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Your search for the tag 'audiobooks' yielded 56 results

  • 1

    Interview: 1994

    Grey Culberson

    Have you heard the audio tape abridgments? What are your feelings toward them?

    Robert Jordan

    This brought a mighty harrumph from RJ. He then explained that he had not heard them but expressed his strong disapproval of the project. Apparently the publisher had acquired a portion of the rights to the series of which he was unaware, and those rights enabled them to go ahead with the project without informing or asking him. However, RJ is planning his own audio tape project which will record the books unabridged. When RJ was asked whether the voice man would be American or English, RJ expressed no opinion either way.

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  • 2

    Interview: May, 1995

    Robert Jordan

    The unabridged audio tape should be neat, nifty, and other outdated slang. It will be just what it says: every word of the books. I am talking with the audio publisher about having sections from a male point-of-view read by a man and those from a female point-of-view read by a woman. I think it will make it even better.

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  • 3

    Interview: Apr 5th, 1996

    Robert Jordan

    Halima is a man in a woman's body. I got Jordan to 'fess up to this one when he was talking about the new books-on-tape that will be coming out soon. He said that a male voice will read the parts that are from a man's point of view and a female voice will read the parts that are from a female character's point of view. "So, which one will read the passage from Halima's point of view?" I asked. Jordan sighed and said, "Halima's just weird." He went on to confirm that he/she is a male spirit inside a female body and suggested that he/she will change personality over time since the body affects the spirit (and vice-versa).

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  • 4

    Interview: Apr 5th, 1996

    Robert Jordan

    He says that unabridged books-on-tape production of The Eye of the World and A Crown of Swords are forthcoming. When, I dunno; I got the impression it was still a rather nebulous plan, but Tor (or whoever) has agreed to do them. The two mentioned above will be the first released, and the intermediary books will come out on tape in due course. The idea is to get a woman to read the parts which are in a woman's POV and a man to read the parts in a man's POV. Marina Sirtis of Star Trek fame, and Ben Kingsley were mentioned as possible readers.

    Footnote

    All of the Wheel of Time audiobooks are read by Kate Reading and Michael Kramer.

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  • 5

    Interview: Oct, 1998

    Sense of Wonder

    In a field where J.R.R. Tolkien has been used as a yardstick that leaves most authors far behind, the notoriously discriminating New York Times says you have come to dominate the world Tolkien began to reveal. As your Wheel of Time series has grown, the richness and compelling nature of your creation has also been favorably compared with that of other great masters in creative fields, including the Brothers Grimm, Aldous Huxley, Stephen King, Michael Moorcock, Frank Herbert, Robert Heinlein, and Beethoven! You are part of a distinguished heritage. What do you feel is most distinctive about your work?

    Robert Jordan

    Well, I believe I write with a distinctly American voice, and a distinctly Southern one to boot. There is a great story-telling tradition in the South. My grandfather, father, and uncles were all raconteurs, and I grew up listening to their stories, as well as those of other men. There's a touch of oral tradition in my writing. Maybe that's where Beethoven comes in. A spoken story must flow musically, in words and in structure. I believe that my fiction reads as if it were meant to be read aloud. It certainly goes well in the unabridged audiotape versions. In short, it is a matter of time and place and experience. I grew up in a different place and in a different way from any of those men, and lived a different life. I am none of those men, could not be, and don't want to be. I am myself.

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  • 6

    Interview: Jan 23rd, 2003

    Neill Smith

    I went through the line twice. My first question to him concerned the status of the unabridged audiobooks. I told him that I had tried to buy them from Books on Tape and had found out that they had lost the rights to them. He said that he hadn't known that, and that he would check in to the matter. I also mentioned that The Eye of The World had been listed by Amazon as being released by The Publishing Mills in October, but I never got my copy before they changed the listing to "out of print".

    Robert Jordan

    He said that the original company with the audiobooks rights had been sold to another company, and that "it was a big mess". He said Books on Tape had been sold, but I think that it is The Publishing Mills that has been sold to New Millenium Publishing. He reiterated that he would find out what was going on. I asked how I could find out what the status was after he found out, and he said he didn't know of any way to manage that. I then suggested maybe he could send a message to Dragonmount after he had checked into matters, and he said that yes he might send an answer to Jason (??). [Editor's note: Woo hoo! That's me!] So Jason (??, I hope I got the name right) maybe you could remind him to check into this, or maybe you can find out what is going on through your WoT-related contacts. He did say that the audiobook publisher of Crossroads of Twilight is a Tor company, so I guess The Publishing Mills only had rights to the first 8 or 9 books.

