art by Jake Johnson

Theoryland Resources

WoT Interview Search

Search the most comprehensive database of interviews and book signings from Robert Jordan, Brandon Sanderson and the rest of Team Jordan.

Wheel of Time News

An Hour With Harriet

2012-04-30: I had the great pleasure of speaking with Harriet McDougal Rigney about her life. She's an amazing talent and person and it will take you less than an hour to agree.

The Bell Tolls

2012-04-24: Some thoughts I had during JordanCon4 and the upcoming conclusion of "The Wheel of Time."

Theoryland Community

Members: 7653

Logged In (1): mjarzombejohn,

Newest Members:johnroserking, petermorris, johnadanbvv, AndrewHB, jofwu, Salemcat1, Dhakatimesnews, amazingz, Sasooner, Hasib123,

Theoryland Tweets

WoT Interview Search

Home | Interview Database

Your search for the tag 'mistborn' yielded 820 results

  • 1

    Interview: 2011

    Twitter 2011 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Brandon Sanderson (11 January 2011)

    I'm now onto the last part of The Eye of the World. I've mentioned before that I, personally, find this the roughest part of the entire series.

    FELIX PAX

    Worse than books between Lord of Chaos and Winter's Heart? Really?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Yes, honestly. I've mentioned before I don't have the problem with those that others do.

    DOVI JOEL

    Do you mean roughest as in not well written? I love that part, I find it so epic (especially when the Creator talks to him). [Note: this is Dovi Joel's assumption.]

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    None of it is poorly written. In fact, some of the scenes—such as the Ways—are wonderful.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    It's just that it seems like we have a different book, with different goals, starting on us here.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    The climax for The Eye of the World doesn't completely click for me. I like the Ways, I like the Blight, but the entire package feels too sudden.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    We spend the entire book with Tar Valon as our goal and Ba'alzamon as villain. Now, the Eye is the goal and two Forsaken are villains.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Personally, I think this is due to RJ planning books 1-3 as one novel, then discovering it was too much and creating a break-point.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    To be fair, I feel I had some of the same problems at the end of Mistborn. Powers manifest that I could have foreshadowed better.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    One of the great challenges as a writer, particularly in fantasy, is to learn that balance of foreshadowing vs. pacing.

    BONZI

    And I would think, foreshadowing effectively vs. giving away too much.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Yes, exactly.

    BRANDON SANDERSON (11 JANUARY)

    For those curious, I'm reasonably sure books 1-3 were one novel at first. Tom Doherty, CEO of Tor, told me in detail of RJ's WoT pitch.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    He pitched a trilogy, but the first book ended with Rand taking the sword (that wasn't a sword) from the Stone (that wasn't a stone.)

    MICHAEL REYNOLDS

    The sword in the stone!!! How on Earth did I miss that? :shame:

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Lol. I missed it the first time too. And things like Caemlyn, Egwene, Gawyn, Galad, Merrilin. I at least got Artur Hawkwing...

    MICHAEL REYNOLDS

    Ever feel like RJ removed any possibility of borrowing from any mythology ever again? He seemingly hit 'em all buffet-style.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Actually, I've felt that very thing.

    JAMES POWELL

    I'd heard that one reason that WOT is so long is that Tor asked RJ for "more books", and he thought they meant "more WOT".

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    That's not actually true, from what I know. Tor never pushed RJ for more books. He was allowed to what he wanted, as he wanted.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    People are noting George R.R. Martin expanded A Song of Ice and Fire also. RJ and GRRM are similar types of writers: http://bit.ly/e59ox0 Search for 'gardener.'

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I'm am more of an architect than a gardener. I do more 'gardening' on character, but I plan world and plot very extensively.

    FELIX PAX

    Did RJ have a cluster of concepts, themes or concepts written down in his notes? Mindmaps? To create his story's "garden"?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Yes, many.

    FELIX PAX (17 JANUARY)

    What do you think of the literary method of foreshadowing by saying something is impossible to do or will not occur?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I think it can work very well. RJ certainly did it quite a bit. You need to be somewhat subtle with it, though.

    Tags

  • 2

    Interview: 2011

    Twitter 2011 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Brandon Sanderson (18 January 2011)

    Unless I'm missing one, our first Egwene viewpoint in the series is the way into The Great Hunt. She is our fifth viewpoint character.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Point to @RajivMote: I DID miss an Egwene viewpoint. In "Ravens," the new first chapter of The Eye of the World in the Young Adult repackage of the WoT books.

    ERIN KELLY

    Sixth, if you count Bors and the five seconds of Moraine at the end of The Great Hunt.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I already counted Moraine. Not Bors, though. I'm talking Viewpoint characters, which means characters who commonly have VPs.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Fortune prick me, a Domon viewpoint. Don't know if I'll count him as the sixth VP character, though. We don't return to him frequently.

    HADNAN KADERE

    But you counted Moiraine who only shows up once in The Eye of the World, once in The Shadow Rising, and twice in The Fires of Heaven.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    She's got a ton of VP time here at the beginning of The Great Hunt.

    HADNAN KADERE

    She has exactly five VPs in The Great Hunt. She has exactly nine in the whole series (not counting New Spring). That's only three more than Fain.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I've been asked who was behind the plot to see Domon dead in The Great Hunt. It was Hamlet, obviously.

    BRANDON SANDERSON (19 JANUARY)

    I'll count Fain as our sixth viewpoint character (or, maybe he's fifth and Egwene is sixth.) I love the scene where they find the dead Fade.

    TEREZ

    Your Inquisitors in Mistborn always made me think of that Fade. Sorry if I've said that before; I can't remember, lol.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Yes I think there's got to be some kind of unconscious thing going on there on my part. (Re: Fades and Inquisitors.)

    Footnote

    Bors/Carridin had four POVs, while Thom only had four before A Memory of Light, and Domon also had four, but all four were in The Great Hunt.

    Tags

  • 3

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Czanos

    Would anything interesting happen if an Allomancer Burned a Hemalurgic spike, or a Feruchemist Tapped one?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Er, well, it’s possible. But you’d have to be burning a Hemalurgic spike that killed you and took your power... Just like you can’t gain anything by burning a metalmind unless you infused it yourself.

    Tags

  • 4

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Meeeeech

    Who would win this three way fight? Vin vs. Vasher vs. Lan? I vote Vin...

    Brandon Sanderson

    Depends on how much metal Vin has, how many Breaths Vasher has, and if Lan can get the jump on them. Probably Vin, though Rand would blow her out of the water.

    MEEEEECH

    P.S. Vin would lure Rand to Far Madding and take him down.

    Tags

  • 5

    Interview: Jan 16th, 2008

    Brandon Sanderson

    New Annotations!

    WELL OF ASCENSION: Chapter Twenty
    WELL OF ASCENSION: Chapter Twenty-One

    So, I'm not sure I GET social networking websites. I have a Myspace, and I started updating it and keeping my blog, but eventually the number of spam add requests I got—mixed with how frustrating it was to log in all the time and deal with all of those in-your-face-ads—was too annoying for me. The page has languished without being touched in months and months.

    LiveJournal I get, and I rather like. It's a place for people to host blogs, and all of their friend tools make it really easy to read what is happening in people's lives. I think they have a great product, and they make it very easy to post remotely—which I do.

    Facebook . . . I don't know what to make of Facebook. I like that I'm not blasted with advertisements, and the friend requests have all been legitimate. They allow me to remotely post my blog there by giving me tools that mirror my LJ. All in all, it seems a good product. The problem, then, is that I'm not sure I GET Facebook. (Like I said above.)

    Do people go there to read blogs? Does anyone actually see my blog posts there? They come as imported notes. Facebook fans, help me out. How can I make certain that when a blog post of mine is imported, a message appears on the home page of those who have friended me. Also, how can I indicate on my profile that the main way I update my Facebook is through those imported notes? I've had a lot of friend request lately, and I'd like people to know what's up with stuff.

    Tags

  • 6

    Interview: Feb 2nd, 2008

    Brandon Sanderson

    Note: Since I forgot to announce it last week, I'm going to give an extra week on the Mistborn hardcover sale. On Friday the 8th, we're going to move the price up to $25. Thanks to everyone who has ordered copies so far! You've made this a success, and so I'll probably do it with future books.

    Tags

  • 7

    Interview: Mar 15th, 2008

    Brandon Sanderson

    (For you trivia buffs, the longest book I've ever written was 306k long. It was The Way of Kings, which was the book I wrote right before Mistborn. The first draft of Well of Ascension was second, topping out at 258k in first draft form, though we cut it to about 245k before it went to press. So yes, A Memory of Light is going to be the longest book I've ever worked on. Though, since Mr. Jordan left large chunks of writing for the book—including much of the beginning and ending—I don't know that this will technically be the longest book I've written, assuming you count only words I myself wrote.)

    Tags

  • 8

    Interview: Apr 13th, 2008

    Brandon Sanderson

    First, I'll be teaching at BYU's Writers for Young Readers conference this summer. They suggested I post a link, and I thought it would be a good idea. I think my session is filled up, but there might be other authors you can work with. Conferences like this one are expensive, but can really give you a leg up if you're wanting to break into publishing.

    Secondly, Amazon has put up the cover art for Mistborn 3, which is nifty. It's still odd that the promotional Mistborn 1 and Mistborn 2 paperbacks still have no cover art posted, but whatever.

    Finally, here is an amusing Librarian reaction to Alcatraz. If you haven't read the book, then you might want to know that this is tongue in cheek. All part of the joke. Which reminds me, I really need to get around to posting some of the Alcatraz concept art I commissioned from the talented Shawn Boyles. I keep intending to use these things on EvilLibrarians.com, which I own, but I never can find the time. Here's one he did of Alcatraz. alcatraz_color

    Footnote

    The Alcatraz image is no longer available.

    Tags

  • 9

    Interview: Sep 14th, 2008

    Brandon Sanderson

    And, since this is an email-related blog post, let me actually do a reader mail.

    Steve from Sacramento writes,

    Hi Brandon,
    Besides being an avid reader (and fan of your writing), I'm also a computer gamer . . . I think your Mistborn world would make an excellent setting for a game. I'd love to play a game with allomantic and feruchemical powers. Is this something you've considered pursuing?

    Thanks for the question, Steve! I'm a gamer myself—a big fan of RPGs and FPSs. (And I've put off playing Halo Three, which I really want to play, until I get A Memory of Light written. It's been kind of hard.)

    I HAVE considered doing a Mistborn game. In fact, I was in talks with a company at one point to licence the game to them. I even wrote up a proposal for the game. (I imagined it being a nice hybrid between an RPG and a platformer, perhaps something along the lines of the metroid/castlevania vein with a physics engine. Or, for something more big budget, I'd love to see a Morrowind style Mistborn RPG.)

    That deal fell through, however, and I don't blame the company for going another direction. Still, I'm openly pursing this option. If any of you out there work for a video game company and might be interested in a Mistborn game, feel free to fire me off an email! I'll respond faster than six weeks on something like that. ;)

    And while it's something kind of different, we've still got the Mistborn Pen and Paper RPG coming out, which has me VERY excited. If I had to chose between a video game and a pen and paper like this, I'd go with the pen and paper first. I think it offers a more complete and immersive experience, and the chance to work with Crafty has me psyched.

    Tags

  • 10

    Interview: Sep 23rd, 2008

    Brandon Sanderson

    First off, I've posted a new Well of Ascension annotation: Chapter Forty-Four

    Secondly, there's another website that is sponsoring a giveaway of my books, this one by the FantasyBookCritic blog. They're giving away an entire Mistborn trilogy set.

    Thirdly, we've sold about 75 of the 100 copies of Mistborn Two I have up for sale. These probably won't last another week, so hurry up if you want one.

    Fourthly, I received a nice email from some folks who have started up a Mistborn Fansite—the first one I know of. It's call Mistborn Empire. Thanks, guys! You flatter me.

    Tags

  • 11

    Interview: Sep 9th, 2008

    Brandon Sanderson

    First off, here are two new Mistborn: The Well of Ascension Annotations

    Chapter Forty-Two
    Chapter Forty-Three

    These are two of the most dynamic chapters in the book, so I'm glad to finally have annotations for them. Sorry to take so long.

    Tags

  • 12

    Interview: Sep 9th, 2008

    Brandon Sanderson

    What else is there to talk about . . . oh, the Poster Contest. My business manager (aka my lovely wife) should soon be sending out confirmation emails to those who have entered. I'll continue on more slowly through my inbox to give you personal responses, in case you included other questions or comments. And if you haven't entered the contest yet, you've still got plenty of time. I have to say, these Mistborn Two posters look quite stunning. A lot of people think that it has the best cover in the hardcover trilogy.

    Now, don't forget the release party for Mistborn Three on the 14th of October! I will be posting more news on that soon, including an explanation on how those of you who live out of state can get a signed/numbered copy mailed to you.

    Tags

  • 13

    Interview: Oct 25th, 2008

    Brandon Sanderson

    Mistborn Two: New Annotation Chapter Forty Eight

    Warbreaker: Copyedit is done and turned in. I actually got this done earlier in the week, but was bouncing around too much doing other things to get the percentage bar updated.

    Mistborn Three: Finding the book is still spotty, since the bestseller list spiked another round of sales. Right now, my agent says that Borders stores are slightly more likely to have copies than B&N. However, the best place to find copies are places that I've visited recently on my tour. I think Sam Weller's may even have a few numbered copies left, though those may be gone by now. (Call them first, I'd suggest, to see if there are any still there.)

    Note that I'll be signing in San Diego this evening, and Mysterious Galaxy is well known for its willingness to get books to people. (They have a webstore which sells signed first editions across the world.) I'll bet if you call them today before 2pm Pacific, they'd be willing to get you a copy personalized and then ship it to you. Heck, if you call between 2 and 4, I'll bet that Dave and I are there signing still and you can tell me personally what you want me to write in your book.

    Mysterious Galaxy
    7051 Clairemont Mesa Blvd.
    Suite #302
    San Diego, CA 92111
    Tel: 858.268.4747

    Tags

  • 14

    Interview: Oct 12th, 2008

    Brandon Sanderson

    I've already gotten some emails from people who have seen the book [Mistborn: The Hero of Ages] on bookstore shelves! (Bookstores aren't always that good at paying attention to when a book is supposed to be out, and will often put it on shelves when it arrives. That's just fine; I can't imagine how difficult it would be to keep track of when each and every book's specific on-sale date is.) From today on, all sales count toward the 'first week' sales of the novel, so if you can find a copy early, go for it! (The 'first week' ends on Saturday. So there's only officially five days in the release week to pick up a copy.)

    I just sent out an email announcement to anyone who's emailed me through my website, so you might be getting one of those soon in your inbox. ;) In case you don't get one, the text is simple. Book Three is out on Tuesday! (Though the email is a lot more long winded.)

    Tags

  • 15

    Interview: Oct 12th, 2008

    Brandon Sanderson

    Anyway, for you Wheel of Time readers waiting for me to turn full attention back to A Memory of Light, this copyedit is the last big thing that I had on my plate. I still have to do an Alcatraz 3 copyedit in February or so, but it will be very short. I'm polishing off the last few bits of the Warbreaker copy edit now. The only question now—and it IS a big question—is how much I'll be able to work on A Memory of Light during book tour. I'm hoping to get back to 10k a week by writing in the car during Dave's turns driving or during points when I'm in the hotel waiting for a signing later in the night. We shall see! I'm going to give it my best shot.

    As always, folks, thanks for reading! And please consider picking up a copy of Hero of Ages this week. ;)

    Tags

  • 16

    Interview: Nov 8th, 2008

    Alex C. Telander

    How did you come up with the idea for the Mistborn series, and did you know it was going to be a series from the start?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I did know it was going to be a series. When I was writing Mistborn, it came because—well, I had sold Elantris, and my editor came to me and said, "What do you want to do next? Do you want to do an Elantris sequel?" And I said, well, I really like Elantris being a stand-alone. But I had this unique opportunity where the next book didn't have to be in for about two years. Sold Elantris in 2003; it was coming out in 2005. That meant my next book had to be turned in in 2005. Two years' time, I thought if I write really hard, I can finish an entire trilogy before the first one has to be turned in, which would let me write a whole series, and have it all work together and be internally consistent and all of these things. And so I did know it was a series from the beginning.

    The ideas are varied, they came from all over the place. One of the ideas was the desire to tell a story about a world where the dark lord had won. I love the classic fantasy stories, but I think that it's been done really well, and doesn't need to be done any more. I think Robert Jordan nailed it. I think, even if you look—you've got Tad Williams, you've got Raymond Feist, you've got David Eddings, you've got Terry Brooks—all doing this hero's archetype journey. It's been done, it's been covered, what else can I do? And so, the story where the hero went on a quest, and then failed and the dark lord took over, that was a fascinating idea.

    Another idea was my love of the heist genre, where you get a gang of specialists who each have a different power. I had never seen a fantasy book do that in the way I wanted to. There are some that do it, and do it well. But you know, where everyone had a different magic system, every person a different magic power, got together and did something. One of my favorite movies is the movie Sneakers—something like that, but with magic.

    And those two ideas rammed together with an idea for a magic system that I'd been working on, and an idea for a character I'm working on, Vin's character. Those were all developed independently. All started to ram together. I explained, ideas are sometimes like atoms and when they ram into each other, you get a chemical reaction and they form molecules. Cool different things happen when ideas ram into each other, and that's where those came from.

