Robert Jordan

    Thanks for the CD, Deadsy. I liked it. It seems very reminiscent of Pentangle at times, but then a lot of groups do. I saw an article somewhere or other that claimed Pentangle had more influence on the music that followed than the Beatles and as much as the Beachboys. The second is quite a claim to make. Remarkable for a group that did two albums—nybody out there old enough to remember vinyl? Hey, I still have some of my 45s!—in the late 60s then vanished.

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  • 10

    Interview: Dec 19th, 2005

    Robert Jordan

    First off, thanks to NaClH2O and to Anonymous. I didn't know that Pentangle had gone on beyond their first two albums. I remember walking down the corridor in my hooch in Nam and hearing music coming from a doorway that made me duck in and ask who it was. The next time I could get by the Air Force PX, I picked up Pentangle, and later the second album. After that, I heard nothing, so I suppose I simply assumed they had vanished like so many other musicians. They're like writers, you know. I can't recall the number of albums I've listened to with excitement, like the first novels I've read with excitement, only to never hear from the artist again. In any case, I'll look up the early Pentangle stuff on CD and hope the others are as good as those first two. As for Anonymous nominating Fairport Convention as heavily influential on the music that followed, they just don't make the cut. I heard Fairport Convention when they first came out, as well as later, and never thought I was listening to anything that was coming close to the envelope much less pushing it. When I heard those first few notes from Pentangle, they stopped me dead. I knew it then. Envelope? Forget the stinking envelope, gringo. These guys were so far beyond the envelope, the light from the envelope was a rapidly diminishing flicker in their wake, struggling hopelessly to catch up. Over the horizon? They were over the event horizon and out the other side. Today, maybe it wouldn't sound so fresh, but the fact is, where rock ventures today, Pentangle was running for the sunrise better than thirty years ago. That's why so often when I listen, I find myself thinking, been there, heard that, long time gone.

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  • 11

    Interview: Jul 14th, 2006

    Robert Jordan

    For Deadsy, I have occasionally played AT tennis, but I don't play the game. My knees don't hold up well under lateral motion any more. And as for Tori Amos, to the best of my knowledge I've never listened to anything by her.

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  • 12

    Interview: Dec, 2006

    Question

    You are stranded on a desert island with only one book, one CD, and one DVD—what are they?

    Robert Jordan

    The one book would be whatever book I was currently writing. I mean, I hate falling behind in the work. The one CD would contain the best encyclopedia I could find on desert island survival. The DVD would contain as much of Beethoven, Mozart, and Duke Ellington as I could cram onto it.

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  • 13

    Interview: Dec, 2006

    Question

    Describe the perfect writing environment.

    Robert Jordan

    Any place that has my computer, a CD player for music, a comfortable chair that won't leave me with a backache at the end of a long day, and very little interruption.

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  • 14

    Interview: 2001

    Thus Spake the Creator (Paraphrased)

    Reporter (Robert Jordan Himself)

    What kind of music do you listen to?

    Robert Jordan

    Works to classical. Listens to South African, Japanese, some country music, etc. He said (quite seriously) ‘everything under the sun’. Except for punk music.

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  • 15

    Interview: Apr 10th, 2001

    Kurafire

    Do you enjoy listening to music, and if so does it aid you in acquiring inspiration for your writing?

    Robert Jordan

    In many ways, yes, I listen to every sort of music. Classical, Rock, Jazz, Country, Western, Ethnic music from various countries... I do not write to Jazz, or Rock. I like all country western, I like to listen to it, or blues, but I can’t write to it. I write, or at least maybe I can write to some Jazz, I mainly write to classical music, and some jazz. I usually have music playing when I write.

    Kurafire

    If a well-known composer would like to compose a musical score for your entire books, what would your opinion about that be? Would you like it?

    Robert Jordan

    I’d be very interested to see what he or she would do! [smiles]

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  • 16

    Interview: Oct 27th, 1994

    Keith Casner

    On my turn, I asked him if he listened to music while he wrote.

    Robert Jordan

    He said yes, classical.

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