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  • 7

    Interview: Sep 28th, 2005

    Robert Jordan

    It seems to me that you've put up a lot of comments given the few days that has been possible. I think I'll address a few of them.

    I see that someone—anonymous—uses the audio book pronunciations for a guide.

    In the very beginning, the actors doing the reading got in touch with me about pronunciations, but they stopped halfway through reading The Eye of the World, and I haven't heard from them since. So I wouldn't go too much by what they use.

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  • 8

    Interview: Mar, 2006

    Steven Steinbock

    Decorated Vietnam War veteran Robert Jordan began putting quill to parchment in 1977, and hasn't stopped since. Storytelling is in Jordan's blood. The South Carolina native, who taught himself to read at age 4 and began reading Jules Verne and Mark Twain at age 5, has written novels set during the American Revolution, a dozen adventures featuring Robert E. Howard's Conan, and, most notably, 12 epic novels (11 primary novels and one prequel) in his Wheel of Time fantasy series.

    Robert Jordan

    "The spoken word is the basis for all storytelling," he told us from his 1797 home in the historic district of Charleston, South Carolina. "My father and my uncles were storytellers. When we went fishing or hunting, there was always storytelling at night. I grew up with that oral tradition. I've always thought that my writing lends itself to being read aloud for that very reason."

    Steven Steinbock

    We asked him about the advantages of listening to a book as opposed to reading it.

    Robert Jordan

    "When reading an actual book," he answered, "it's possible to skip over things. You make connections in your head, and you find you're not registering every word. But when it's read to you, there's a difference. You hear every word."

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  • 9

    Interview: Mar, 2006

    Steven Steinbock

    Ten of the Wheel of Time novels are available in unabridged format from Books on Tape and Audio Renaissance. All of these are co-read by Michael Kramer and Kate Reading.

    Robert Jordan

    "It was my suggestion in the first place," Jordan admitted, "that we have a male and a female actor to do this, a woman to read the female point of view and a man to read the male point of view. And we lucked out in that they both do voices as well. So it is as close as I can come to having an ensemble doing the reading."

    Steven Steinbock

    In addition, Jordan's Western novel, Cheyenne Raiders, available as a digital download from Books on Tape, is read by Michael Kramer.

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  • 10

    Interview: Mar, 2006

    Steven Steinbock

    Jordan believes that speaking and listening are integral to the art of storytelling.

    Robert Jordan

    "A novel that is written as if it were being told comes across clearer and makes a deeper connection to the reader than a novel that ignores the oral tradition."

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  • 11

    Interview: Sep 28th, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    Following up on Tor's release of the ebook of The Gathering Storm's prologue and their free preview of chapter one, this past Thursday Tor.com put up the audio version of the second chapter (registration required). As is standard for Egwene chapters in Wheel of Time audiobooks, it's performed by the talented Kate Reading. Give it a listen!

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  • 12

    Interview: Feb 22nd, 2010

    Brandon Sanderson

    The Gathering Storm was named as one of five nominees for the 2010 Audie awards in the category of science fiction/fantasy audiobook. Kudos to voice performers Michael Kramer and Kate Reading! If you haven't had a chance to give the Wheel of Time audiobooks a try, I highly recommend them.

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  • 13

    Interview: Mar 29th, 2010

    Brandon Sanderson

    I mentioned on Twitter and Facebook that The Gathering Storm needed votes in Audible's 2010 tournament. Last I heard, it was beating The Girl Who Played With Fire by four tenths of a percent. Voting ends today sometime—actually it may be over by the time you see this message, but go vote anyway (if you think it should win). If it gets to the next round, it will be up against the winner of Beat the Reaper vs. Always Looking Up.

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  • 14

    Interview: Mar 19th, 2010

    Luckers

    What did you do for Robert Jordan as a part of that job, and how much as that changed since his passing?

    Maria Simons

    My job has constantly evolved. First there was fanmail and filing. Then the audiobook project got underway, and someone had to go through and mark all of the changes in point of view so that Michael Kramer could read the male POVs and Kate Reading could read the female ones. Jim decided that I could do that, so, much to my delight, I was getting paid to read The Wheel of Time. I was in hog heaven, of course. At that time, Jim was finishing up A Crown of Swords, and when the proofs came in, Harriet suggested that I assist in going through them, but Jim said no, he didn't want to spoil me. I was crushed. Over the next year or so, though, my job broadened. He gave me the in-house glossary to tidy up, and some of his notes to consolidate. He also would give me lists of questions like "Has character A ever met Character B?" and "Give me three examples of character C's speech" and "Find me all of the information you can on what a baby feels as he's being born." By the time he had The Path of Daggers ready to give to Harriet for editing, I had convinced him that I could help with maintaining our house glossary going forward, and he decided that I would get the pages at the same time Harriet did. Harriet encouraged me to edit as well, and I would do that and pass the pages on to her. I don't know if any of my edits made it into the final book, but Harriet did begin recommending me for freelance editing.