    ALEX C. TELANDER

    Do you think there's ever going to be any more stories or future books set in the Mistborn world?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I always know what happens in the futures of the worlds in my stories. I don't always write those books. I think there probably will be, but they would take place hundreds of years after this trilogy, or hundreds of years before. It would be great separation of time and space. It would be more books set in the world, not a continuation of the characters or sequels. I won't do that for a while. One of the authors who I really respect is Orson Scott Card. I like that he's able to do such different things, and new things, and he's not locked into. . . even though he keeps writing Ender's books, in between, you'll have all sorts of different, cool things. And I really respect that. I would rather do that than be someone who's writing in only one setting. And so, while you probably will see more Mistborn books, it's when I'm excited about them. I want to do something else for a while.

    Tags

  • 17

    Interview: Nov 8th, 2008

    Alex C. Telander

    It's a great honor to be chosen to complete Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes, it is.

    ALEX C. TELANDER

    How were you chosen?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    How was I chosen? I got up one morning, and there was a voicemail on my phone from someone that said, "Hello, Brandon Sanderson. This is Harriet Rigney, Robert Jordan's widow. I'd like you to call me. I have something I want to discuss with you."

    ALEX C. TELANDER

    Had you ever met her before or anything?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I'd never met her before. I had seen Robert Jordan once at a convention, been too embarrassed to go up and talk to him. I had not applied, or asked my agent to apply, or anything like this. I was known at Tor as a big fan of the series. I had also written on my web site some thoughts about what Robert Jordan's books had meant in my life. But none of it was really an attempt. . . I assumed somebody had already been chosen.

    ALEX C. TELANDER

    Right. Do you know if you were the only one on the list?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I know there were others on the list. I am not at liberty to say who they were. But, that first call was just a 'would you be willing?' And so I said, yes, of course. Well, what I actually said was, "aabbl, aabbbl, aabbbl. . ." I actually sent her an email the next day saying, "Dear Harriet, I'm not an idiot. I promise." I was just so surprised. And so, she then read Mistborn. She later told me, she said, "I got just 50 pages into it and I knew." But then she kept reading to make sure. She thought about it for about a month, she called me back. As I understand, she didn't ever look at any of the other people who were being considered, she just went with me. She really, really liked Mistborn.

    ALEX C. TELANDER

    That's pretty great!

    Tags

  • 18

    Interview: Nov 8th, 2008

    Alex C. Telander

    And I know you mentioned that this one, the children's series, has been optioned, you said, by Dreamworks?

    Brandon Sanderson

    It has been. Optioned by Dreamworks Animation.

    ALEX C. TELANDER

    And, how about any of your other books?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I've had offers on Mistborn, actually offers on Mistborn and on Elantris, that we have turned down. We're searching for the right project to do it. If I get the right—meaning somebody that I really think could make it—the people who offered on it before, I didn't think could actually make the movie. We had the feeling they were just trying to snatch up rights to keep a hold of them, and then hopefully it would get big and they could resell them later. They didn't seem like they were serious about making a movie. Fortunately, I'm in the position in life where I just don’t have to take the money. If someone offers me money, I can actually afford to say no. And in this case, I said no. With Dreamworks, it's a great company. They've done the Shrek movies, Kung Fu Panda. It was a great director, the director who directed Over the Hedge. And the producer was one of the producers on the Lemony Snicket movie. And I just thought, these guys can actually make a movie, they can make a good one. So we said yes.

    Tags

  • 19

    Interview: Jan 19th, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    Hey, it's time for me to send in corrections for the mass market version of Mistborn Three. I just wanted to throw out to the readers a question: Did any of you spot any big problems that were continuity/proofreading errors? Did I forget and use silver instead of tin anywhere? Use the wrong name for a character? That sort of thing. If you spotted a big proofreading error like this, feel free to drop me an email or post on my Livejournal to give me a heads up.

    Tags

  • 20

    Interview: Jan 22nd, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    I'll be doing a signing tonight at 7:30 at the Barnes and Noble at the Jordan Commons (EDIT: I mean JORDAN LANDING There's no bookstore at the Commons) in West Jordan Utah. If you live in the area, drop by! I'll happily sign books and chat.

    Also, it looks like Mistborn book one is finally up on audible. You should be able to find the audio edition other locations as well. Huzzah! Now just one more to go and the entire trilogy will be on audio.

    Here are two pieces of fanart from readers. The second one being the scene that I mentioned in annotations I'd like to see. We really need to get my fanart section up and running. I'll go poke Sprig (aka Jordo, aka my webmaster) on that one.

    Tags

  • 21

    Interview: Jan 23rd, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    Tags

  • 22

    Interview: Jan 26th, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    Some of you have noticed that Mistborn jewelry is for sale in my store. I'd suggest waiting for a few days before picking up any pieces, however, as we're checking with Badali on some items. I haven't finished writing copy for these either, so there aren't any descriptions, just pictures and prices. (And some of those prices may go down, specifically some of the shipping prices.) I'll start doing write-ups soon.

    Tags

  • 23

    Interview: Feb 5th, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    Tags

  • 24

    Interview: Feb 24th, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    I'm afraid I don't know when the Mistborn 2 audiobook will be out. A lot of people have been emailing me about this. I'd guess April (judging by the space between the book three release and the book one release.)

    I did want to give another mention to the Hugo Awards. I believe this is the last week for nominations, so if you have the inclination and are eligible (I.E. you went to Worldcon last year or have a membership to go this year) keep me in mind for Hero of Ages.

    Tags

  • 25

    Interview: Mar 13th, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    And, in other random news, a reader was googling mistcloaks for costume ideas and ran across this. Yes, that is what you fear it to be. A Mistborn Lolcat, posted randomly on Icanhascheezburger. Heaven help us all. (And thanks so much for that link, Jon.)

    Tags

  • 26

    Interview: Mar 24th, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    Much thanks to everyone who has pointed out to me that the Mistborn Two Audiobook just hit Audible. The trilogy is finally complete in this format; I apologize that it took so long to get them all up there.

    Tags

  • 27

    Interview: Mar 24th, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    If you didn't see the Mistborn Two deleted scenes, you might find them curious. Go drop by my forums to discuss.

    And, in parting, random comic strip.

    Tags

  • 28

    Interview: Apr 4th, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    First off, a very talented a reader and graphic designer just whipped up an awesome Mistborn wallpaper for any who are interested.

    I love how it looks. Thanks so much, John! That is very well done.

    Tags

  • 29

    Interview: Apr 4th, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    Now, how about some Reader Mail:

    I read your post about splitting A Memory of Light and thought your reasoning was very sound. It seems obvious that you care very much about putting out something of quality. I'm concerned though, that you won't end up changing what you write based on reader's reactions to the first book. How do you make sure the book/volumes you end up writing at 800k a year or so from now isn't different from the book you would have written if you had just done the whole thing in one big chunk?

    Excellent question. The answer is simple, yet may not be very satisfying. Honestly, I don't know if the book will turn out differently.

    It's rarely fruitful to second-guess decisions based on what might happen in the future. Every novel I read, every review that comes out, every day spent pondering . . . these things all influence my writing. Each day we make hundreds of decisions that nudge us in this direction or that. Scenes are influenced directly by events that occur in my life.

    Would Mistborn Three have been a different book if I hadn't stopped and written something else between it and Mistborn Two? Probably. Would it have been better or worse? I don't know. Will A Memory of Light Three be different because A Memory of Light One will be released before it comes out? Perhaps. Will it be better or worse? I don't know.

    I can say this. The second chunk should be done before the first comes out. And the third chunk saw a lot of work by Mr. Jordan before he passed away. So the structure isn't going to change, regardless. An author also has to learn not to let reviews or reader reactions influence him/her TOO much. Writing is a very solitary art, and the writer learns to trust their instincts. One of the early lessons to learn in writing is that feedback is good, but must be held at arm's length.

    If anything, knowing that there is one part out for readers to enjoy will take some of the pressure off of me and, hopefully, allow me to work more smoothly on the next two sections. Thanks for the question!

    Tags

  • 30

    Interview: Apr 13th, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    And, in all the fervor, I forgot to mention that Mistborn: The Hero of Ages is coming out in paperback at the end of this month. I thought the date was May, but it looks like Amazon has it for April 28th. They've been known to be wrong before—rather frequently, actually—but I have no reason to doubt this number. So look for it in stores then.

    Actually, we look like we're finally getting the support in B&N for my books. Their orders on Warbreaker are very large . . . intimidatingly so. As I've mentioned before, I'm paranoid about this book. Stand alone novels, no matter how good, have a larger chance of getting orphaned in the fantasy genre. Beyond that, we have yet to see what kind of impact giving the book away for free will have on the sales numbers. Anyway, it's coming early June. I'll be doing a release party and numbered copies, like on Hero of Ages. In fact, I think I've got the process far more streamlined, so there will be far less waiting in line this year. We're also hoping Sam Weller's will be able to do the mail-order numbered copies like they did before.

    I'll have more news on this in the coming weeks, once I have a chance to take a few deep breaths after getting A Memory of Light One turned in for good.

    Tags

  • 31

    Interview: Apr 15th, 2009

    Patrick

    How long does it take to write a book? (Just guestimate . . . )

    Brandon Sanderson

    Well, it honestly depends on the book. It's not just a matter of length, it's also a matter of complexity. The more viewpoints I'm trying to balance, and the deeper the setting, the longer the book will take. Also, it depends on what you call 'writing' a book—do you include all drafts, or just the rough? What about the planning? Here are a few estimates based on some of my books, drafting and planning time included.

    Alcatraz Vs. The Evil Librarians (50k words, one viewpoint.) 2-3 months.
    Elantris (200k words, three main viewpoints.) 6-8 months.
    Mistborn: The Hero of Ages (250k words, 5 main viewpoints.) 8-10 months.
    The Wheel of Time: The Gathering Storm (300k words. 21 viewpoints. Chunks outlined and written by Mr. Jordan already.) 16 months, pulling extra hours.

    So . . . imagine if I HADN'T had outlines and materials left by Mr. Jordan. It would probably have taken around 2 years to write a book that length. (Which, actually, was about how long it took Mr. Jordan to write a lot of his books.)

    Every author is different, however. Some write in bursts, some write slow and steady, a little each day. It's hard to judge exactly how long it will take you to write a book. There's no 'right' way to do it.

    Tags

  • 32

    Interview: May 7th, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    A few quick items. Hero of Ages has won the Romantic Times editor's choice award. Huzzah! I wasn't certain if I could announce this, but it looks like the magazine has shipped, so I think I can say it now. I'm deeply honored. The Romantic Times has done a very good job reaching across genre lines and honoring books they think deserve praise, regardless of their genre.

    In similar news, I can't remember if I mentioned it or not, but Hero has also been nominated for the David Gemmell Legend Award. This is an honor for two reasons—first, because Mr. Gemmell himself was such a fantastic author. But also because this is a reader-voted award, which means that you all took the time to stop by and give me a nominating vote. That means a lot to me. Thank you so much! I believe that the final winner is also chosen by a vote from readers, so if you feel so inclined, you can vote for Hero to win. You don't even have to register to do so.

    Finally, I have a small stock of copies of the Alcatraz Versus the Evil Librarians hardcover on hand, and that is getting hard to find in stores, so I thought I'd offer them for sale and personalization. I'll probably do another post on this later, going more in-depth, but if you haven't tried Alcatraz, this would be the perfect chance.

    Tags

  • 33

    Interview: May 7th, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    PROJECT SIX: WARBREAKER, ELANTRIS, MISTBORN SEQUELS

    Maybe someday. Time isn't right for any of them, I'm afraid. You'll see some of them in the future, though, and will probably get some Mistborn short stories sometime this year.

    Tags

  • 34

    Interview: May 15th, 2009

    Dave Brendon

    You have amassed a well-loved body of work, attaching your name to epic fantasy even before being approached to finish A Memory of Light; will you please tell us about your work, and why a reader who has never read your work should buy and read a copy of Elantris, the Mistborn series or Warbreaker?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I love epic fantasy, but I’m of the generation who grew up reading Robert Jordan and Tad Williams and are now trying to say, what else can we do with the genre? I want to write books that feel like the great epic fantasies of the past that you’ve read, but don’t use the same, familiar stories. In Mistborn, for example, the idea was to turn the standard fantasy story on its head–what if the prophesied hero failed and the Dark Lord took over and has ruled the known world for the last thousand years? My books are also known for their spectacular, interesting magic systems that are very rule based and almost a science unto themselves. But of course none of that matters without characters whose motivations you can understand and who you can care about as a reader. In Elantris I have three very different main viewpoint characters, and readers are fairly evenly divided on who’s their favorite–in writing as in anything else, it’s impossible to please everyone all the time, but I’m happy that my books have shown so many different people a character they can relate to and root for.

    Between writing Mistborn 2 and Mistborn 3, I wanted to try something new, and my series of humorous middle-grade novels beginning with Alcatraz Versus the Evil Librarians was the result. I love epic fantasy, and don’t intend to ever stop writing it. However, sometimes we all need a diversion toward something more lighthearted. If you want to get a taste of what my writing is like, because Alcatraz is so different from my other books I recommend that unless you’re between the ages of ten and thirteen you start with the first Mistborn book—or Elantris or Warbreaker. Mistborn is a good entry point for people who like trilogies and series (and the writing is better in Mistborn than in Elantris; I can see how much I have improved over the years). The other two are good entry points for people who prefer standalones–and Warbreaker is available for free on my website (as well as coming out in hardcover in North America from Tor next month), so it may be the most convenient starting point of all.

    Tags

  • 35

    Interview: May 15th, 2009

    Dave Brendon

    How has finishing (and it’s not completely done yet, guys and girls) A Memory of Light changed your life? Are you still the same Brandon Sanderson you were before A Memory of Light?

    Brandon Sanderson

    It’s far from completely done! The first part of the three, The Gathering Storm, is turned in and in production, and I’m only about halfway through the second part’s rough draft. There’s a lot of writing left to go. But working on the Wheel of Time has forced me to grow immensely as a writer. Back when I sold Elantris to Tor, they were interested in following that with the book I was working on at the time, called The Way of Kings. But I felt my career and writing skills weren’t yet in the right place to pull off the ten-volume epic fantasy series that I wanted that book to lead into, so I wrote the Mistborn trilogy instead. Now, after working on the Wheel of Time for over a year, I finally feel ready to dive in and do a revision of The Way of Kings. If I can effectively use all I’ve learned, I might be able to make the book become what I want it to be.

    Tags

  • 36

    Interview: Jun 1st, 2009

    Damon Cap

    And as you touch on that, your books that you've written yourself focus—let's not say heavily on religion, but your character has a religious foundation per se, and Jordan on the other end of the spectrum; there's really not that formalized sort of religion.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yeah, there's spirituality, but not religion.

    DAMON CAP

    And how did you, as a writer that usually writes in that, you know… How did that make a difference for you? How did you have to approach it; did you have to make changes in the way that you write because of that?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    You know, that's not one specific thing that I felt I had to change a lot about. The truth is, for any given fantasy work you're working on, there are certain things that draw a lot of your attention, that you focus on, and certain things you don't. When I wrote my kids' series, there's no religion in those. That just wasn't important for the world-building and the setting for those books. And I've written other books where religion is very important. Religion fascinates me. I'm a religious person. And because of that, I feel that the misuse of religion can be one of the greatest evils in the world. And so, you see me delving into that sort of thing and just the different approaches on religion. You know, I love to deal with different types of religion and all that sort of stuff. But I think Robert Jordan's approach is very interesting. And I've always liked his approach to it. Like I said, there's a spirituality without a religion. And...the Wheel of Time, that's not an area that's focused on a lot. And so, it was a very easy transition for me. Different books, you spend your efforts on in different places.

    On Elantris, I spent a long time on the languages. On Mistborn, I didn't. Because in Mistborn, it wasn't... The world just didn't revolve around the way that languages work. We had an all-oppressive dictator God King who had forced everyone to kind of adopt the same language. Beyond that, the books were taking place at the center capital of the world where everyone spoke the same language. So there weren't even... You know, there were little dialects here and there, but I didn't focus on language there. Whereas I did in Elantris. The same thing with different books, so...

    Tags

  • 37

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Nadine

    You have created some fantastic, original and well thought out magical systems. Where did you get the inspiration for the metal-based system of the Mistborn series and the breath-based system of Warbreaker?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Thank you! During the early days of my career—before I got published—I found myself naturally creating a new magic system for each book I wrote. I'm not sure why I did this. I just found the process too involving, too interesting, to stop.

    For Mistborn, I came to the book wanting several things. I wanted a great magic system that would enhance the graceful, martial-arts style fights. This was going to be a series of sneaking thieves, assassins, and night-time exploration. And so I developed the powers with a focus on that idea. What would make the thieving crew better at what they did? I based each power around an archetype of a thieving crew. The Thug, the Sneak, the Fast-talker, etc.

    At the same time, I wanted to enhance the 'industrial revolution' feel of the novels through the magic system. I wanted something that felt like an industrial-age science, something that was a good hybrid of science and magic. I found myself drawn to Alchemy and its use of metals, then extrapolated from that to a way to release power locked inside of metal. Metabolism grew out of that. It felt natural. We metabolize food for energy; letting Allomancers metabolize metal had just the right blend of science and magic.

    For Warbreaker, I was looking back a little further, shooting for a more Renaissance-era feel. And so, I extrapolated from the early beliefs that similarities created bonds. In other words, you could affect an object (in this case, bring an object to life) by creating a bond between it and yourself, letting it take on a semblance of your own life.

    Moving beyond that was the idea of color as life. When a person dies, their color drains from them. The same happens when plants die. Vibrant color is a sign of life itself, and so I worked with this metaphor and the concept of Breath as life to develop the magic. In this case, I wanted magical powers that would work better 'in' society, meaning things that would enhance regular daily lives. Magical servants and soldiers, animated through arcane powers, worked better for this world than something more strictly fighting-based, like in Mistborn.

    Tags

  • 38

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    carmen22

    How long did it take for you to complete the Mistborn trilogy?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I wrote the entire trilogy, straight through, starting in the beginning of 2003 and ending in early 2006.

    carmen22

    How much research, if any, went into the making of the Mistborn trilogy?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I did quite a bit, mostly reading about the era of the industrial revolution, alongside researching alchemy and eunuchs.

    Tags

  • 39

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    carmen22

    To further the above question by Nadine: How did you ever keep the unique power systems all straight and use them so well for your readers to understand?

    The powers, to me, were just so fascinating, well developed, and unique on so many levels! I think with a lesser artist than yourself the powers might have been too much to take in, but I found them quite easy to follow and understand. Just amazing! You seriously are one of my favorite authors. I'll be in line for all of your books!

    Brandon Sanderson

    Thanks! It took a lot of practice. Keeping them straight for myself isn't so difficult—it's like keeping characters straight. The more I've written, the easier it's become.

    What is more difficult is keeping it all straight for the readers. This can be tough. One of the challenges with fantasy is what we call the Learning Curve. It can be very daunting to pick up a book and find not only new characters, but an entirely new world, new physics, and a lot of new words and names.

    I generally try to introduce this all at a gentle curve. In some books, like Warbreaker, starting with the magic system worked. But in Mistborn, I felt that it was complex enough—and the setting complex enough—that I needed to ease into the magic, and so I did it bit by bit, with Vin.

    In all things, practice makes perfect. I have a whole pile of unpublished novels where I didn't do nearly as good a job of this. Even still, I think I have much to learn. In the end of Mistborn One and Warbreaker both I think I leave a little too much confusion about the capabilities of the magic.

    Tags

  • 40

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    carmen22

    And last but definitely not least, you seem to have left the New World of Mistborn open for a book maybe featuring Spook in the future, any thoughts?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I did leave it open. But that's partially because I feel that part of any good book is the indication that the characters continue to live, the world continues to turn. I want readers to be free to imagine futures for the characters and more stories in the world.

    For Mistborn, I'm not planning—right now—to do any Spook books. I do have plans to do another trilogy set in the world, though it would take place hundreds of years later, once technology has caught up to what it should be. Essentially, think guns, cars, skyscrapers—and Allomancers.

    Tags

  • 41

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Melhay

    Some of us have been picking books that have some mystery to them. We have stopping points in the books where we discuss what we have read, any questions we have, then try to speculate ahead for what is to come. Your books have worked extremely well for these, along with completely enjoying the readings. But, we had a few questions we were still a little curious about. So, I am going to be a little on the specific side for just a few things.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Needless to say, this will have some major spoilers for the Mistborn series. So turn back now if you don't want to read them.

    Melhay

    In Mistborn: There was mention of a man named Adonalsium. We were wondering if this man may have been Preservation, who "died" before Vin took over. Is that who he was or was he someone else?

    Brandon Sanderson

    The man who died before Vin took over was named Leras. (I've occasionally written it as Laras. I've said the names in my head for years, but I'm only now writing them down as people ask me on forums.) Leras, like Ati (aka Ruin), were NOT Adonalsium. (Sorry about the typo on that one in Mistborn 3. I wrote it down on the manuscript, and it didn't get put in quite right. We'll get it fixed.)

    Adonalsium was something or someone else. You will find out more. There are clues in Warbreaker and The Way of Kings.

    Melhay

    In Mistborn #3 Hero of Ages: It isn't mentioned where all the Steel Inquisitors, Kandra, and Koloss went in the end. Do you feel that they were removed from the world and Sazed took all the lost souls to his better place?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Marsh survived. (He'll show up in the Mistborn sequel series.) The Kandra were restored, and have taken a vow to live only in animal bodies. There will never be any more of them, but they are functionally immortal. So you'll see them again. The Koloss who were in the cavern at the time survived, and were changed to become a race that breeds true, rather than Hemalurgic monsters. More below.

    Melhay

    Also, We just took for granted that Sazed is with Tindwyl now. Is that so?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Well, here's the thing. What Sazed is right now is something of a god in the classic Greek sense—a superpowered human being, elevated to a new stage of existence. Not GOD of all time and space. In a like manner, there are things that Sazed does not have power over. For instance, he couldn't bring Vin and Elend back.

    Where Tindwyl exists is beyond space and time, in a place Sazed hasn't learned to touch yet. He might yet. If you want to add in your heads him working through that, feel free. But as it stands at the end of the book, he isn't yet with Tindwyl. (He is, however, with Kelsier—who refused to "Go toward the light" so to speak, and has been hanging around making trouble ever since he died. You can find hints of him in Mistborn 3 at the right moments.

    Melhay

    Of the people that were sick for the 16 days in comparison to just the one day, it is mentioned that they would be able to burn more precious metals (atium). Could it also be possible they are/were Mistborn—with the ability to burn all 16 metals?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Well, what was going on here was a clue established and set by Leras before he died. He wanted something to indicate—should he be unable to inform mankind—that what was happening wasn't natural, but instead something intentional. He worried that men wouldn't be able to realize they were being made into Allomancers.

    And so, the mist was set to do something very specific, as has to do with the interaction between the human soul, Allomancy, and the sixteen metals.

    Each of the 'Shardworlds' I've written in (Mistborn, Elantris, Warbreaker, Way of Kings) exists with the same cosmology. All things exist on three realms—the spiritual, the cognitive, and the physical. What's going on here is an interaction between the three realms. I don't want to bore you with my made up philosophy, but I do have a cohesive metaphysical reasoning for how my worlds and magic works. And there is a single plane of existence—called Shadesmar, the Cognative Realm—which connects them all.

    You will never need to know any of this to read and enjoy my books, but there is an overarching story behind all of them, going on in the background. Adonalsium, Hoid, the origin of Ati, Leras, the Dor, and the Voice (from Warbreaker) are all tied up in this.

    Tags

  • 42

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Liago

    Paul recently wrote an article about loving maps in stories and it inspired these questions from me.

    How do you come up with and create the maps for your novels? Is it a process of thought while creating the story itself or does it come later once you've written the story as a means to depict the places you've written about? Also do you scetch them yourself before having them drawn or is the process usually entirely done by a separate artist?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I usually sketch myself out something vague to use as reference, then make it more and more detailed as I work through the book. At that point, I approach and artist and have them help me come up with a good visual style for the book and the map. If it's an artist I know well, I can sometimes let them do more of the work—the Mistborn maps, for instance, were developed by Isaac with very little input from me beyond the text and some basic instructions.

    Tags

  • 43

    Interview: Jun 1st, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    Hey, all, there are several things I want to talk about, so I'm just going to attack them in order. (And if you work at Adobe, or know someone who does, make sure you read the last thing on my list.)

    Warbreaker

    I doubt you need a reminder, but the launch of Warbreaker is only about a week away! Barnes and Noble has kindly decided to put it into one of their big summer promotions, and has ordered a LOT of copies. This is fantastic, since—if you've been reading the blog for a few years—you know that we've consistently had troubles with distribution at Barnes and Noble. Well, they've thrown themselves behind this book a great deal. Finally. So, of course, my natural panic rises that now we won't sell any copies, will prove them right for not supporting the Mistborn books to the extent we wanted, and go back to the old model of never having enough copies out. (Sigh. Sorry, it's hard to not worry about these things.)

    Anyway, if you want a numbered/personalized edition, I'm happy to comply—so long as supplies last. But know that if you want to buy the book at your local B&N, Borders, or independent bookseller, I'm going to be touring a great deal over the next two years—so the chances are good I'll be able to get that copy of yours signed.

    There WILL be audio editions; I suspect they'll be out a few weeks after the hardcover. There WILL be an official ebook edition to buy, if you want one—and in order to sweeten that deal, we're probably going to be selling the ebook directly through Tor.com with ALL of the annotations included months, even years, before I get them posted on my website. There should be a special deal of some sort for those who bought the hardcover to get the ebook (with annotations) for a fraction of the regular price, but I'm not sure what it will be. You might have to order both through Tor.com, or maybe there will be a rebate. So if you're thinking of getting both editions to grab the annotations and bonus content, then save your receipt on the hardcover just in case. No promises, but maybe there will be something Tor does to promote.

    The edition in stores does have new scenes that aren't in the edition posted to my website. I will eventually post the pdf to my website of the final edition, though I'm not sure when I'll do that, as I don't want to undercut all of the special effort Tor.com has put into coming up with really nice ebook edition with bonus content. We'll see.

    Tags

  • 44

    Interview: Jun 23rd, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    The folks over at Garden Ninja studio wrote to let me know that a BSCreview.com is doing a contest where they're giving away some minis. This week, it's a contest for a set of Goblin Quest minis (from the book series.) They'll have Mistborn minis for give away next week, but I thought you might want to head over this week to get in on the Goblin Quest ones as well.

    Also, a kindly reader sent me some fanart of Vin. Thought you guys might like to see it.

    Tags

  • 45

    Interview: Jul 7th, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    Now, the big news. At about 6:00 am this morning, I finished The Way of Kings rewrite. It ended up at 380k words, which is almost double the length of Mistborn [The Final Empire]. (It's almost as long as The Shadow Rising, by Robert Jordan.) Now, before you get TOO excited about that size, know that I tend to write too much on a first draft intentionally, and now plan to trim it down by at least 10%. The final book should be between 300k and 350k. Either way, though, it's going to be a meaty book. (Not long for long's sake, mind you. That's just what it took to tell the story the right way.)

    How did it turn out? Well, to be honest, it's FANTASTIC. This is a monstrous, beastly, awesome epic of a book. And so I'm going to give Tor the official thumbs up so they can put it on the schedule for release next year. The series title, if you haven't heard, is going to be called THE STORMLIGHT ARCHIVE.

    The book does everything I wanted it to, and then some. It was a lot more work to revise it than I'd anticipated. I essentially ended up writing the thing all over again, not keeping any of what had been written before. But knowing the characters already helped a great deal. (And if you guys ever see my wife at a convention, make sure to give her a thanks and a hug for deal with a husband who has been essentially working two full time jobs for much of this year—one on Kings, one on THE WHEEL OF TIME.)

    Like any time I finish a book, there's still that itching, authorial paranoia that nobody is going to like what I've done. I have chosen a career path where, instead of releasing all of my books in one series, I jump around. I've done this partially because I want the freedom to reinvent myself. Some of my favorite authors growing up seemed unable to give new life to a series when they started it, and ended up repeating the very same story and tone over and over. I wanted to train myself to be doing new things, and wanted the freedom to write different books in different ways.

    I know I'm not as wildly different in my variation as some other authors, but at the same time, there's a different feel to each book/series I've done. Hopefully, all will have great characters, a fun setting, and a compelling plot. But there will always be those who prefer Elantris's thoughtful contemplativeness to Mistborn's action or Warbreaker's reversals and humor. Each time I've released a new book, I've worried. Will my audience follow me in this (slightly) new direction? What will they think of what I've done?

    Kings is no different. In fact, it's got me even more worried. My goal for this book was to give it SCOPE. The setting is the most distinctive I've written, with the largest world and the largest number of cultures and peoples. The book (though mostly linear) involves flashbacks to character pasts, and sometimes firsthand looks at the deep past of the world. At the same time, because of the enormity of what I'm trying, I found that the book couldn't telegraph as easily what it was about.

    What does this mean? Well, Mistborn and Elantris both did excellent jobs of telegraphing to the reader—right off—what the story was going to be about. After the first few chapters of Mistborn, you pretty much knew that it would be a book about Kelsier's attempt to overthrow the Lord Ruler, mixed with Vin's training as a Mistborn. Elantris was about Raoden trying to restore Elantris, Sarene investigating his disappearance, and Hrathen's attempts to convert the people. Because of the scope of these books, I was able to get across very easily what they would be about and what the central conflict would be.

    Kings . . . well, I have trouble describing what the heck Kings is about. While there are a number of plots bouncing around in those 380k words—and many of them do get resolved—the larger storylines are only just beginning. The book isn't about one or two things, like Mistborn was. It's about dozens. And yet, the main character's plotline is simple: survival. He's in a terrible, brutal situation, and he just wants to live.

    Anyway, the book needs a lot more revision, but it's in a state where I think we'll make it. So send a little good will my way as I dig into it over the next eight months. Maybe I'll be able to come up with a way to describe this beast.

    Tags

  • 46

    Interview: Jul 23rd, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    Well, now that The Way of Kings rewrite is finished, I've moved on to the next thing on my plate: Alcatraz Book Four. (And if you're wondering why the heck I'm working on this instead of on WoT 13, I did a blog post warning about all this earlier in the summer.)

    I was planning on putting off Alcatraz until September/October, but over the summer I realized that I needed to do it in July. It's time for a break. I've been working on the WoT straight since January 2008. Eighteen months is the longest I've ever spent on the same project, and I'm feeling that I need to step back from it for a short time and let my mind recharge. So I won't be doing any new WoT material for the next month or so. (Though I will be working on outlines and plans for the next sections.)

    You can track the progress on Alcatraz via the progress bars. My goal right now is to be done with Alcatraz by the time I'm back from Worldcon, and be through with the new outlines for WoT 13 by September 1st. The book is almost 2/3 done, so things still look good for getting it in by January.

    It's kind of interesting, sometimes, to step back and look at the process of how this writing thing all works for me. I think that my early years of writing have had a lot to do with how I now write. People talk about my productivity sometimes. I think a lot of it has to do with how I jump from project to project to stay fresh. The first Alcatraz book came from me needing to do something new between books two and three of Mistborn, and over the last few years, they've been wonderful opportunities to renew myself.

    Perhaps I've got writing ADD. (Of course, I don't know if you can call it that, since I generally stick to a project for six or eight months before hopping to a new one.) But I think this all goes back to the fact that I wrote thirteen different books (most of them in different worlds) during my unpublished days. I always hopped to something new every few months, and that kept me excited about writing.

    Tags

  • 47

    Interview: Sep 8th, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    In the most recent Mistborn 3 Annotations I discuss Demoux, Elend's white uniform, and happy obligators, Elend's leadership and the number sixteen (includes major spoilers, though they are hidden by default), and the disappearance of Feruchemists. If you find the annotations interesting, you can discuss them over in my forums.

    Tags

  • 48

    Interview: Sep 14th, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    In this week's Writing Excuses podcast, debut author John Brown (whose book Servant of a Dark God comes out from Tor two weeks before The Gathering Storm—need an epic fantasy to tide you over?) joins us to discuss how to avoid making your characters sound just like you. We also put up an acceptance speech for the Parsec Award we won at Dragon*Con, but it's probably better to pretend I didn't just link it. . . .

    Finally, in the most recent Mistborn 3 annotation, I discuss Clubs' backstory. Give it a look.

    Tags

  • 49

    Interview: Sep 28th, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    In this week's Writing Excuses podcast, John Brown rejoins Howard, Dan, and me for a discussion of how to avoid repeating yourself as a writer. And the most recent Mistborn 3 annotation covers wide-ranging topics from nostalgia to Tolkien and Hoid.

    Tags

  • 50

    Interview: Oct 5th, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    In the most recent annotations for Mistborn 3, I discuss guns in fantasy and other perceived anachronisms. I also talk about Breeze and Sazed's relationship in the period since the end of Mistborn 2. On many occasions I have details worked out that just don't end up in the book. Some of them go into the deleted scenes section of the Library, but many others end up in the annotations. If you're the type of fan who is always wondering what happens between the lines of my books, the annotations are for you.

    Tags

  • 51

    Interview: Oct 12th, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    I haven't really mentioned it on the blog here, but I am going to be the toastmaster at MileHiCon in Denver next weekend, October 23rd through 25th. I'll post a specific schedule next week of where you'll find me at the con. I'll also be doing a signing on the 22nd at the Koelbel Library in Centennial that's open to all (convention registration not required). This is all before the release of The Gathering Storm, though, so Denver residents should also keep in mind that I'll be back in town on November 1st during the book tour. For details please see my Events page.

    I'm going to be signing and personalizing Sam Weller's Bookstore's copies of The Gathering Storm on October 19th starting at 5:00 p.m. Mountain Time, so if you want to order a copy from them, that is the last moment you can request a personalization. They'll still accept orders after that for the remainder of the signed stock, but you'll be limited to a signature and a number unless you call them before 5:00 on the 19th. For details please see Item #4 on the Release Events page.

    The limited-edition Mistborn Table of Allomantic Metals art prints have been delivered here to Dragonsteel Entertainment headquarters, and artist Isaac Stewart and I will be signing them tonight. We'll start taking orders probably tomorrow; expect a big announcement here on the blog.

    In this week's Writing Excuses podcast, Dan, Howard, and I talk with Larry Correia, author of Monster Hunter International, about plot-driven vs. character-driven fiction. Go check it out!