    I did other things as well. Jim had a massive personal library, and mentioned that he would love for it to be cataloged; I cobbled together a classification system, using WordPerfect mail merge. I also cataloged his music collection, and kept the existing catalog of movies updated. I did shopping for him, arranged appointments, worked on the Wizards of the Coast RPG and the New Spring comics. When the new cat went missing, I made and put up posters in the neighborhood (we found her hiding under the house, eventually); when cranes and herons started stealing goldfish, I was given fox urine to spread around the pond to discourage them (Jim did encourage me to delegate; I managed to pass that one on to someone else. It smelled so bad that that idea was soon abandoned and we covered the fish pond with a net. I still sometimes find huge birds staring hungrily at the fish when I walk out there). Eventually I took over the bookkeeping as well. He took to calling me his right arm. Over time, I picked up assistants, two of whom are still with me: Marcia Warnock, who took over the book catalog, spread the fox urine, keeps me in office supplies, handles all the annoying phone calls, and keeps me on schedule; and Alan Romanczuk, who took over the questions and research, became our IT specialist, and assists with the bookkeeping, among many other things.

    Then, after the Knife of Dreams tour, Jim was diagnosed with amyloidosis. Our focus changed somewhat; we all worked to help him and Harriet as much as we could. After the night that Jim told the ending to Wilson and Harriet, I would sit and talk with him about the end of the series, with a tape recorder running. The last thing that we did together was select the winners of the calendar art contest. Note: I didn't select, I just gave him the art and took notes, and then emailed the winning names to Tor. That was two days before his death.

    The significant thing that has changed about my job since then is that Jim isn't here. It's quieter—there is no big, booming voice calling "Maria!" or singing as he comes in the office. There's no one explaining military stuff to me and making it really clear and interesting. There's no one sitting at his desk wearing a silly hat. What I do at my job hasn't changed that much. Now I work directly for Harriet, who is as wonderful a boss as Jim was. When Brandon has questions about the books, I work on finding answers, as does Alan. When Brandon sends us a book, I go through it looking for continuity errors, just as I did with Jim, and suggesting other changes, just as before. I still do the bookkeeping with Alan's help, and other banal stuff. I know a lot more fans now, of course; I went to JordanCon, DragonCon, and the Charleston and New York booksignings for The Gathering Storm. I can hardly wait until JordanCon 2, which as I type is 11 weeks and 1 day away.

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  • 15

    Interview: Apr 14th, 2010

    Brandon Sanderson

    Voting has begun for the David Gemmell Legend Award, which I mentioned last week. It will continue through May 31st. Both Warbreaker and The Gathering Storm are among the five nominees, but if you're struggling to pick one I'd recommend The Gathering Storm since I feel it's more in the spirit of Mr. Gemmell's work.

    There's a great article on Robert Jordan, Harriet, and finishing the Wheel of Time in the Charleston City Paper. I'm not sure about the print edition, but online it's listed as the cover story.

    The Gathering Storm has won Audible's 3rd Annual Tournament of Audiobooks, defeating The Help in the final round. Wow! Since this is a fan-voted award, I'm honored that you decided to give it the nod. I'm sure Mr. Jordan is also pleased. Performers Michael Kramer and Kate Reading have many fans as well; if you haven't had a chance to check out the Wheel of Time series on audiobook, give it a try.

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  • 16

    Interview: Nov 6th, 2010

    Brandon Sanderson

    Someone asked about why audiobooks are so expensive, and Brandon made it clear that it was an issue of production costs...which makes sense. Harriet is not a fan of eBooks, which is why it's taken so long for the books to be converted over to that format.

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  • 17

    Interview: Feb 28th, 2011

    JamesKY ()

    First off, I really enjoyed The Way of Kings. I became more emotionally attached to the characters in this book than I did in Mistborn or Elantris. Dalinar and Kaladin are some of my favorite literary characters of all time.

    My question is in regards to the audio book version of The Way of Kings. I think Michael Kramer and Kate Reading did a great job narrating the book and creating voices for each of the characters but I wanted to know what you thought about it. Do you feel like the characters were portrayed accurately based on your original ideas for them?