    The most recentMistborn 3 annotations involve the trilogy's first ball scene in quite a while. Chapter 30 was a lot of fun for me to write; I hope it gave many readers fond memories of Mistborn 1. Part 1, Part 2.

    Tags

  • 52

    Interview: Oct 8th, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    Also, note that the Mistborn Posters are almost ready. We'll be doing a big announcement about them next week.

    Tags

  • 53

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    BenFoley

    You have stated in your blog that Mistborn had three magic systems (Allomancy, Feruchemy and Hemurology) and also that The Way of Kings will have upwards of 20. For comparison, how many magic systems would you say the Wheel of Time series has? Two (One Power and the True Power)? How do you classify other abilities (not necessarily related to the One Power or True Power) such as Dreamwalking, viewing the Pattern, Wolfbrother-hoodness, and changing 'luck' or chance? Would you classify these abilities as a magic system in and of themselves? Has your chance to see the background material Robert Jordan left changed how you view these abilities?

    Brandon Sanderson

    This kind of gets sticky, as it's all up to semantics. Really, you could say that Mistborn had a different magic system for each type of Misting. But at the same time, you could argue that something like X-Men—with huge numbers of powers—all falls under the same blanked 'magic system.' And take Hemalurgy in Mistborn 3—is it a new magic system, or just a reinterpretation of Allomancy and Feruchemy?

    So what do I mean by twenty or thirty magic systems in Kings? Hard to say, as I don't want to give spoilers. I have groupings of abilities that have to deal with a certain theme. Transformation, Travel, Pressure and Gravity, that sort of thing. By one way of counting, there are thirty of these—though by another way of grouping them together, there are closer to ten.

    Anyway, I'd say that the Wheel of Time has a fair number of Magic systems. The biggest one would be the One Power/True Power, which is more of a blanket "Large" magic system kind of like Allomancy being a blanket for sixteen powers—only the WoT magic system is far larger. I'd count what Perrin/Egwene do in Tel'aran'rhiod as a different magic system. What Mat does as something else, the Talents one can have with the Power something else. Though I'd group all of the Foretelling/Viewing powers into one.

    Sounds like a topic for a paper, actually. Any of you academics out there feel like writing one?

    Let's just say that The Wheel of Time has a smaller number of larger magic systems, and I tend to use a larger number of smaller magic systems. Confusing enough? ;)

    Tags

  • 54

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Sensitivemuse

    Are you going to write more about the Mistborn? There's still those mysterious metals, and it's a brand new world out there now so many possibilities you could do with that!

    Brandon Sanderson

    I will, someday, write a follow-up trilogy to Mistborn. It will be set several hundred years after the events of the first trilogy, after technology has caught up to where it should be. Essentially, these will be urban fantasy stories set in the same world. Guns, cars, skyscrapers—and Allomancers.

    That's still pretty far off, though. The other metals are being revealed on the poster I'm releasing of the Allomantic table. Should be for sale on my website sometime soon, though someone here can probably link to the image I posted of it, which has the other metals explained. (I can't remember where exactly that link is right now.)

    Hero of the new trilogy would be a nicrosil Misting.

    Sensitivemuse

    Also, was there an inspiration for Vin and if so who/what was it?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Vin has been hard for me to pin down, inspiration wise. I tried so many different variations on her character (even writing her character as a boy) that it's hard to pinpoint when I got it right. There was no one single inspiration for her. (Unlike Sarene, who was based on a friend of mine.) She's a mix of my sisters, a good writer friend of mine, and a dozen different other little bits of people.

    The time when I got her character RIGHT was when I wrote the scene that became her first in Mistborn, where she's watching the ash blow in the street, and envies it for its freedom. That, mixed with Kelsier's observation that she isn't a bad person—she just thinks everyone else is—were the big points where her character took form.

    Tags

  • 55

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Nightfire

    Now my interest is perked. Which character is in both Mistborn and Elantris? I must know!! Of course, if it is a secret for another book don't tell me.

    Brandon Sanderson

    I suggest looking through my forums and talking to the people there. Also, some questions on this forum talk about the issue. I don't like to spell things out, and so I stay away from giving too much. Look around; it's not to difficult to find, now that people have begun to catch on.

    Tags

  • 56

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Zas678

    I have some more in-depth questions that might be RAFO'd. For fans who want to know what I'm talking about, go here. Here they are:

    Who is Hoid in Well of Ascension? We (TWG) have found some candidates:

    Wolfhound merchant
    Terris person that Elend meets after Vin went back to Luthadel
    Teur or old Jed (the two Skaa in the first Sazed chapter)
    Crazy cannibal Skaa (I doubt it though)

    We already know it isn't the man who discovered duralumin, or the Skaa leader outside the dress shop, or the old Skaa who waits with the Holy First Witness when the Koloss attack.

    I think those were all of the characters that we found as candidates.

    Brandon Sanderson

    People are really close to this one, and I noticed that later in this thread, you or someone else mentioned the footprints in the deleted scene.

    Hoid's appearance in Mistborn: Well of Ascension is a little unlike the others. When the scene at the Well was moved in revision, one of Hoid's major influences on the book had to go (for various reasons). Left in the book is only one little hint, really. A character notices something odd about someone, but doesn't dwell on it. You can probably find the line if you look very closely.

    Let me say this. Hoid got wrapped up in things he didn't expect to be involved in, and they dominated much of his time during the events of Mistborn: Well of Ascension. He spent most of the book in a different place from most of the viewpoint characters. He's only near them for a very short time, and he's deeply in disguise. I couldn't include his name, as he'd never have used the name "Hoid" for himself there, because it wouldn't have been right for the disguise. He'd have used another pseudonym. (He didn't, by the way, mention one.)

    I've probably said too much already. Now, perhaps what people should asking me is this: "What has Hoid been up to in all of these books?" Or, maybe they shouldn't ask me, as I wouldn't be likely to answer. (There are clues in the novels, however.) No, he's not just hanging out. Yes, I know what he's been doing. Will I write his scenes some day? Maybe. We'll see. There may be short stories posted on my website.

    Tags

  • 57

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Zas678

    My last question shouldn't be as hard to answer and that is: Who is in charge of the Mistborn movie you mentioned at the #tweettheauthor?

    Thank you so much, I love your books!

    Brandon Sanderson

    It is a small production studio, so nobody you'd recognize. The producer is a fan of the Mistborn books who has some credentials in independent films, and who has impressed me with his treatment of the books and his determination to make the film. This individual is starting a production company to focus on the film. We're in the contract stages now, and once that is done, I can be more specific.

    It's not like the Alcatraz movie, which was optioned directly by a studio. Because of that, the Mistborn movie is probably a lot less likely to happen—but, the hands it is in are quite good. Anything having to do with Hollywood is a long-shot in the first place, so (after meeting with the producer) I decided that I'd rather take the slightly more unlikely chance in exchange for the opportunity to work with someone I felt understood the books.

    Tags

  • 58

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    iwinUlose2

    In Mistborn 3, What happened to Kelsier's bones, and will they play any significance in any of the sequels?

    Brandon Sanderson

    The bones survived the events of the last book. We might see them again. Speaking of relic-like items, Sazed's rings survived as well. We might see those again.

    Tags

  • 59

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Melhay

    Is Adonalsium going to be mentioned by name in Warbreaker and The Way of Kings or is he going to be an underlining "God"(I don't know what to call him yet) idea? I am curious now, so I will have to keep my eyes open for him.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Adonalsium (Ahy-doe-Nahl-see-um) will be mentioned by name again. Ruin and Preservation were what have been called Shards of Adonalsium. (The Voice from Warbreaker is another Shard.)

    Tags

  • 60

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    little_wilson

    She (and I) would also like to know more details of the Mistborn movie. The last she heard, you'd rejected it being a TV series. So, yeah. Any more details?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Did a big post on this just above. I think that will answer the request for details.

    Note that I rejected the tv series not because of the idea of doing a tv series itself, but because I wasn't confident in the production studio who was making the offer. More details will come once contracts are signed.

    Tags

  • 61

    Interview: Nov 3rd, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    You also may have noticed that I've put up a new item in the store—a holiday bundle of all three Mistborn hardbacks (signed) at a special price with the popular Steel Alphabet Medallion thrown in. And a note on shipping for the holiday season: to make sure a package arrives by December 24th, December 7th is the last day my assistant Becky can take orders with standard shipping. Orders upgraded to Priority shipping can be made as late as December 12th (the Mistborn bundle gets a free upgrade).

    Tags

  • 62

    Interview: Nov 5th, 2009

    Shannon Berndston

    After dinner we trekked over to the Harvard Coop for the signing. Brandon introduced the book. He talked a bit about what the Wheel of Time series means to him, and how he became a writer in the first place.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Did you know that he wrote 13 books before getting one of them published? Elantris was number six in that list, but he never gave up on his dream of being a writer. We also heard about how Harriet read Brandon’s eulogy for RJ and subsequent read of Mistborn. After two chapters, she was hooked and knew that he was the man to finish her husband’s series.

    Tags

  • 63

    Interview: Nov 7th, 2009

    Question

    Regarding the Mistborn books, do you think you will ever write a prequel trilogy?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Brandon is hesitant to do so. He has considered it though. He [Brandon] "loves epic fantasy" and the "hero's journey, like Rand's journey at the beginning of the Wheel of Time". When writing the Mistborn books, he knew Robert Jordan had done epic fantasy the best it could be done, so thought to himself, 'what hasn’t been done?' The answer he came to was 'what if the hero [e.g.] Rand/Harry Potter/Frodo lost?' The idea was a good one, but that would make a "downer of a book".

    Meg Lurvey

    (The fans, myself included, chuckled slightly horrified at the idea of the Dark One winning, and one fan made a reference to the Star Wars prequels, which also amused the crowd, and Brandon alike.)

    Brandon Sanderson

    Brandon went on to say that he wrote Mistborn as 1000 years after the heroes lost, and he is more strongly considering a sequel trilogy that would take place about 600 years after Mistborn.

    Tags

  • 64

    Interview: Oct 30th, 2009

    Peter Ahlstrom

    Tags

  • 65

    Interview: Nov 10th, 2009

    Peter Ahlstrom

    Speaking of Writing Excuses, in this week's episode comics writer Jake Black fills in for Brandon to talk with Dan and Howard about writing comics. Check it out.

    Finally, in the most recent Mistborn 3 annotations, Brandon mentions talking scenes and the number sixteen, the loss of half the sieging Koloss, and everyone's favorite Koloss, Human.

    Tags

  • 66

    Interview: Nov 10th, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    Brandon said there would be a sequel trilogy to Mistborn and also a short story spin-off that would likely be posted online.

    Tags

  • 67

    Interview: Nov 17th, 2009

    Peter Ahlstrom

    This week's Writing Excuses podcast covers the business of writing comics, again with Jake Black filling in for Brandon (whose we-don't-ever-discuss-it stint writing the webcomic "American Bachelors with Mecha(s)" is not nearly as relevant as Jake Black's professional experience in the industry).

    In the most recent Mistborn 3 annotations, Brandon talks about Preservation's power and the working mechanism of Hemalurgy. He specifically does not say anything about Adonalsium. Writers can be so cruel.

    Tags

  • 68

    Interview: Jan 4th, 2010

    Brandon Sanderson

    This week's episode of Writing Excuses . . . wait, now that I think about it, Writing Excuses should also be eligible for a Best Related Work Hugo nomination. Huh . . . that would be an even more unlikely coup than our Parsec Award win last year. Well anyway, this week's podcast episode discusses collaboration.

    In the most recent Mistborn 3 annotations, I talk about Lord Fedre and some spoilers as well as Vin's attempt to defeat the sedative.

    Tags

  • 69

    Interview: Dec 1st, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    Then there's my own podcast. Though they did a fine job without me during the tour (such as in last week's episode about NaNoWriMo—by the way, how many of my fans won this year?), Howard Tayler and Dan Wells were happy to have me back for this week's Writing Excuses episode where we discussed mixing humor with drama and horror. Check it out.

    I've gotten a bit behind in mentioning the Mistborn 3 annotations. The most recent additions mention the creation of Inquisitors and how to defeat Ruin, Spook as the Survivor of the Flames, Marsh *spoiler*ing Penrod, and Yomen's backstory.

    Tags

  • 70

    Interview: Feb 22nd, 2010

    Brandon Sanderson

    In the most recent Mistborn 3 annotations, I discuss Vin's defense before Yomen and what happened to Janarle. And in this week's Writing Excuses podcast, Dan, Howard, James Dashner, and I take questions from the crowd at LTU&E, covering a variety of topics. Check it out.

    Tags

  • 71

    Interview: Feb 15th, 2010

    Brandon Sanderson

    I've got the Photoshop contest winners below, but first the weekly updates. In the most recent Mistborn 3 annotations I discuss TenSoon's visit to Urteau and Vin attacking without using Allomancy.

    This past weekend was BYU's science fiction/fantasy symposium, Life, the Universe & Everything. This was my first convention as Guest of Honor (as well as my first con after the release of The Gathering Storm), and there was a huge crowd—including our largest crowd ever for an episode of Writing Excuses, several of which we recorded at the con. Up first—airing as this week's episode—James Dashner joined Dan, Howard, and me to discuss pacing. Check it out. I also did a couple of interviews during the convention; one with Provo's Daily Herald resulted in a video that they've put up on YouTube.

    My assistant also sent out a newsletter to everyone on my mailing list for the first time in almost four years. I've posted a copy here. Baby pictures included! The newsletter is mostly for the benefit of people who don't come to my site very often, but if you tell me what city you're in, I also send out reminders when I'm signing nearby. Consider putting your name on the list; anyone who sends me an email gets added.

    Tags

  • 72

    Interview: Feb 1st, 2010

    Brandon Sanderson

    Finally, in the most recent Mistborn 3 annotations, I have a discussion of Vin's interactions with Ruin while imprisoned and the first of a three-part annotation on Spook's climactic chapter.

    Tags

  • 73

    Interview: Apr 5th, 2010

    Brandon Sanderson

    Though there's a lot of ground to cover, this post is going to have to be quick due to my The Way of Kings deadline coming up on April 8th. First off, the latest Writing Excuses podcast covers juggling multiple viewpoints. And the most recent Mistborn 3 annotations talk about what the mistsickness is doing and more on Sazed's conversation with the First Generation.

    Tags

  • 74

    Interview: Mar 29th, 2010

    Brandon Sanderson

    In the most recent Mistborn 3 annotations, I talk about Sazed taking action and Marsh encountering Goradel. And in this week's Writing Excuses episode Dan, Howard, and I talk about writing an epic. You may imagine we have a bit of experience on this topic, so check it out.

    Tags

  • 75

    Interview: Mar 29th, 2010

    Brandon Sanderson

    I'm working on the final draft of The Way of Kings in order to meet its April 8th deadline, and over the past few days I've posted on Twitter and Facebook breakdowns of how many words I'm cutting from each chapter. This has confused some readers who have asked me not to cut anything out or to save them for an eventual "writer's cut" edition. Trust me on this one—the book you'll get on the shelf is the writer's cut, and you wouldn't like the writing as much if I didn't go through and do the trimming on this draft. Sort of like a director shoots a lot of film and then edits it into a coherent narrative later, I tend to overwrite on my first drafts—the language is more wordy than it needs to be, sometimes a character will come to the same realization multiple times as I'm working out where best to fit it in, that sort of thing. In my final draft I go in and trim out all the fat. We talked about this in an episode of Writing Excuses last year; if you're curious about the process, give it a listen.

    So the words I'm cutting in this draft aren't anything you're going to miss as a reader. Now, sometimes I will cut an entire scene or heavily rework a section, but that usually happens in earlier drafts than this. I do save the cut scenes in case they contain something I want to use somewhere else or just for posterity. In the Library section of the website I've included some deleted scenes from Elantris, Mistborn 1, and Mistborn 2—check those out if you want to understand why it's a good reason those scenes are gone. Long after The Way of Kings is out, some of its cut scenes or early draft sections may end up on that page. We'll see.

    Tags

  • 76

    Interview: Apr 14th, 2010

    Brandon Sanderson

    Speaking of audiobooks, over at Fantasy Literature they've posted reviews of both audio versions of Warbreaker. There are also reviews of my other titles on that page, and many other reviews throughout the site.

    In the most recent podcast episode of Writing Excuses, Dan, Howard, and I brainstorm story concepts using ideas from science. We started out by using a New Scientist article called "13 More Things We Don't Understand". Check it out.

    In the most recent Mistborn 3 annotations I talk about the beginning of Vin's climax and her fight with the Inquisitors, Marsh and the earring, and cinematic writing. We're getting close to the end . . . I guess I should start putting up the Warbreaker annotations soon.

    Finally, my good friend Janci Patterson just got her first fiction sale: her YA novel Skipped was bought by Christy Ottaviano at Henry Holt. I couldn't be more pleased for her; I gave her some comments on the book (I basically thought it was brilliant). Janci also gave me some comments on The Way of Kings that proved invaluable in writing the final draft; if you're following me on Twitter or Facebook you heard a little more about that. You may also recognize Janci from the Mistborn 3 chapter 30 annotations. Anyway, I assume Janci's book will be out in 2011 or 2012, after which you can all buy it and find out for yourself how great it is.