    I'm also reading WoT for the first time. I just finished A Crown of Swords and I'm looking forward to seeing what happens and how you complete the series. I just hope it doesn't delay the sequel to The Way of Kings too much. ;)

    Brandon Sanderson

    I asked for Michael and Kate specifically, since I've liked their work on the Wheel of Time. That said, it's always an odd experience to hear the book read by someone else. In fact, I find it an odder experience than getting cover art, which is arguably a larger 'interpretation' of my work than a reading is. I think with the reading, I find myself wanting to tweak and change things, so it's kind of a nerve-wracking experience.

    I think Michael and Kate did a great job, though sometimes, it's a strange experience to hear voices I associate with WoT characters being used for someone else.

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  • 18

    Interview: Mar 28th, 2011

    Brandon Sanderson

    Audible.com is once again putting on its Tournament of Audiobooks, and Towers of Midnight is one of the competitors. The first round is underway, and so far Towers is narrowly beating out American Assassin. If you want to vote, click on the Best Sellers tab. (The Gathering Storm won last year's tournament.)

    Suvudu has Vin up against Jon Snow in the semifinals of this year's cage match. Since Jon Snow hails from George R. R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire, he's probably going to win. Which I'm perfectly fine with, as George is a true master of a writer. Besides, I really have no interest in seeing both Vin and Perrin winning their semifinal matches (Perrin will be pitted against Quick Ben from Steven Erikson's Malazan Book of the Fallen, who is no pushover) and facing each other in the final.

    Ta'veren Tees is having a contest where customers can win free Wheel of Time shirts. See their contest rules here.

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  • 19

    Interview: Apr 13th, 2011

    Brandon Sanderson

    There are also a couple of other updates. Towers of Midnight has made it to the semifinals of Audible's Tournament of Audiobooks, but it is currently behind in votes to Matterhorn by Karl Marlantes. If you liked the Towers of Midnight audiobook, consider giving it your vote. (Of course you can vote for Matterhorn instead, if you think that was a better audiobook.)

    The Stormlight Archive character name auction is still going on. The local newspaper did an article on it.

    I haven't linked this week's Writing Excuses podcast episode yet. Recent episodes were recorded at LTUE when I was at ConDFW, so I haven't been appearing, but this episode marks my return. Dan Wells, Howard Tayler, and I talk about urban fantasy.

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  • 20

    Interview: Dec 6th, 2010

    Brandon Sanderson

    Both The Way of Kings and Towers of Midnight are nominated for best fantasy book of 2010 at Goodreads. You have to be signed up with Goodreads to vote. Also, it looks like Audible listeners already voted on their favorite audiobooks of the year, and both books made the top 10 (that's out of all audiobooks, not just fantasy). The Way of Kings was also selected as a top 5 Audible.com editor's pick for sci-fi & fantasy.

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  • 21

    Interview: Aug 4th, 2011

    Question

    How much influence do you have over audiobooks? I know some authors that get really good audio...

    Brandon Sanderson

    You can replace that question with: how much influence do you have over X? You can replace the X with anything and the answer's going to be the same: how many books do you sell? Nowadays, I have a lot of influence over what happens with stuff. I can ask for things. Early on, I had very little influence over these things.

    Question

    Did Michael...

    Brandon Sanderson

    I asked specifically for Michael Kramer and Kate Reading, yes. I like their style, and I know, I've met Michael and I really like him. So, yeah.

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  • 22

    Interview: 1997

    Laura Wilson

    Are you an audiobooks listener? And if so, what sorts of books do you listen to?

    Robert Jordan

    I'm afraid the audiobooks I listen to are my own. I don't read my own books, but when I get the new audio tape, I listen to it because I get a different view. It is different than reading it.

    Laura Wilson

    So are you listening for a different interpretation of your work?

    Robert Jordan

    It's not so much the different interpretation. I want to have that one-removed to see that I actually said what I think I said. You see, that's a problem that is very difficult for any writer. It's a problem that your editor helps you solve. You know what you intended to say. You know what you meant. And the fact that you perhaps didn't put it down clearly enough for someone who doesn't know what you meant to understand, that can be a problem. My wife Harriet is my editor, and she's very very good at being able to say, "You didn't convince me here." Or, "I don't understand what you mean here. You have to do better." Because that's the point where I know what I meant, and because I know what I meant, it read fine to me. But to someone who didn't know what I meant, it didn't read fine. Well, I can also spot some of that in listening to the audio. And because I can spot it in listening to the audio, I know that, ahh, I thought I had put a bit of foreshadowing for something of the future here, and it doesn't come across clearly, I must do something about that in the next book to make sure that I do have that foreshadowing.

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  • 23

    Interview: 2001

    Rochelle O'Gorman

    Winter's Heart came out unabridged, which is the first time your books have been unabridged for the retail market. Did you have any influence in that?