    Tags

  • 77

    Interview: May 3rd, 2010

    Peter Ahlstrom

    Brandon's assistant Peter here. He's hard at work on Towers of Midnight, which you know if you've been following on Twitter or Facebook. And I've been doing a lot of behind-the-scenes work for The Way of Kings release (the book is being composited as we speak and is due back from proofreading on Friday). So we're a bit behind on updates.

    The most recent Mistborn 3 annotations cover Allomantic secrets including atium Mistings and the kandra coup and Sazed's decision. I've got the next four annotations queued, which should tide you over until we've got the KINGS proofs approved and I can line up the rest.

    There are three new episodes of the writing advice podcast Brandon does with Howard Tayler and Dan Wells that haven't been mentioned on the blog. First up is a talk with Isaac Stewart, interior artist for the Mistborn books and one of the artists for The Way of Kings, about the visual elements of storytelling. Next up is breaking the fourth wall, again with Isaac (who is also half of the team behind the webcomic Rocket Road Trip with Warbreaker map artist Shawn Boyles). And finally is Living with the Artist which features Sandra Tayler, Dawn Wells, and Kenny Pike talking about what roles they play in their spouses' careers, among other things. (Kenny is a former student of Brandon's whose wife Aprilynne's book Wings hit #1 on the New York Times list. Who Sandra and Dawn are should be obvious.)

    Tags

  • 78

    Interview: Apr 28th, 2010

    Brandon Sanderson

    Brandon then went on to talk about his upcoming novel, The Way of Kings, which is book one of a projected ten in the Stormlight Archive. Brandon explained that, as one would expect, any writer that is developing while reading Jordan would have a grand epic of some sort in the back of his head. The Way of Kings is his. He wrote a first draft of it a while ago. It was a behemoth of a book, and he had initially tried to get it published right after Elantris. His editor was not so sure that would be something he could do, especially as it was a super-ambitious project. So they shelved it and he moved on to Mistborn. But it was still there, waiting.

    After The Gathering Storm was finished, two things happened. The first being that Brandon found he needed a break from The Wheel of Time to rejuvenate. The second was that Tom Doherty (the big boss of Tor) called him and said that they did not have a book from just Brandon Sanderson coming out this year and that he would like one. Brandon tried to protest, but Tom was persistent and said the six words one should probably never tell an author: "You can do whatever you want." So, Brandon rewrote The Way of Kings entirely, using his since-refined skills to tighten it up (some, it is still nearly a thousand pages), and even managed to get Tom to call in an old favor with Michael Whelan to do the cover art.

    Something to be warned of, though. Book Two of the Stormlight Archive is going to be a long time coming. Brandon is going to finish The Wheel of Time first before he goes back to that. He then intends to do two more Stormlight books, then some other single project, then two more, then a single, et cetera and so forth. So be ready for at least a small wait for a sequel to that.

    Tags

  • 79

    Interview: Jun 28th, 2010

    Brandon Sanderson

    The Mistborn 3 annotations are now all online, finishing with a wrap-up post on the whole series. Warbreaker annotations are now going up, starting with one on the book's dedication. If you're not sure about this whole annotation thing, I'll be posting an explanation soon.

    Tags

  • 80

    Interview: Sep 13th, 2010

    Patrick

    In Elantris and Mistborn it felt more like the world was there to support the story and characters, but outside the locales the characters were in little was revealed about them. The Way of Kings feels much more expansive, with a vast continent packed with different cultures, races, religions and so on. Was this simply a natural development of needing a world that could support ten long novels, or was there some other motive in making Roshar so much more detailed?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I'm going to reverse-engineer your question. When I wrote Elantris and Mistborn, I intentionally kept the world more sparse. The goal particularly of Mistborn was, "I'm going to take an epic fantasy story and condense it into three novels." The focus for me in those novels was plot. Of course I wanted to have great characters and great magic, but there was more of a plot focus, and I didn't want the world to distract. It was a conscious decision in Mistborn.

    When I sat down and wrote The Way of Kings, the plan from the start to do ten books influenced how I approached the world. But really, the world of Roshar is such a big part of the story, and of the history and the mysteries of the series, that I wanted it to be full and immersive. Immersion was one of my main driving forces. With Mistborn, one of my main driving forces was to keep it moving. I hope The Way of Kings still feels fast-paced, but it's a thousand pages long, twice as long as Mistborn. A lot of that extra space is dedicated to fleshing out the world and making it feel like a real place, because that's very important for the series. When I write a book, I look at what the book needs and what is required by the story I'm trying to achieve. Another valid element is that when I wrote Mistborn, I was a newer writer. Writing The Way of Kings, I'm more experienced. I think I'm better at making this sort of decision now, and I felt I could tackle in this book the sorts of things that I couldn't achieve in Mistborn.

    Tags

  • 81

    Interview: Sep 13th, 2010

    Patrick

    Over your previous books you've developed a reputation as the 'magic system guy'. Was it therefore a deliberate move to hold back on the magic in The Way of Kings, at least compared to your earlier books?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes, it was. That's a very astute question. I've written a blog post that I'm not satisfied with, but that I'll probably be revising and posting very soon, that is going to talk about this. When I finished the Mistborn trilogy and Warbreaker, I felt that there were a few things that were becoming Brandon clichés that I needed to deal with. I don't mind being known as the magic system guy. But when I become known ONLY as the magic system guy, that worries me. It isn't that I sat down with this series and said, well, I'm gonna show them, I'm not going to do a magic system. But when I planned this series, it was not appropriate for me to shoehorn in a lot of the magic system in book one. Though my agent suggested that I do just that. He said, look, this is what you're known for, this is what people read you for; if you don't have this it's going to be glaringly obvious. My response was that I would hope that story and character are what carries a book, not any sort of gimmick—well, gimmick is the wrong word.

    Something that I pondered and wrote about a lot—just to myself—is that Mistborn was postmodern fantasy. If you look at the trilogy, in each of those books I intentionally took one aspect of the hero's journey and played with it, turned it on its head, and tried very hard to look at it postmodernly, in which I as a writer was aware of the tropes of the genre while writing and expected readers to be aware of them, to be able to grasp the full fun of what I was doing. And that worried me—that was fun with Mistborn, but I didn't want to become known as the postmodern fantasy guy, because inherently you have to rely on the genre conventions in order to tell your story—even if you're not exploiting them in the same way, you're still exploiting them.

    For that reason, I didn't want to write The Way of Kings as a postmodern fantasy. Or in other words, I didn't want to change it into one. And I also didn't want to change it into a book that became only about the magic, or at least not to the extent that Warbreaker was. I like Warbreaker; I think it turned out wonderfully. But I wanted to use the magic in this book as an accent. Personally, I think it's still as full of magic as the others, but the magic is happening much more behind the scenes, such as with the spren I've talked about in other interviews, which are all about the magic. We haven't mentioned Shardplate and Shardblades, but those are a very powerful and important part of the magic system, and a more important part of the world. I did intentionally include Szeth's scenes doing what he does with the Lashings to show that there was this magic in the world, but it just wasn't right for this book for that to be the focus. I do wonder what people will say about that. I wonder if that will annoy people who read the book. But again, this is its own book, its own series, and in the end I decided that the book would be as the story demanded, not be what whatever a Brandon Sanderson book should be. As a writer, that's the sort of trap that I don't want to fall into.

    Tags

  • 82

    Interview: Oct 12th, 2010

    Brandon Sanderson

    PART TWO: BUFFERS AND MY WRITING SPEED

    Because of this, and because of my writing style, I need a little bit of a break before I tackle it. I pushed myself very hard to get both Towers of Midnight and The Way of Kings ready for publication this year. Even then, it was only possible because I had written a sizable chunk of Towers of Midnight while working on The Gathering Storm AND because I'd already finished an early version of The Way of Kings.

    People have mentioned before that I am somewhat prolific. Some of this is an illusion. For a while now, I've been warning people that we've been chewing through my buffer at a frightening rate. Once upon a time, I would turn in a book three years before it was scheduled to come out. This gave me a lot of wiggle room. If a book wasn't working, I could shelve it and think about it, then get back to it. Working that far ahead prevents most big crunches.

    However, the books I've been working on lately were a little more high profile than previous ones—and high-profile books get released when they get turned in, not three years later. So, though I took eighteen months finishing The Gathering Storm, it looked like I finished it very quickly. (I turned it in during the summer of 2009, and it came out in the fall of 2009. Warbreaker came out that same year, though I'd turned it in back in 2006.) The very long write of that book was invisible to a lot of readers because books I'd written years before continued to come out while I was working on it.

    The buffer is gone now. I'll talk more about that later. However, I want to mention something else that helps me be productive—and that's allowing myself deviations to keep myself interested. I've told people before that I wrote the Alcatraz books to give me a break between Mistborn novels. If I'm able to refresh myself on other projects, I don't get burned out on the big epics. (Which are my true love, but can be very demanding on me mentally.)

    Tags

  • 83

    Interview: Sep 12th, 2010

    Brandon Sanderson

    MY OWN WRITING

    I ran into this problem full-on when I first conceived the idea for Mistborn. For those who haven't read the series, one of the main premises is this: A young man followed the hero's cycle from a fantasy novel, but failed at the end. The thing that made me want to write it, originally, was the thought, "What if Rand lost the Last Battle? What if Frodo had failed to destroy the ring? What if the Dark Lord won?"

    A very intriguing thought. And yet, I realized early on that if I wrote the book as I was planning, I would fail. That story undermines itself. Perhaps there is someone out there who can write it in a way that engages the reader without betraying them at the end, but that person was not me. By the point I started that book, I was in the camp of those who (despite having a great love for the fantasy epics of the past) wanted to explore where fantasy could go, not where it had already been. I wasn't interested in writing a standard hero's journey. Jordan had done that already, and had done it well.

    And so, I set Mistborn a thousand years after the hero's failure. I made my original concept into the backstory. People have asked (a surprisingly large number of them) when I'll write the prequel story, the story of Rashek and Alendi. My answer is to smile, shake my head, and say, "I don't think it's likely." To explain why would require a lecture divided into three lengthy parts, and you know how boring that kind of thing can be.

    Now, some of you may be thinking the obvious thought: "But Brandon, Mistborn is a postmodern fantasy epic."

    Indeed it is. I was intrigued by the concept of writing a postmodern fantasy, and that's what Mistborn is. In each book, I consciously took aspects of the fantasy epic and twisted them about. My story above wasn't to discourage that type of writing; it was to explain one major way that it could go bad, if you're not careful.

    I tried to walk a line in Mistborn. Enough archetype that I could resonate with the themes from fantasy that I wanted to play with, but enough originality to keep the readers from expecting a standard ending. It's the type of balance that I can never walk perfectly because there is just too much variety to be had in the world. Some people are going to read the books and feel betrayed because of the things I pull; others are going to find that they're not original enough for their taste.

    The success of the books was in hitting the right balance for the right people; those like myself who love the old epics, and like some resonance with them—but who also want something new in their storytelling. That careful blend of the familiar and the strange, mixed up and served to people who have tastes like my own. That's basically one of the only measures we authors can use. (And note, I'm not the only one—by a long shot—doing postmodern fantasy. Look to Jacqueline Carey's series The Sundering for another example of someone doing the right blend, I feel, in a postmodern fantasy epic.)

    Tags

  • 84

    Interview: Sep 12th, 2010

    Brandon Sanderson

    THE WAY OF KINGS

    The Mistborn books were successful. Many readers liked the idea of a world where the Dark Lord won, where prophecy and the hero were not what we expected them to be.

    Because of how well it worked, however, I fell into something of a trap. When it came time to rewrite The Way of Kings, I floundered. I knew the story I wanted to tell, but I felt I needed to insert a major twist on the fantasy genre, along the lines of what I'd done in Mistborn. What would be my twist? What would be the postmodern aspect of this book? It literally kept me up nights. (Not hard to do, since I'm an insomniac, but still.)

    Over time, I wrestled with this because a larger piece of me resisted doing the postmodern thing in Mistborn again. That piece of me began to ask some difficult questions. Did I want to be known as "The guy who writes postmodern fantasies"? There would be worse monikers to have. However, one of the major purposes of deconstructionism, is to point out the problem with self-referential material. There was a gimmick to the Mistborn books. It was a very useful one, since it allowed me to pitch the book in one sentence. "The hero failed; this is a thousand years later."

    There are a lot of very good postmodern stories out there, and I love the Mistborn books. But my heart wasn't in doing that again. In order to write Mistborn the way I did, I also had to rely on the archetypes. My characters, for example, were very archetypal: The street urchin. The clever rogue who robs to do good. The idealistic young nobleman who wants to change the world. My plots were very archetypal as well: a heist story for the first book, a siege narrative for the second. I believe that a good book can use archetypes in new ways without being clichéd. (The Name of the Wind is an excellent example.)

    In fact, it's probably impossible not to reflect archetypes in storytelling. I'm sure they're there in The Way of Kings. But I found in working on it that I didn't want to intentionally build a story where I relied upon reader expectations. Instead, I wanted to look for themes and character concepts that I haven't approached before, and that I haven't seen approached as often in the genre.

    There's a distinction to be found. It's much like the difference in humor between parody and satire. (As I define them.) In the first, you are funny only if your audience understands what you are parodying. In the second, you are funny because you are innately funny. Early Pratchett is parody. Mid and late Pratchett is satire. (Not to mention brilliant.)

    And this is why, in the end, I decided that I would not write The Way of Kings as a postmodern epic. (Not intentionally, at least.) Mistborn felt, in part, like a reflection. There were many original parts, but at its core it was a study of the genre, and—to succeed at its fullest—it needed an audience who understood the tropes I was twisting about. Instead of making its own lasting impression and improvement on the genre, it rested upon the work done by others.

    In short, I feel that using that same process again would make it a crutch to me. There is nothing at all wrong with what Mistborn did. I'm very proud of it, and I think it took some important steps. But it's not what I want to be known for, not solely. I don't just want to reflect and study; I want to create. I want to write something that says, "Here is my addition, my tiny step forward, in the genre that I love."

    To couch it in the terms of the Jewel video that started the essay, instead of creating a piece of art that screams, "Hey, look at those other pieces of art and hear my take on them," I wanted to create something that says, "Look at this piece of art. This is what I think art should be in this genre now." Part of me thinks that a video that was beautiful for its own sake, that didn't rely upon the follies of others, would do more toward undermining those follies than would a video that pointed them all out.

    And so, I tossed aside my desire to confine The Way of Kings into a single, pithy sentence explaining the slant I was taking on the fantasy genre. I just wrote it as what it was.

    Tags

  • 85

    Interview: Nov 14th, 2008

    Brandon Sanderson

    He spoke about magic system creation and that he had a science background that inspired him in creating Allomancy which has a scientific basis, and elements of chemistry, biology and physics. He also mentioned a podcast he is a part of, Writing Excuses, and that one episode was about creating magic systems.

    Tags

  • 86

    Interview: Nov 14th, 2008

    Question

    How much pre-writing do you do for each book?

    Brandon Sanderson

    He wrote 50k words backstory for Mistborn, and 200k words backstory for The Way of Kings. It takes about 8 months to write a novel. Though it only took a month to write Alcatraz, which was a parody of conspiracies, and included bad super-powers, an anti-epic fantasy (and that a possible movie from Dreamworks was in the works at the time).

    Tags

  • 87

    Interview: Nov 14th, 2008

    Brandon Sanderson

    He wrote three drafts of [The Final Empire], two rough and one polished. He may do another book in the Mistborn world, but it would be in the far future as opposed to being a sequel, and the world may actually progress scientifically.

    Tags

  • 88

    Interview: Nov 14th, 2008

    Brandon Sanderson

    On Allomancy, he said that tin and pewter are opposites in a sense, that they strengthen different aspects of the body, and that there will be a published poster to explain some apparent inconsistencies among the last four metals.

    Tags

  • 89

    Interview: Nov 4th, 2010

    Question

    Have you finished the Mistborn novella?

    Brandon Sanderson

    The Mistborn short story, that became a novella that became a short novel is 60,000 words long and is really looking like 70,000 words, which is about a third the length of one of my other novels. It's slow going while I'm on tour, but it will be done fairly soon.

    Chris Treco

    He had a few other details about this, but I'll let you watch the recording for the specifics. Also, read Mistborn if you haven't yet!

    Brandon Sanderson

    If you weren't aware, between books, I generally take a few months off and just write something random, whatever strikes me. I can't have a contract for it. It has to be something completely unexpected to keep instincts sharp and my writing ability sharp. I'm starting on A Memory of Light on January 1, but I've got these three months to do whatever occurs to me. Two months ago, I wrote a story about a pizza delivery man who turns into a necromancer. It was called "Death by Pizza". (lots of laughter; although I hope he publishes this!) He was a good pizza delivery man, with good pizza, he was just a necromancer.

    Tags

  • 90

    Interview: Nov 8th, 2010

    Question

    Which kind of Misting would you want to be?

    Brandon Sanderson

    A Coinshot so I could jump around.

    Tags

  • 91

    Interview: Nov 8th, 2010

    Question

    Will there be an overlying plot for the future of Mistborn?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes, but it may not be immediately obvious.

    Tags

  • 92

    Interview: Nov 10th, 2010

    Question

    Mistborn got the Elbakin.net award for the best 2010 foreign novel. What does this trilogy represent for you in your career?

    Brandon Sanderson

    It represents several things. It is my attempt to expand the fantasy genre a little bit. I grew up reading fantasy and loving it; I love the great fantasy novels of my youth. Some of my favorite authors were Anne McCaffrey, Robert Jordan and Melanie Rawn, who I think is very underappreciated. I absolutely love their work—Tad Williams, David Eddings—and yet as a reader and a fan of fantasy, it seemed like during the late nineties and early 2000s, we hit kind of a slump in adult fantasy, particularly epic fantasy, which I write. And there were really exciting things happening in young adult fantasy—if you go look at some of the authors like Garth Nix or J.K. Rowling, who were doing really amazing work—but epic fantasy kind of slumped a little bit. I'm sure there were great things being published, it's just that they didn't get a lot of mainstream attention. It seemed like a lot of the authors who got mainstream attention were all trying to do the same story that had already been done, a lot. The young boy from an unknown village finds out he has an amazing noble heritage and has to defeat the dark lord...

    I mean, there's nothing wrong with that story; that's a good story, but it's not the only story. And for a lot of time, fantasy seemed to be having trouble growing out of its youth and growing up. As a reader I was very frustrated with this. I really wanted fantasy to step up and go beyond that. So when I started writing my own works and working on them, I was really looking for places to explore, that could expand upon this lore and take different directions. Mistborn represents several concepts of me, just as a reader and as a writer, trying to explore these new directions to go. I'm certainly not the only one doing it.

    The first book is about: what happens if evil has won? And in a lot of ways the second book is part of what started me in the trilogy. One of the big foundations or concepts was: what next? We always hear about the easy part. I always say that overthrowing something, tearing something down, actually seems easier to me than building it up. Then what next, after you've caused this great revolution, after you've blown up the Death Star and taken down the Empire? I think then you're going to realize that, whoa, administering something that large is enormously difficult, far more difficult than tearing it down.

    So it just represents my attempts and struggles as a writer and as a fan to wonder beyond fantasy's older lessons and try to figure out what we're going to be as an adult genre, as we grow up.

    Tags

  • 93

    Interview: Nov 10th, 2010

    Question

    In a general way, does your religion have an influence on your work?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I think that it does, and yet it's not a direct influence; it's more of an indirect influence. I'm practicing LDS, Mormon, for those who don't know. It shapes who I am, and who I am helps shape my fiction. There's been a long-running sort of argument, so to speak—a nice argument—in fantasy, about how much of it is allegorical and how much of it isn't. If you look back to Grandpa Tolkien and C.S. Lewis, you can see from C.S. Lewis' work he was very allegorical, whereas Tolkien was not. Tolkien was doing story and letting theme grow, and I actually prefer his way of writing. I feel that as wonderful as C.S. Lewis was, when you specifically embed messages, then the story becomes about a message, and not about the characters.

    And so I don't go into my work saying: "I want to prove X, Y or Z", I actually go into my work with the opposite opinion. I really believe that one of the great things fiction can do is that it can explore ideas from lots of different viewpoints. And I think because I'm a religious person, religious ideas and conflicts are fascinating to me. But I like to explore these things from different sides, and people who believe in different ways, and I like to make all of their arguments equally sound and equally powerful, because that way when you read the book, you get to see an exploration of a topic, rather than someone taking an answer and shoving it at you, over and over again. It offends me when I read fiction and someone expresses my viewpoint, but they do it poorly. I'd rather they just not have my viewpoint at all than do it poorly.

    So I think my religion affects me to be fascinated in these concepts, so religious concepts are in my books. I like to hope that I'm approaching them from lots of different and interesting aspects, but the nature of faith, the nature of hope, the nature of rational thought versus faithful thought: these different things are very fascinating to me, and so they tend to be fascinating to my characters.

    Question

    It makes me think about your character Sazed in Mistborn, who's fascinated by religions...

    Brandon Sanderson

    Oh yes, there's definitely connection between him and my own kind of feelings about religion and explorations of religion and things like this. He was a character very much out of my heart; people ask who I'm most like and it might be him. I don't know, it's hard to say. I'm not much like Kelsier: he is too gregarious, he is not me, but there's a little bit of me in all of them I suppose.

    Tags

  • 94

    Interview: Jan 6th, 2011

    Brandon Sanderson

    The second thing I tried writing was a short story set in the Mistborn world a few hundred years after The Hero of Ages. This one just didn't work; the characters weren't gripping for me. More importantly, it just didn't FEEL like a Mistborn book. I got about one scene into it.

    As I was working on it, however, I did some worldbuilding on this time period in Scadrial's history. I got to thinking about what was wrong with the short story, and why it didn't feel right. This grew into an outline regarding a completely different story—with no overlap of characters—set in the same time period. I nurtured this and started writing, and it felt right from the get-go. I had the right tone, so I kept writing, expanding my outline, letting the story grow as big as it wanted to be.

    In the end, I had an 85,000-word novel that I named Mistborn: The Alloy of Law. I'm very excited about the story, and I offered it to Tor for publication with one condition: They had to put it out in 2011. I've mentioned before that I worried I wasn't going to have a book release for you in 2011, what with the extra time A Memory of Light is going to take. Alloy of Law turned out so well that I wanted to share it with everyone, and use it to fill in the gap between Towers of Midnight and A Memory of Light.

    You may have seen the Tor announcement on this book. It should come out this fall; I'd guess September or October. I want to reassure people that I didn't do this instead of writing the next Stormlight book. This time period between big books had to be used to write something shorter, something more self-contained. I just couldn't have done a Stormlight book. It was this novel or nothing. I'm pleased that Alloy of Law turned out so well.

    Tags

  • 95

    Interview: Jan 10th, 2011

    Maru Nui ()

    What does aluminum do in Feruchemy? What does malatium do in Hemalurgy?

    Brandon Sanderson ()

    RAFO. We'll be releasing a chart eventually that includes all of the powers. I don't want to speak until I have everything nailed down exactly the way I want.


    Tags

  • 96

    Interview: Jan 10th, 2011

    Maru Nui ()

    What would an atium-electrum alloy do in Allomancy?

    Brandon Sanderson ()

    The alloys of atium have various temporal effects.


    Tags

  • 97

    Interview: Jan 10th, 2011

    Maru Nui ()

    What happens when you burn a Hemalurgic spike?

    Brandon Sanderson ()

    Burning a Hemalurgic spike would have the effect of splicing your spiritual DNA to that of the person's that is in the spike, which would have some very strange consequences.


    Tags

  • 98

    Interview: Jan 10th, 2011

    Maru Nui ()

    Can you both Feruchemically charge and Hemalurgically invest in the same piece of metal?

    Brandon Sanderson ()

    
Yes.

    Maru Nui

    What would happen if you burned the Feruchemically charged and Hemalurgically invested metal?

    Brandon Sanderson

    RAFO.

    Tags

  • 99

    Interview: Jan 10th, 2011

    Maru Nui ()

    What happens when you break a Hemalurgic spike or metalmind? What happens to that power?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Hemalurgic power can be split among multiple spikes and reforged, but remember that the longer a spike is outside of a person, the more the power is going to decay. Things like splitting it will decay it even further. Metalminds can also be broken and still be accessed.

    Footnote

    Tags

  • 100

    Interview: Jan 10th, 2011

    Goron ()

    You've mentioned before that all your books so far are in chronological order (Elantris, the Mistborn trilogy, Warbreaker, Stormlight Archive). Alloy of Law takes place about 200 years after The Hero of Ages. (Right?) Does this put it chronologically before or after Warbreaker?

    Brandon Sanderson ()

    The Alloy of Law takes place around 300 years after The Hero of Ages and several hundred years before the events in The Way of Kings. That does put it around the same time as Warbreaker.

    Footnote

    This was recently changed when Brandon realized a timeline conflict. Way of Kings is now in between Hero of Ages and Alloy of Law.

    Alloy of Law Reddit Q&A

    Tags

  • 101

    Interview: Jan 10th, 2011

    Eric Lake ()

    Here's a quote. "Why, the Astalsi were rather advanced—they mixed religion with science quite profoundly. They thought that different colors were indications of different kinds of fortune, and they were quite detailed in their descriptions of light and color. Why, it's from them that we get some of our best ideas as to what things might have looked like before the Ascension. They had a scale of colors, and use it to describe the sky of the deepest blue and various plants in their shades of green." Do the pre-Ascension religions correspond to religions from other Shardworlds, as this one seems somewhat like Nalthis?

    Brandon Sanderson ()

    I mention this in one of the Well of Ascension annotations.

    After I came up with the idea and had Sazed mention it, my desire to explore it more was one of the initial motivations for Warbreaker's setting.

    The answer to your question is yes and no. There are shadows.

    Tags

  • 102

    Interview: Feb 28th, 2011

    Phaz ()

    In your gut instinct, who would win in a fight, Marsh (no atium, limited feruchemy) or Szeth? (Or maybe we could go Zane & Szeth since I see a lot of similarities in their characters. They also happen to be my favorites from their respective series)

    One of the interesting things I really liked about the book was Jasnah's lack of faith. It seems like during a lot of the scenes where that is an issue, you give her the upper hand. She makes some argument or point and the other characters leave it unchallenged. For instance the line where she says something like "Religion looks for super natural explanations to natural phenomena, science looks for natural explanations to super natural phenomena." That side of her seemed incredibly well written and genuine. Was it hard to do? Where did you get her arguments/points from? I swear a lot of what she says could of been ripped from comments of /r/atheism.

    Lastly, I've been rereading the Mistborn series again after reading The Way of Kings twice in a row so I could decide which I liked more. So far...it's still a tie. I'm really liking getting back into the Mistborn world though. That has me super excited for Alloy of Law. Once it get's a bit more polished would it be possible to get an early copy? :)

    Brandon Sanderson

    First question: It's always hard to answer these questions, since there are so many factors. Do the combatants start at a distance? If so, Marsh/Zane have a huge advantage; they have the ability to fling coins.

    Does Szeth have metal on him? Szeth's Shardblade would be mostly immune to Pushing and Pulling, as it's an Invested object. But he'd still have trouble getting to them if he had a clasp on his shoes, for example. He doesn't carry a lot of metal, but he might have some.

    Overall, I'd say that a full-blown Mistborn would be tougher than Szeth in most cases.

    Also, send me a PM with your Email, Phaz. I can't find your email in my address book. I remember that it's not something I expect it to be, so I'm having trouble looking it up.

    Tags

  • 103

    Interview: Feb 28th, 2011

    nowonmai666 ()

    Hi! Two sort-of related questions here, about the writing process:

    What would you do differently if you were writing the books to be released all at pretty much the same time (like Lord of The Rings) rather than as episodic updates? Would you still go into the same level of detail in describing relatively trivial events such as the affixing of contraband from the Chasms to the underside of permanent bridges?

    I'll probably finish up the book later today, and if/when I write the review it will be a mixture of fulsome praise and F7U12-level frustration. The latter is largely because you set up so many questions—hints about characters' backgrounds, secrets about the world, its people and its magic, riddles wrapped in mysteries inside enigmas. After 1007 pages I feel I deserve more answers! I imagine you planting the seeds of mysteries and thinking "haha, I'll make 'em suffer 8 years before they get the answer to that one!". The question here is how do you balance (1) providing enough information to make the world and characters seem consistent, real and immersive with (2) withholding information for revelation later in the series? Do you consciously think about building up trust in the reader that the questions they have will one day be answered, or worry that the reader might think everything is so mysterious it will probably end up in a nonsensical betrayal like so many scifi films and tv series?

    Brandon Sanderson

    This is a very interesting question.

    I actually wrote the Mistborn trilogy straight through before releasing the first, so I have some experience doing it both ways now. With Kings, I'm much more careful with my foreshadowing. Maybe to the point of teasing. That's a contrast to Mistborn, where I may have been too blunt with my foreshadowing. (Or just not put it in.)

    The trilogy there was one book in my mind, so things that happened at the end of the first book that should have been better foreshadowed didn't get the foreshadowing they deserve—because I was looking at them as elements I was introducing 1/3 the way through the story, and thinking of them as being on a proper curve of information.

    The balance of what to provide and what to withhold has more to do with not bogging down this story with details for a future story than it does with trying to tease. In my mind, this book is three things: Kaladin's experiences as a bridgeman 2) Dalinar's decision to do what he does at the end of the book 3) Shallan's first apprenticeship. I wanted to keep the narrative focused on those things, and provide climaxes dealing with those three concepts. Other secrets and teases are more intended to begin setting up future stories.

    However, the "Lost" effect (making the mysteries so cool that no reveal can live up to them) is in the forefront of my mind. My feeling is that instead of dragging them eight books, I should be quick to give answers in future volumes. The things that span eight books as secrets shouldn't be the ones that you're wondering at in the first book; they should be the things that, after you begin wondering about them in the seventh book, you can look back to the first book and see the hints. Then you get your answers in the eighth.

    Tags

  • 104

    Interview: Apr 16th, 2011

    Question

    This is for Brandon. You're one of the most ambitious authors I've read. You're working on finishing up the Wheel of Time series and your own ten-book epic, not to mention another Mistborn trilogy. How do you deal with writing that much book?

    Brandon Sanderson

    That's a good question. Every writer has their own process, and understanding my process may help you understand how I work. I kind of have different levels of projects in my head. I have the big epics, the big super epics that I work on for a long time and take a lot of brain space, but also take a lot of digestion. They don't just pop out. They take years to get right. Gathering Storm took about 18 months to do. It didn't seem that way because I was ahead on some of my other projects, but that's what it took. And Way of Kings, you know, I finished the first draft in 2002. You got something like the 15th or 16th draft in 2010. And so these books take a lot of brain space, but just take time. It's hard to work on multiples of that at the same time. Doing the first Stormlight book was possible because I had finished the first draft in 2002. It is not possible for me to do the second one while working on another big epic. I can only really do one book of that scope at a time, which is why you aren't going to be seeing Stormlight 2 until Wheel of Time is done, just because I can't physically and mentally do that.

    But I have different projects that work on different sort of brain space levels. I need to take breaks from the big epics some time, to just do something different and refresh myself. And I've talked about this on my blog; it's how I work. And usually these are quick projects that I give myself a few weeks or a month to work on in between big epics. My children's books, the Alcatraz books, were these during the Mistborn triology stage. I would stop and I would write one of these to really just cleanse the palate, to do something different. And I usually don't do a lot of outlining for these books. I write them off the cuff. I've talked about the difference between architect writers and gardener writers. Gardeners kind of just start with something and see where it goes. Neil Gaiman describes it as jumping out of an airplane with a ball of yarn and trying to knit a parachute by the time you hit. Robert Jordan was more of a gardener writer in all of his books, from what I've been able to determine. I usually architect, which means I plan extensively, but I do gardener books in between. Then I just see where it goes, and some of the times these books turn out horrible, and so I don't do anything with them, and sometimes they turn out great. But it doesn't really matter to me if they turn out great or horrible, because the purpose of them is to refresh myself so that I can then get back to the big epic.

    And so when you see these side projects coming out, it's when one of these turns out really well and I decide to publish it. For instance, the new Mistborn book. The new Mistborn book is not part of the Mistborn epic. The new Mistborn book is a side project where I said, well you know, I'm not going to be able to return to this world for the next . . . I'm doing three trilogies of Mistborn books eventually. I've done one, I'll do a second, this book that's coming out is not one of those. This is a side project, kind of a short tale. It's more of a New Spring type thing, something where I'm like this is a cool story I want to tell. And I wrote it, and I still hope it's fun and exciting and people love it. But the purpose of this book, it's really a single narrative, one plot line. It has a couple viewpoint characters, but they're all together doing the same thing. And it's kind of a mystery set in an industrial age in Mistborn, the Mistborn world during the industrial age. This is the sort of thing that I can take one month off and write. I can't take one month off and write another Stormlight book. So, what you're looking at, how do I balance all these things? Well, what you're seeing is, you're seeing my vacation time. When I take a vacation for a few months, I work on something completely different to change, just to shake it up. And sometimes those turn out well and those get published, and so it looks like I'm producing differently than I am. Really, all these books are my babies, I love them, I hope that you all like them, but some are the big epics and some are the side projects. The Mistborn 4 book is a side project.

    Tags

  • 105

    Interview: May 30th, 2011

    Brandon Sanderson

    He talked about the link between his magic systems. One of the core principles is 'investing'. In a lot of his systems people are through some mechanism invested with magic powers. In Elantris through the Shaod, In Mistborn it's genetic, in The Way of Kings it depends on what someone has done.

    Tags

  • 106

    Interview: May 30th, 2011

    Brandon Sanderson

    Some movie company has got an option on the Mistborn books.

    Tags

  • 107

    Interview: May 30th, 2011

    Brandon Sanderson

    The Mistborn series was sold as three trilogies. The first trilogy (the one we know) is set in medieval/16th century technology and is fantasy. The second trilogy will be set in the current day, or at least with the same kind of technology. This makes it urban fantasy. The last trilogy will be science fiction set somewhere in the future. Of course, all of them have the Allomancy magic system to get things interesting. The short novel The Alloy of Law that will be released in the fall this year is set between the first two trilogies so the tech level is around 18th/19th century with steam power. Brandon said it was about some Wild West-like character getting involved in a murder investigation in a city. So Clint Eastwood meets Sherlock Holmes in London.