    Robert Jordan

    Yes I did. I very much wanted it to come out unabridged, because I have a first cousin once removed who is dyslexic and she could not manage to read the books very well, and she wanted to. So, I agitated to get an unabridged edition done from the very beginning. And I also pressed for there to be a man to read the male point of view sections and a woman to read the female point of view sections. At first I was told it was not necessary and that it was not done. And I said, "We'd like it done." Various people finally agreed with me.

    Rochelle O'Gorman

    You must have heard the abridged versions.

    Robert Jordan

    Please don't get me off on that.

    Rochelle O'Gorman

    Oh, go ahead. This is my big bugaboo too.

    Robert Jordan

    I don't like abridged versions, and particularly with something as long as my own books. In the abridged versions as much as 90 percent of the book has to be cut out, so I don't like them. As a matter of fact, I made sure that no one could do an abridged version of this latest book. I still own those particular rights, specifically defined, and I do not intend to let anybody do it.

    I do not believe in abridgments. I think abridgments tell people that they are getting a dumbed down version of something. What people think they're getting is an easier or faster version, but what they are actually getting is the version for dummies.

    Rochelle O'Gorman

    Do you listen to many audiobooks?

    Robert Jordan

    Not to a great extent, sometimes in the evening. But most of the time I read the actual hardbacks. I read books before they ever hit the audio stage and I listen to music most of the time.

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  • 24

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Graendal

    Do you know when the audio version of Warbreaker will be released?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Like Elantris, there will be two audio version of Warbreaker. Performed and straight read. Both are in production. Dramatic is coming October http://tinyurl.com/nsrr3l. Looks like unabridged is October too. http://bit.ly/15rJFF

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  • 25

    Interview: Nov 21st, 1998

    Robert Jordan

    He also said that the tape versions of the books mangled a lot of the pronunciation.

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  • 26

    Interview: Nov 21st, 1998

    Question (22 November 1998)

    A lot of people asked pronunciation questions.

    Robert Jordan

    He remarked that no one ever seemed to read the glossaries. He also remarked that one of the taped versions (I omitted this earlier because I didn't catch the publishers) was just awful about this—they stopped calling for clarifications about halfway through the first book. He thought this meant they had enough to extrapolate correctly for the rest of them. They did not.

    He ended by commenting that everyone was going to come up with their own internal pronunciations anyway.

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  • 27

    Interview: 2012

    Shaun Duquette (12 January 2012)

    Are you almost done whatever it is you're doing with A Memory of Light? Because drawing out the last book is getting crazy.

    Brandon Sanderson (12 January 2012)

    I'm trying to get it revised as quickly as I can. This book is going to need a lot of care to make sure I don't miss anything.

    EIREMAUVE (13 JANUARY)

    Who has the most POVs? Is it a tie between a couple people?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Boy, I haven't counted. Rand/Perrin/Egwene/Mat are all probably about neck and neck.

    L-Etrengere

    [Now-protected tweet that said something about Egwene getting so many POVs.]

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Well, she IS one of the main characters of the series. It would be kind of odd to leave her out of the Last Battle...

    WILL HAGEN

    Will there be an audiobook release along side the text (with Micheal perhaps)?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Yes, there should be.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Okay, I'm off until later tonight. Progress on the revision is going well; I expect to be done by mid-February, maybe by the end of January.

    NICK

    Is there an official release date for the final book yet? Last I heard was March.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    There isn't yet, though it will be fall. Harriet asked for more time to edit, and I needed time to do more research.

    JARED OLSEN

    You probably hear this often, but you have done an outstanding job on WOT books. Thank you for honoring Jordan and saving fans. #mistborn

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    It has been an honor.

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  • 28

    Interview: Mar 20th, 2012

    Brandon Sanderson

    In the most recent Writing Excuses podcast episode, Howard, Mary, and I talk about writing the omniscient viewpoint. (Dan wasn't there; he was off saving his son from ninjas or something like that.)

    The newest Alcatraz Versus the Evil Librarians annotation discusses my use of prison names, the setting, and Bastille. And I'm very pleased to announce that the audiobook for Alcatraz Versus the Scrivener's Bones is finally available. The other two audiobooks will follow within a few months. Rutabaga.