    Tags

  • 108

    Interview: Jun 4th, 2011

    Brandon Sanderson

    Sanderson has sold the film rights for the Mistborn trilogy. I believe this is common knowledge. What I believe is not common knowledge is that Sanderson has read the screenplay and is extremely pleased with it. All that is needed is a studio... Also, the series should appear as three films.

    Tags

  • 109

    Interview: Aug 1st, 2011

    SciFi Bulgaria

    What inspired you to become an author and what is your muse?

    Brandon Sanderson

    In the eighth grade, I had an English teacher who pointed me toward Dragonsbane by Barbara Hambly. That book changed my life. When I first read it, I was amazed—I had no idea books like that existed. It engaged my imagination like no other book ever had, and it even helped me understand my own mother better, because the main character's conflicts gave me a perspective on what my mother went through when she chose to focus on her family rather than her career. The book was creative, it was fun, yet it helped me understand life. At that point I started reading every fantasy book I could get my hands on, including Robert Jordan's first Wheel of Time book, The Eye of the World, when it came out in paperback. I was hooked, and as I read more and more books, my grades went up in school—I went from a low-end average student to someone who got top grades.

    It didn't take reading many fantasy books before I decided writing them was what I wanted to do with my life. I started my first book when I was fifteen. It was horrible, but I just kept writing and writing until I actually got any good.

    My ideas come from many different places, and all of my books combine ideas I came up with at different times. For example, I once ran into a fog bank while driving, and thought how it would be interesting to have a book set in a world of constant mist. But Mistborn didn't come together until at a different time I thought about a metal-based magic system, and another time was considering how I'd like to see a heist movie like Ocean's Eleven done as a fantasy novel. I also picture cinematic images like a Mistborn flying through the mist with mistcloak tassels fluttering in the air. Eventually these ideas bouncing around in my head coalesce into interesting combinations, and I start writing.

    Tags

  • 110

    Interview: Aug 1st, 2011

    SciFi Bulgaria

    Having in mind the success of the Mistborn series, can we expect another book with the same characters or in the same world?

    Brandon Sanderson

    The story of Vin and Elend is complete, and I'm very happy with what I was able to do in the end of The Hero of Ages. But the Mistborn world still has many tales to offer. There's a new Mistborn book, The Alloy of Law, coming out in November, that follows events three hundred years after the original trilogy. It's a bit different, but I hope readers enjoy it.

    Tags

  • 111

    Interview: Aug 1st, 2011

    SciFi Bulgaria

    Is there a motion picture or TV series in the works based on one of your books/series and if not are you open to the idea of making one?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I think excellent movies or TV series could be made from many of my ideas. Dreamworks Animation optioned my Alcatraz Versus the Evil Librarians books a couple of years ago, but they eventually decided the project wasn't right for animation. Mistborn has been optioned by Paloppa Pictures, and there are several other properties of mine currently being looked at by Hollywood. I don't know if an adaptation will ever eventually reach the screen, but I would welcome the opportunity for my stories to reach a wider audience.

    Tags

  • 112

    Interview: Aug 29th, 2011

    Literatopia

    The focus of the Mistborn trilogy and of Warbreaker is on lived faith and various deities. What do these topics mean to you and why did you choose to deal with them?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I'm very interested in the concepts of religion and the ideas that surround it, and I often find myself writing books that deal with things I'm interested in myself. I allow the themes of books like these to grow naturally out of the world I've built and out of the stories that I want to tell. Specifically, I kind of let the characters decide what the themes of a book are going to be. I don't go into it saying, "I'm going to write about this," but the worlds that I create betray my own interests very strongly. What is it about faith and deity? This is something that is unique about us as human beings, something very interesting to me, and it felt like this area was an open space to explore in fantasy in ways that hadn't been done before. I always find myself gravitating toward things that I feel haven't been explored as much as they could have been. That interests me and fascinates me.

    Tags

  • 113

    Interview: Aug 29th, 2011

    Literatopia

    Your stories are often promoted as being unique and unprecedented. What do you think about propositions like that? Have you ever been afraid of being unable to meet the market's expectations concerning your writing?

    Brandon Sanderson

    In my writing I try to combine the unfamiliar with the familiar. If something is too unique and unprecedented, then readers won't have anything to relate to and will just be lost.

    But if something is too familiar, it will feel stale and cliche. I like to look for twists on familiar tropes that haven't been extensively covered before. This often comes when I read other books in the field and think of a different way something could go. That's not to say other authors aren't doing the same thing, but I like to tackle takes that I haven't seen before. Trying to do what the market expects of you is a bit of a trap in the publishing field. You want your books to be things that people want to write, but if you try to write to the market you usually end up with something too familiar and boring. Back when I was writing those thirteen books I was sending the good examples out to editors and agents and getting a lot of rejection letters. (Elantris was the first book I wrote that I felt was good enough to send out, and I also sent out a couple I wrote after it.) After being told time and time again that my books were too long (Elantris in manuscript form was 250,000 words), I decided to try to do what I thought the market wanted and write books that were a lot shorter. But I discovered that the books I turned out in that format just weren't any good; they contained some very interesting ideas but were lacking in many areas.

    When Moshe bought Elantris and wanted to follow it up with another novel, I first offered him The Way of Kings but we realized that it was too ambitious a project at that point in time. So instead I took concepts from three of those failed novels and rewrote them into the first Mistborn book, writing it at the length my natural style seemed to work best at. And Mistborn was a huge success.

    You shouldn't assume that when you've read one Brandon Sanderson novel, you know what the next one is going to be like. From one series to the next I like to try different things. I know that some readers who really liked Mistborn are not going to like The Way of Kings; Mistborn had a narrower scope and faster pace than a huge epic like The Way of Kings has, and if a reader prefers that sort of book that is perfectly okay with me. I am going to write some books that are fast-paced and others that are huge epics. I like to change things up.

    Tags

  • 114

    Interview: Aug 29th, 2011

    Literatopia

    Your Mistborn trilogy is over 2800 pages total. Where did the idea for such a complex story come from? Did something specifically inspire you? How did you manage to hang in there for so long? Were there times when you thought, "I'm exhausted, I just can't go on"?

    Brandon Sanderson

    There was no one specific inspiration; it was a combination of different ideas bouncing around in my head for years and other ideas that I tried in earlier books that didn't work out. One idea does not make a book or a series, but ideas in interesting combinations makes a book. With Mistborn, one idea came while I was driving one day and entered a heavy fog bank: this started me thinking about a world shrouded in mist. Later I started thinking that a heist plot such as in movies like Ocean's Eleven would make a good fantasy story. I started thinking about different kinds of metal being used as magical batteries for different types of power. And I had a cinematic image of someone leaping through the air in a mistcloak. All these things combined to make a book.

    I wrote all three Mistborn books before the first one was released, so I was able to go back and alter things in the first book to keep everything consistent with the last book. And it was indeed exhausting. I've found that from time to time in order to recharge my mental batteries, I need to take a break and write something else instead. So after writing The Well of Ascension and before starting to write The Hero of Ages, I took some time off from the series and wrote a fun experimental project instead. I didn't really know where it was going or what I would ever do with it, but it turned into the first Alcatraz Versus the Evil Librarians book, which was completely different from the Mistborn books that had been occupying my life for months. I found that when I was finished writing that side project, my mind was refreshed and I was ready to tackle the Mistborn world again. So ever since then I've made it a habit to take breaks to write experimental short projects that don't necessarily have to go anywhere. Sometimes they work out, and sometimes they don't and I shelve them. But it keeps me fresh.

    Tags

  • 115

    Interview: Aug 29th, 2011

    Literatopia

    How would you describe the Mistborn trilogy to readers who haven't read anything about Vin and Elend yet? Do you think there is some specific detail that makes these novels what they are?

    Brandon Sanderson

    The basic concept is, "What happens after the hero fails?" If you've read fantasy books before, you know the story—a young peasant rises from obscurity with a faithful band of companions to challenge a great evil. In those stories, the hero always wins. But the world of Mistborn takes place a thousand years after the hero was defeated. The Lord Ruler is an immortal who has proven time and time again he cannot be killed and who rules the world with an iron fist. Instead of trying to kill him, a group of downtrodden thieves plan to battle his empire by stealing enough money to bribe his soldiers away from him. That's how the story begins.

    Tags

  • 116

    Interview: Aug 29th, 2011

    Literatopia

    What can we expect from you in the near (and far) future? Do you have any specific plans or are you still waiting to be inspired for further work?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I've always got things in the works, but to announce them this is probably not the forum or the time to announce them. People can watch my website. I'm very excited that the new Mistborn book, The Alloy of Law, is coming out in November. And of course I'm working on the last book of the Wheel of Time, which will be released sometime in 2012. Beyond that? I'm pretty busy with the things that I've put on my plate, so perhaps I will stay away from teasing people with things that are years and years off.

    Tags

  • 117

    Interview: Aug 29th, 2011

    Reader's Question

    Warbreaker features a wonderful system of magic. How did you come up with it? And will you tell us your favorite color?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Maroon.

    In The Well of Ascension I had to come up with a bunch of different religions for Sazed to study. One he mentions in chapter fifty revolves around color. It was such a fascinating idea that I decided to weave it into Warbreaker. The Awakening system uses color as both a cost and a benefit; using Breath drains color, and holding Breath increases perception of color. Awakening itself grew out of a common concept in tribal and shamanistic magic.

    Tags

  • 118

    Interview: Aug 21st, 2011

    Brandon Sanderson

    Sanderson wants fantasy, particularly epic fantasy, to feel more alien. He is trying to achieve this while still using human characters because he doesn't think he writes aliens well.

    He also thinks that technology in fantasy series is too static and his series is a reaction against that. Magic should change the world. There will be a sci-fi series set in the Mistborn world.

    Tags

  • 119

    Interview: Sep, 2011

    Leigh Butler

    Tell me a little bit about the new Mistborn book, Alloy of Law [coming out in November 2011]. It seems like the story arc of the original Mistborn trilogy (The Final Empire, The Well of Ascension, and The Hero of Ages) was well resolved by the end of the third book. So in what direction does this new one go, if you can say without spoilers?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Well, one of the things that bothers me about a lot of fantasy is that the worlds are strangely static, like we invent all sorts of contrived circumstances to keep them from progressing naturally, because we want stories of a certain type. What we do in fantasy, this kind of idealized time period, in literary terms we call it uchronia. Which in some ways is fun, but it's not very realistic.

    I envisioned a series in which there was real progress. There are books that have done it; the Wheel of Time did it, for example, with the introduction of steam power [into a medieval/Renaissance setting], but I wanted to do a story where I wrote a trilogy which explored a fantasy world, and then do other books years later where that fantasy world has now progressed, and its technology has progressed, so that it's now almost more of an urban fantasy world. You know, write urban fantasies in a setting where the mythology and history are things you saw take place in the first part of the series.

    Leigh Butler

    So you see not just the life of the characters, but the life of their entire world?

    Brandon Sanderson

    This really interested me, because I'd just never seen it done quite the way I wanted to do it. And that's often where my books come from—I find a place where the genre maybe hasn't been explored fully, and I get really excited. And so I pitched my editor a series where the first trilogy is an epic fantasy series, and then years later an urban fantasy series, and then years after that a science fiction series, all set in the same world. And the magic exists all through, and it is treated differently in each of these time periods. And that's what Alloy of Law is: looking at the Mistborn world, hundreds of years later, where society has been rebuilt following the events of the third book.

    The analogous time period in our world [for Alloy of Law's setting] would be about 1910, but that's not really very accurate, because in the Mistborn world there are certain things they're much better at—metallurgy, for one, obviously—but they're very poor with communication, because everyone's very concentrated in one area, so long-distance communication is just not one of the things that's very important to them. So it's not a one-to-one correlation. But electricity is starting to be installed in homes, and steam power is used quite extensively.

    Leigh Butler

    It sounds to me like it almost might be described as steampunk.

    Brandon Sanderson

    It has one toe dabbling in steampunk, but I don't call it that because while there is magic and technology, it's not quite the same. The steampunk genre has a certain Victorian feel to it; there's an air that makes something steampunk, and this isn't quite that.

    So anyway, it's the story of a man who lives in the frontier lands, and comes back to the big city because he's inherited lands and a title. And he has certain things in his past that make him feel it's time to leave his old life and come to a new one. And the goal here was not epic scope; with The Way of Kings on one side I didn't want that. This is more a mystery/adventure, and I think it's really fun.

    Leigh Butler

    So the plan is for this to be another trilogy?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I do have another epic trilogy planned for this world in a more modern era, but this is not that. This is actually a sort of side story I decided to start telling. I don't want to be doing multiple big epics at once, and between The Stormlight Archive and The Wheel of Time, I've already got two I'm working on, and that's enough. With this one I decided to do something a little more action/adventure and a little more self-contained. So Alloy of Law is not the start of a trilogy, though I may do a little more with the characters, but in general the story I wanted to tell is told. So it's a standalone much the same way Elantris is.

    Tags

  • 120

    Interview: Nov 16th, 2010

    Brandon Sanderson

    Cuthbert gave Brandon packs of Magic cards in Italian and Brandon had him sign one of the cards, which was neat.

    Other things we discussed included the Mistborn movie (Brandon has seen a screenplay and it was pretty good, but the project is not for sure going to be made). Dreamworks Animation has the rights to Alcatraz and Red Eagle has the rights to Wheel of Time.

    There was an April Fools joke at one point that Lindsay Lohan was going to play Vin in the movie by Brandon's friend Dan Wells who does the Writing Excuses podcast for aspiring writers with Brandon. If you haven't listened to their podcast yet you should, its quite entertaining even for people who have no desire to become writers. Brandon mentioned that maybe about 50% of the audience is listening just for fun and may not have an actual desire to become professional authors.

    Finally, Brandon told us that he is likely coming back to Europe next year. He wants to get to the UK very much and will likely go to the Imaginales d'epinal convention which is in March. He said that he generally has more time at conventions to do things like play Magic than at signings as there are events over multiple days, parties, etc...

    Tags

  • 121

    Interview: Aug 4th, 2011

    Question

    I think I saw on Facebook that you are involved with a Mistborn movie and game. Can you tell us about that?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Ah, yes. The Mistborn movie and game. The movie rights were optioned to a production studio called Paloopa Pictures. We'll see what happens with that. I mean, they have a screenplay—if you don't know, getting a film made, there are a lot of ways that it happens; most of them seem kind of chaotic. One of the primary ways is a production company will option rights on something or option a screenplay. In my case, they optioned the rights, they write a screenplay, they do a big pitch, then they go to the studios. And the studios have to fund the thing. The production company would then become the producers on it, with the studios funding and make the film.

    That's why what'll happen, often you'll see a film that'll [have] these five production studios at the start. Those are the people who did that sort of thing. So that's where we are there.

    Sometimes you'll get lucky and a film will just get optioned by a studio directly. That doesn't happen as often. For instance, the Wheel of Time books got optioned to Red Eagle Entertainment, which is a production company. They did all of this, then went to Universal and got Universal to buy the rights and fund the movie... We have that. We also have some people with a video game that I can't announce yet, because I'm sure they want to announce it, but we had a nice offer on a video game that would be slated for around 2013. It will be cross-platform, so it would be on PC, Xbox, and PS3. I will probably be writing the story and the dialogue for it.

    Tags

  • 122

    Interview: Aug 4th, 2011

    Question

    Do you think writing Robert Jordan's books affected your writing style in any way?

    Brandon Sanderson

    It did. It affected me, you know, It definitely affected me. Robert Jordan was very good at some very important things. He was great with viewpoint, he was very good at foreshadowing and subtlety. In fact, I think he was way more subtle than I've been, and I think those are things I've learned by working on this project. And also, just being able to balance so many different characters and viewpoints. That's something I think I learned. Though you know, I consciously when I wrote Alloy of Law, which is next, I consciously said, you know, I think I'm going to use a different style. There are some people who love the Wheel of Time, there are some people who don't like the Wheel of Time, and I don't want to become, you know, my style to become the Wheel of Time style. It's my own style. The Way of Kings is certainly more like Wheel of Time, you know, but also more like all the classic epics and fantasy that I read. Alloy of Law is intentionally not like that. Alloy of Law is more of a fast-paced thriller plotting style than it is epic fantasy.

    Tags

  • 123

    Interview: Aug 4th, 2011

    Question

    This is for Isaac, actually. What are you working on right now? Are you working with anything with Brandon or with someone else?

    Isaac Stewart

    Yeah, I am. (To Brandon: can I tell them about the Feruchemical—? Brandon: Yeah.) I just finished a version of the Feruchemical table. If you’ve seen the Allomantic table, it's very similar to that. New frames. I actually created it a different way, and I think it looks nicer than the other one. It makes me want to go back and redo the other one (laughter) but it also has new symbols and some new information.

    Brandon Sanderson

    That'll debut in the Mistborn RPG, and then we'll sell prints.

    Tags

  • 124

    Interview: Aug 4th, 2011

    Question

    Question for all three of you guys. I know there's a lack of artwork to be able to put as [desktop] backgrounds—I know Way of Kings has some really neat ones, but like I love the artwork on yours... I know a lot of the stuff you've done with Mistborn, with Way of Kings symbols, I'd love to have good hi-res stuff, so if you guys ever have time, put something like that on your websites because—

    Isaac Stewart

    I've actually got that. I can totally put that up [online], yeah.