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  • 29

    Interview: Mar, 2012

    Samuel Montgomery-Blinn

    Wayne's ability to mimic and create accents is used to great effect in the book, and Michael Kramer really shines in bringing these accents to life in the audiobook. Did you have a sense when writing the book that these could be challenging—and rewarding—scenes when read?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I certainly did. The thing is, I'm not good with talking in accents myself—I can hear them in my head, but I'm atrocious at trying to do them. So while I was writing the book, I was thinking in the back of my mind, "I really hope that poor Michael can pull this off." It was a lot of fun to write Wayne's accents. I'm writing in a world that isn't our world, but the Mistborn world is a bit of an Earth analogue. I intentionally used themes that make it an Earth parallel, which is different from my other worlds. So you can have a character who kind of has a light Cockney accent or something like that, but it's not our world so it can't exactly mimic that accent. So it's already a challenge in that respect. I do think Michael did a fantastic job.

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  • 30

    Interview: Mar, 2012

    Samuel Montgomery-Blinn

    What are your favorite audiobooks? (Or: do you listen to audiobooks?)

    Brandon Sanderson

    I listen to audiobooks on occasion, when I'm driving somewhere. The thing is, I don't drive much anymore, because I work from home. I do enjoy audiobooks, but I like to listen to them when I'm doing something else. I really enjoyed the Harry Potter audiobooks—I thought those were very good. I like Michael Kramer and Kate Reading's interpretation of the Wheel of Time. But I am not as much an audiobook junkie as some people would be, because I don't go anywhere. Most people I've known who listen to a lot of audiobooks like to do it while they're commuting or something like that.

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  • 31

    Interview: Mar, 2012

    Samuel Montgomery-Blinn

    Something which just occurred to me was that, other than editors, advance reviewers, etc. the first people who will get their hands on the conclusion to The Wheel of Time will be the audiobook narrators—including Kramer, who has been a constant voice in the series. You've written that the final words in the series are Robert Jordan's—can you give away whether the final voice on the audiobook might be Kramer's?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Ha! I can't give you something like that. I'm sorry. Nice try, though.

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  • 32

    Interview: Mar, 2012

    Samuel Montgomery-Blinn

    Michael Kramer is, other than Elantris (Jack Garrett), Warbreaker (James Yaegashi), and the Alcatraz series (Ramon de Ocampo), "the voice of Brandon Sanderson" when it comes to audiobooks, handling narration on The Wheel of Time, the Mistborn trilogy, The Way of Kings, and now The Alloy of Law. What makes him such a well-suited narrator for your books?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I feel there's a fine line to walk between performing too much and not enough. When I like to listen to an audiobook, I don't want to hear just a dry read. I like a subtle shift in character voice and tone when someone is speaking, so that you can get a sense of it. But I don't like it performed so much—particularly for my own works—that it takes you out of the story. Having listened to the Wheel of Time audiobooks, as that is one of the main series I've listened to in my life, I really wanted Michael Kramer for some of my works. So I asked for him by name.

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  • 33

    Interview: Jun 28th, 2012

    Brandon Sanderson

    Readers have been asking if my forthcoming novellas Legion and The Emperor's Soul will be released in audio versions. The answer is that they will be—we have deals made for these, but I'm not sure how quickly the audiobooks will be released compared to the book versions. I'll let you know when I have more details.

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  • 34

    Interview: Jun 28th, 2012

    Brandon Sanderson

    Another question commonly asked is whether Michael Kramer and Kate Reading will return to voice the audiobook for A Memory of Light. The answer is yes, and the audiobook will definitely be released the same day as the hardcover.

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  • 35

    Interview: Jun 28th, 2012

    Brandon Sanderson

    All of my books are now out in audio editions, including the last three Alcatraz books that were missing audiobooks for a few years. There are two different kinds of audiobooks of mine that have come out: standard unabridged readings (from Macmillan Audio and Recorded Books) and full-cast dramatizations (from GraphicAudio). Which type each book has depends on how contracts were negotiated.

    Recorded Books has unabridged readings of Elantris, Warbreaker, and all four Alcatraz books.

    GraphicAudio has full-cast dramatizations of Elantris and Warbreaker.

    Macmillan Audio has unabridged readings of Mistborn 1, 2, 3 and The Alloy of Law; The Way of Kings; and The Gathering Storm and Towers of Midnight.

    Amazon has most of the above for sale. Audible has everything except for the GraphicAudio editions. iTunes also has many of the books.

    Tor.com has a free unabridged reading of the novelette "Firstborn."

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  • 36

    Interview: Oct 23rd, 2012

    Brandon Sanderson

    Macmillan Audio is running a little promotion for the A Memory of Light audiobook on CD (sorry, US residents only). This image pretty much says it all:

    Looks cool! For more details, see this link.

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  • 37

    Interview: Jan 9th, 2013

    Question

    How do Michael and Kate Reading keep track of all the voices doing the audiobooks?

    Brandon Sanderson

    (to Harriet and Maria) Do either of you know? (demur) No idea. [laughter] Sorry; easy answer, but we have no idea. You'll have to ask them.

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  • 38

    Interview: Feb 6th, 2013

    Question

    Are there any discussions in place to convert these books to audio books?

    Brandon Sanderson

    They are already all on audio book.

    Freelancer

    The man was actually standing very close to the rack full of audio volumes.

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  • 39

    Interview: Feb 11th, 2013

    Question

    So a lot of my consumption of all of the books by both Robert Jordan and yourself have been audiobooks. And so just curious from an art direction standpoint—since now the book is no longer the medium through which I'm encountering the story, it's through someone else's interpretation—how much art direction would you have in saying, hey this is how this character is or this is how . . . ?

    Harriet McDougal

    Well, they read word for word. They're not edited. And really, as far as I know, there's no direction. They did ask for — at the beginning, with The Eye of the World, they wanted advice on pronunciations. (laughter)

    And they got it, and they understood some of the instructions and missed a couple. (laughter) And I will tell you that the readers are a husband and wife of professional actors, both of them. But the woman's response—when she saw The Eye of the World, she said, "Why do you bother with a woman reader?" And the answer was: wait for the next book. (laughter)

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  • 40

    Interview: Apr 15th, 2013

    Reddit AMA 2013 (Verbatim)

    Rotten_tacos ()

    Hey Brandon! I've always wondered this, what is the best way to support you as an author? Do you make more money if we buy an ebook, off of amazon, or at Barnes & Nobles? As a fan of yours I want to make sure you're receiving as much of the money as I can give.

    Brandon Sanderson

    I get this question on occasion, and always feel the best thing for me to do is emphasize that I prefer you to buy the format that makes you the most happy. That way, you are encouraged to keep reading, and that is really what is best for me.

    Most authors makes something around the following:

    Hardcover, 15% of cover. (Regardless of store, unless it's a bargain book.)

    Paperback, 8% of cover. (Regardless of venue.)

    Ebook, 17.5% of the list price. (Unless they are self-published, and then it's usually 65-70% of list price.)

    So, the best way to get money to an author is to buy the hardcover, preferably during launch week. (That influences how high the book gets on bestseller lists and how much in-store support it gets.)

    However, I don't think that is something a reader needs to worry too much about. To be honest, rather than thinking about this, I think most authors would say that the best thing you can do for us is just read the books. Second best is to loan your copies to a friend so they can enjoy the books too.

    firsthour

    With these percentages, were you then sharing/splitting it with the Robert Jordan estate for the Wheel of Time books?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes.

    deadlycrate

    Can I just send you money?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I suppose you could—but I'd rather you buy a copy of one of my books and give it to someone. If I have you send me money, then we work around all of the people who deserve their share for helping me out. (Like my agent and editor.)

    stave

    Risky question time! How do you feel about those of us that buy your hardcover, then go and pirate the ebook?
    * This comment is not an admission of guilt.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Risky answer time. I've got no problem with it. I wish I could actively give away the ebook to everyone who bought the hardcover. I can actually do this on books like Legion and The Emperor's Soul, where I retain rights to the ebook. (So I do.)

    I'm not encouraging this, mind you. But I'm also not going to complain or make anyone feel guilty. If you've paid for the content once, I feel you should have access to it into the future, whenever you want, in any format you want. (With the exception being audiobook, where the voice actors deserve to be paid for their work above and beyond me getting paid for the writing.)

    oditogre

    What about with audiobooks? I subscribe to Audible and I can't help notice the price I pay for my subscription makes the books I get a steal compared to buying them without subscription or buying actual discs. How does that work out for the authors?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Audible has done wonderful things for the audiobook market, helping the format gain a lot of popularity. But their prices ARE rock bottom. I don't know off-hand how much we make. I don't mind, however, because audiobooks in the past were so horribly expensive.

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  • 41

    Interview: Apr 15th, 2013

    Reddit AMA 2013 (Verbatim)

    rome_demands ()

    I just started listening to The Way of Kings on audiobook with my wife! Did you get any input on how the production/casting/pronunciation went on it? Or is that entirely out of your hands?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I am of a level in the field now that I can ask for certain readers, and I did so with The Way of Kings. I do try to send in pronunciations, but sometimes this gets lost in the shuffle.

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  • 42

    Interview: Apr 15th, 2013

    Reddit AMA 2013 (Verbatim)

    stormcrowjg ()

    Who are your favorite audio book readers (is that the correct phrase...I think voice actors sounds better) to work with, or have read your work for the audio books?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I am a big fan of Michael Kramer and Kate Reading. The work Kramer does with character voices...man, it gives me shivers sometimes.

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  • 43

    Interview: Mar 21st, 2014

    Question

    You talked about how when you're reading it's an active process and you're almost like the narrator of the story, you're inventing details that aren't necessarily in the book. How much of that process do you think gets lost in the audiobook process?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I think you lose a little bit, but you gain a little bit in return, their interpretation, and things like that. It does happen, you lose a little bit, but you get something else in return.

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  • 44

    Interview: Mar 21st, 2014

    Question

    Have you listened to your books?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I have. I do really like Michael Kramer and Kate Reading, so I listen just to see what their interpretation is. I love that Herdazians are Australian.

    Question

    Are they on for the rest of the series?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes. Well, they said that they will as long as they're free.

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  • 45

    Interview: Mar 21st, 2014

    Question

    Do you know if Graphic Audio is ever going to tackle the Stormlight Archive?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I would like them to, but it's really up to Tor Audio, or actually MacMillian Audio. They are the ones, because we sold the audio rights to them, that would decide when they're going to do subsidiary licenses. Which they only recently decided on Mistborn. So I'm sure Graphic Audio would like to do it, probably after a few books of this are out they'll start doing it.

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  • 46

    Interview: Feb 20th, 2015

    Question

    Do you ever listen to your own audiobooks?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I do on occasion. I don’t listen to them for long because I will find myself wanting to change things. And that’s dangerous…

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  • 47

    Interview: Feb 20th, 2015

    Question

    Do you have a favorite narrator that you--Of your books and of other books.

    Brandon Sanderson

    It is Michael Kramer, who did the Wheel of Time books. Which is why I asked for him on my books.

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  • 48

    Interview: Feb 20th, 2015

    Argent

    If I may, how do you feel about Graphic Audio?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I, personally, love that they are available but I find them kind of distracting when I’m listening to them. Yeah. I’m glad-- I mean I want to sell as many of them as we can because there are some people who just love them. But I actually love straight reads, like I like Wil Wheaton’s reading, where there’s very minimal voices.

    Argent

    Well that’s because it’s Wil Wheaton.

    Brandon Sanderson

    It is Wil Wheaton but I-- I do like Graphic Audio because they use women for women’s parts, men for men’s parts, which is really helpful. Men doing women’s voices in books, and Women doing men’s voices as readers, a lot of them are like fingernails on a chalkboard for me.

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  • 49

    Interview: Oct 9th, 2015

    Question

    Is it weird having Michael Kramer doing your books as well as the Wheel of Time books?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes, so weird. The weirdest thing is that he did a signing with me, and then he did the reading, and then all of the voices of these voices come out of his mouth and I’m like – you're all of them!

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  • 50

    Interview: Feb 25th, 2016

    Question

    When you're writing, do you hear Michael Kramer in your head?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I do now. I asked for him by name because I liked how he and Kate Reading did the Wheel of Time books. Yeah, I get a big kick out of doing Wayne's voices and trying to figure out how Michael's going to try to read those.

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  • 51

    Interview: Feb 25th, 2016

    Question

    How involved are you in that [audiobook] process?

    Brandon Sanderson

    So, I pick the reader, and then I read all the names in the book and send them an audio file of that, and they listen to it and they sometimes follow what I say.

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  • 52

    Interview: Feb 24th, 2016

    Question

    The person in front of me asked if Brandon invents ridiculous accents for Wayne just to see if Michael Kramer can do different voices.

    Brandon Sanderson

    No, it's not just to torture Michael, though Brandon really enjoys hearing how Michael reads the different voices and he's amazed at the various accents, and he listens to all of the audiobooks at least once... However, Brandon will say he has one voice planned for Wayne that does make him giggle when he thinks of Michael Kramer having to do it. He's going to LAFO (Listen and Find Out) which voice it is, but we'll all likely be rolling around in tears when it happens.

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  • 53

    Interview: Feb 20th, 2016

    Question

    Graphic Audio?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Hoping for Stormlight next.

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  • 54

    Interview: Oct 14th, 2015

    Question

    I've been listening to the audiobooks of Stormlight. There are some really great character voices. Have you told him how to do the characters?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I have not told him how to do characters. I leave that to him. I give him pronunciations.

    Question

    So the Australian Lopen is all him.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yeah, the Australian is all him. Which is weird, because they're, they're based off of Hispanic cultures, so, hearing the Australian - but at the same time, they're not Hispanic, because there are no Hispanics on Roshar, so an Australian's probably just as accurate as anything else. But yes, I intended the Herdazians to have a Hispanic flair to them.

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