    Question

    [unheard question]

    Brandon Sanderson

    We keep meaning to, for the people who bought the ebooks. In the ebooks you can't see the interior art really well; we're going to put up hi-res versions of it. It is planned, but we've just got so much stuff to do. (laughter) And I of course don't own the rights to Michael Whelan's artwork, so we can't do much with that. But we can put up Isaac's artwork.

    Tags

  • 125

    Interview: Aug 4th, 2011

    Question

    Second question kind of goes to your Alloy of Law book. I was wondering: what was the inspiration for using Breeze’s relative, and just kind of the time frame of the thing.

    Brandon Sanderson

    There were a lot of inspirations for a lot of different things. You'll kind of have to wait until I post the annotations. I talk a lot about it in the annotations. Basically, I wanted, since we're jumping forward so far, I wanted there to be some roots in there of the series you already read and loved. And for those who have read the earlier series, there will be at least one Easter egg per chapter about things like that. If you haven't, I didn't want it to be a big deal that would keep you from reading the book, but I want a lot of that to be in there. And so, when other characters are mentioned you'll see the characters of the first three books become the mythology to the people there.

    Tags

  • 126

    Interview: Aug 4th, 2011

    Question

    On your site, you have kind of a newspaper sheet for Alloy of Law...

    Brandon Sanderson

    You mean this? (Holds up a broadsheet)

    Question

    Yes!

    Brandon Sanderson

    You'll be able to pick one of these up when you come through the line.

    Tags

  • 127

    Interview: Aug 4th, 2011

    Question

    I just want you to say yes or no: does either Marsh or Sazed show up in the Alloy of Law?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Oh, you get a RAFO card! There you go...

    Tags

  • 128

    Interview: Aug 4th, 2011

    Question

    Just real quick: the short that's in the RPG, the short story. Is that ever going to be available outside the RPG?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Maybe eventually. The idea is that we gave it to them exclusively for a certain period; I don't know how long the period is. It's probably a couple of years. The idea being: the short story is there as a goodie for the RPG. You know, the RPG guys, RPGs are not big sellers. These are an independent company making it because they love it. It's not their day job. They all have other day jobs. Though, we wanted to put something in there that would attract people's attention to look at it and be interested in it. They will eventually, probably be available elsewhere. If you can read other languages, it'll probably be in the translations of Alloy of Law. But that's only if you want to read it in translation.

    Tags

  • 129

    Interview: Aug 4th, 2011

    Question

    So, apart from writing the short story for the Mistborn RPG, how involved were you in developing it?

    Brandon Sanderson

    The Mistborn RPG? I sat down in several brainstorming sessions with them and gave them all of my notes from the world and now they have sent me what they have come up with and it's actually half rules, half world book, is the idea. Now I'm going to go through and revise it to make sure there's nothing wrong with it. But, you know, I did a lot of brainstorming with them, but they're the game designers so I let them kind of design the game as they wanted to.

    Tags

  • 130

    Interview: Aug 4th, 2011

    Question

    Do you have any considerations for ever turning any of your works into a movie?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yeah, I've sold rights on Alcatraz and those eventually lapsed. They had the option for three years. I've sold rights on Mistborn. That's still going strong. I've had inquiries about a couple of others. I can't say, though, because there's nothing sure. Though we did do the Mistborn video game and the handshake, is essentially a done deal now. We've just got to get the contract, fine details nailed down. Yes. Mistborn video game is a go. It's for sure.

    Question

    Tentative dates?

    Brandon Sanderson

    2013. Fall.

    Question

    Which company?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I can't say that, though it is going to be cross-platform, all three major platforms, so PC, 360, and PS3. The plan right now is that it is going to be a prequel. (Everyone "oooohs") So it'll have new story and I'll be writing the story.

    Question

    Speaking of videogames, I don't know if you or anyone else here have noticed the similarities in the storyline of Fable III and Mistborn.

    Brandon Sanderson

    You know, people have said that to me and I haven't played Fable III.

    Question

    It's really uncanny. Yours was written first, obviously, but going through it I was just like, "I wonder if he knows how parallel this runs."

    Brandon Sanderson

    I'll have to play those.

    Questioner

    I can actually get you a copy.

    Brandon Sanderson

    You can get me a copy? Hey, get me copies! Yeah, hey, he works for Microsoft!

    Questioner

    For real.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Okay. I've got a 360. Epic Games sent me a 360 so I might as well play with it!

    Question

    Is that for the Mistborn...?

    Brandon Sanderson

    No, I'm working with Epic on something else. I'll be able to announce that eventually, but Epic's got a studio in Salt Lake and so I've been working with them on something. But that's not official so I can't say anything about that.

    Tags

  • 131

    Interview: Aug 4th, 2011

    Question

    In the prologue in The Alloy of Law, it talks about how the guy actually spikes people to the wall. Is there going to be Hemalurgy involved?

    Brandon Sanderson

    That's a RAFO. Hey, RAFOs! I will say, in Alloy of Law time, Hemalurgy is not well-known and that's not been spread around, and Feruchemy as an art moved like Allomancy did in that you can have just one of the powers. And we decided... Chemings? What did we decide, Peter? Oh, Ferings. We decided Ferings. We couldn't decide bewteen the two of those. It's in the book somewhere. [Editor's note: Um, I don't think so.] But anyway, you can have one Allomantic and one Feruchemical. But not a lot of Mistborn and not a lot of full Feruchemists anymore.

    Question

    Do you explain how the Feruchemists came back, because at the end there were a lot of eunuchs and...

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yeah, well, that's one of the reasons why Feruchemy has been split because it's very diluted now. The Terris people did survive because they made it. And so, the genetic code is there.

    Questioner

    And so, every once in a while, hereditarily, the gene will come up.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yeah. But that's why there aren't very many full-blooded Feruchemists anymore. A thousand years of the Lord Ruler trying to breed it out of the population followed by a cataclysm that destroyed most of the population of the world did them in, yeah.

    Tags

  • 132

    Interview: Aug 4th, 2011

    Question

    I'm relatively new to fantasy. For the Mistborn series, I'm curious: do you find out the origins of Ruin and Preservation?

    Brandon Sanderson

    ...Eventually, eventually. You should talk to these guys. (signals to 17th Sharders) They'll talk your ears off, and then some. Eventually perhaps you will.

    Mi'chelle

    (laughter) Liar!

    Questioner

    But not yet.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Well, they know some things.

    Mi'chelle

    Mi’chelle: Just go to 17thshard.com and plan a LOT of time.

    Brandon Sanderson

    They've got big theories because all my books are connected, so yes. They have lots of theories talking about that.

    Last question.

    Tags

  • 133

    Interview: Aug 4th, 2011

    Josh

    Why can Sazed read minds in Alloy of Law when Ruin can't?

    Brandon Sanderson

    RAFO. Well wait, who's mind is he reading?

    Josh

    Wax's.

    Mi'chelle

    Eric argues he talks directly to Wax.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Mmmmhmmm.

    Tags

  • 134

    Interview: Aug 4th, 2011

    Josh

    Is Preservation is a force of stability?

    [Eric's note: Sorry, this is my bad. I emailed Josh these questions and um, I clearly did not complete my sentence... Now it's just a stupid question. Oops.]

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes, it's unchangingness. It's the opposite of Ruin.

    Tags

  • 135

    Interview: Aug 4th, 2011

    Josh

    If Elendel is named for Elend then who's Lutha?

    Brandon Sanderson

    RAFO.

    Tags

  • 136

    Interview: Aug 4th, 2011

    Josh

    The Allomantic metals are separated into four quadrants. Do the Shards have classifications as well, in groups of four?

    Brandon Sanderson

    This division, the Allomantic division is a thing researchers and scholars placed upon it.

    Tags

  • 137

    Interview: Aug 4th, 2011

    Josh

    How does one detect a new Feruchemist?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Feruchemists, when they touch metals, have an empathy for the metal that they can use.

    Tags

  • 138

    Interview: Aug 4th, 2011

    Josh

    When non-god metals are burned Allomantically, what happens to the metals? Are they crushed into tiny specks? Do they disappear?

    Brandon Sanderson

    The metals become a key conduit through which the power is delivered. So they are actually sort of vaporized, and the atomic code is a key by which the power is drawn in.

    Tags

  • 139

    Interview: Aug 1st, 2011

    Brandon Sanderson

    Now for the big announcement. Crafty Games' Mistborn Adventure Game tabletop RPG's cover art has been revealed, and they're running a preorder special from August 4th through 7th. The RPG comes out in November, but you can preview it at Gen Con this weekend if you're lucky enough to be attending. The book's many illustrations, including the cover, come from artist Ben McSweeney, who also provided illustrations for The Way of Kings and The Alloy of Law.

    The book also includes the Kelsier short story that I mentioned back during the Mistborn 2 annotations. Some readers have been clamoring for this for years, so if you want to find out about Kelsier's training with his master Gemmel, pick up the RPG.

    Tags

  • 140

    Interview: Jul 11th, 2010

    baldwinsusa

    I like how your book covers mysteriously lead us into wrong conclusions about who characters are. Who comes up with that? You mostly, or does publisher have input??

    Brandon Sanderson

    Mostly, those are the publisher's deal. I generally have some input, but only a small input. The longer I go, the more I have to say. Often, I will suggest scenes, but it's up to the publisher/artist to decide. For example, the cover of Mistborn 3 was originally a concept cover for the cover of Mistborn One. Everyone liked it so much, they decided to tweak the sketch and do a full painting for Mistborn 3.

    Tags

  • 141

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    RankWeis ()

    The characters in Mistborn all have very French names. My girlfriend insists Vin's name is pronounced almost "Veh", as it would be in France, and I'm almost convinced. How do you pronounce it?

    You've also mentioned that in Elantris, there was more to Seons than what came out in the book (as far as a magic system, I believe). When you have to omit something like this, do you still consider it canon to the story? For example, if you were to write a sequel, would you feel obligated to stick with the original magic system you put into place (but never published), or would you be fine with drawing up a whole new one?

    Brandon Sanderson

    The Central Dominance is intentionally French sounding. I say Vin's name like an American would, but everyone in world would say it with a French accent. Same goes for Kelsier, (which they would say Kel-syay.) Again, I say it as an American would, but then I'm not from the Central Dominance.

    Yes, I consider the ideas around Seons to be canon, though I don't always canonize something that is not in the books. If it isn't on paper, I'm usually willing to change it as it needs to in order to fit. One issue, however, is that things like the Seons are part of the greater magic system of the Cosmere (which connects many of my works.) I can't change things too much, or I'll start contradicting myself. (Which I don't want to do.)

    LOVEGGS

    One further question on pronunciation- Sazed. Is it sayzd, sayzed, or sah-zahd? I always pictured the Terris people as somewhat Arabic so Sah-zahd came more naturally to me, but I'm curious as to what the intended pronunciation is.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I say Sayzed, as does Kelsier. The Terris a is not as harsh as that, but it's not quite a soft "a" either.

    Tags

  • 142

    Interview: Nov 30th, 2009

    David Lenberg

    David: Well, in fact that book is sitting on my shelf and I'm going to take it down over the weekend. So, let's talk about Warbreaker. Was Warbreaker released earlier this year?

    Brandon Sanderson

    It was. It was released in June, so I've really been on tour for both that and the Wheel of Time at the same time. Warbreaker is a book I wrote back in 2006. It is a stand-alone single volume epic fantasy. I wrote this before I was even aware that I would be asked to work on the Wheel of Time, and so it's kind of coincidental they've ended up coming out the same year. But that's because the Wheel of Time book which I wrote in 2008 got fast-tracked and came out as soon as they could get it through production, where the other one had been waiting in the queue for a little while.

    And so Warbreaker is my solo work. It's about a number of things. Any good book, it's about more than one idea coming together. People always ask me, where do I get my ideas? Well, I find that it's hard to explain because you have to track down so many different ones to talk about where a book comes from. A lot of new or aspiring writers try to write a book with just one idea, and that never works for me. I've got to have a good dozen or so.

    But what is Warbreaker about? It's about me reacting against other things I've written, in a lot of ways. The Mistborn trilogy, which you mentioned, is what I was best known for before the Wheel of Time. And it is a series about a group of thieves struggling in a world where evil has won. A lot of epic fantasy deals with the same concept: you know, a young unknown protagonist discovers he has a talent for magic or a destiny and goes on this quest to defeat the dark evil. It happened in Harry Potter, it happened in Lord of the Rings, it happened in The Eye of the World, some of my favorite books. And when it came time to write my own books and break in, I was wondering. . .you know, these stories have been done so well, I want to go other directions. And so Mistborn became the story of what happens if good loses. What happens if the dark lord wins? What happens if Harry Potter would have gotten to the end of that story and Voldemort would have killed him and taken over the world? Or what if Sauron had gotten that Ring? And so that became the history of this book series, and the stories then are about a group of so-called rejects who aren't the prophesied heroes, who aren't following what's supposed to happen, who are working in this world to try and overthrow this empire. So it is a very. . .it's kind of a dark, oppressive series. I think it's very good. People find it very exciting and enjoyable. But there are certain themes: the darkness certainly is one, and the instigating a rebellion against an oppressive force, and these sort of things.

    And when it came time to write Warbreaker, I wanted to try something different. I felt that I'd spent so long dealing with darkness, I wanted to use color instead as a focus. And so one of the themes became color and how color represents life, and the magic in the world is based around the concept of color. Beyond that, I'd been thinking for a long time that anarchy and setting up a rebellion and these sorts of things could actually be a lot easier than the concept of stopping a war. Starting one, in many ways, could be easier. And I wanted to tell a story about someone who's working against a ticking time bomb to try and stop two kingdoms which are just bent on going to war with one another because of different factions, and seeing if he could dig out what's really going on and get to the root of it, and stop it.

    And that's part of the theme, but there are so many other things. In part, it's about an agnostic god who doesn't believe in the religion that worships him. It's about two sisters who have to exchange roles in life. It's about a sarcastic talking sword who really likes to kill people. I mean, there are a lot of things going on in this book.

    David Lenberg

    I heard you say 'an agnostic god'.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes. Yes, in this world, one of the things that happens is that a certain group of people with a certain magical powers. . . What will happen is, if someone dies in a way that's very heroic, according to the religion, they will be brought back to life and will have visions of the future. And these people are worshipped by one of the cultures, someone who has been brought back to life, and then asked to give them divinations and things like this. And one of these people, he has no memory of his past life. All he knows is that he woke up and everyone told that he had died in a very heroic way and that he was now a divine figure. And they asked him for interpretations and prophecies, and he doesn't believe in any of it. So while they're worshipping him, he's actually pretty agnostic himself. So it's kind of an interesting situation for someone to be in.

    Tags

  • 143

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Melhay

    Is Adonalsium going to be mentioned by name in Warbreaker and The Way of Kings or is he going to be an underlining "God"(I don't know what to call him yet) idea? I am curious now, so I will have to keep my eyes open for him.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Adonalsium (Ahy-doe-Nahl-see-um) will be mentioned by name again. Ruin and Preservation were what have been called Shards of Adonalsium. (The Voice from Warbreaker is another Shard.)

    Melhay

    Is this "character" a common link between your books for religion or magical or maybe even both?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Adonalsium has to do with the Cosmere, which is the word Realmatic philosophers use to refer to the greater universe of the Shardworlds. It's hard to separate religion, magic, science, and society in most of these worlds. So "both" is a good guess.

    Melhay

    I was curious because he just seemed to appear and nothing further on him/it. Thank you for mentioning that he is in these two other books, I will have to look for hints of him.

    Brandon Sanderson

    The word Adonalsium (or, well, the miss-spelling of it) appears in only one of the books. Other clues and links between the books can be found as well. (Some people on my forums have spotted some of them. Others have gone unspotted so far.)

    Tags

  • 144

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Chaos2651

    In Mistborn, you say its planet is called Scadriel. In-universe, where (or when) did the name Scadriel come to be used to be describe the Mistborn planet? Did the Lord Ruler and his obligators use that as the name of the planet, or did it come later, post-Mistborn 3? Or is "Scadriel" just what you as an author use to refer to it?

    Brandon Sanderson

    It is "In Universe" so to speak, though the name itself isn't known to the people on-planet. The Lord Ruler was the only one who understood the exact nature of a planet, really, though some of the obligators and noble scholars had a general idea. Astronomy was one of the scientific areas where the Lord Ruler didn't mind people doing research, so long as it kept their interest away from chemistry or a science that could lead to advances in weaponry.

    Scadrial would then have been the name that Ruin and Preservation understood for the planet, as well as certain other groups and individuals of a less directly divine nature.

    Tags

  • 145

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Chaos2651

    Is there a rationale to how Hemalurgic powers are distributed? I tried to look for a system, but they seem rather randomly distributed. For example, the spike which steals Allomantic powers for a particular quadrant is not always in one particular spot.

    Brandon Sanderson

    That is correct, it's not always in one particular spot. None of them are. I used as my model on this magic system the concept of acupuncture and pressure points. Placing a Hemalurgic spike is a very delicate and specific art. Imagine there being a different overlay on a human body, like a new network of nerves, representing lines, points, and 'veins' of the soul's spiritual makeup.

    What is happening with Hemalurgy, essentially, is that you're driving a spike through a specific point on a person's body and ripping off a piece of their soul. It sticks to the spike on the Spiritual Realm. Then, you place that spike on someone else in a specific place (not exactly the same place, but on the right spiritual pressure point) and 'hot wire' the spirit to give it Hemalurgy or Feruchemy. It's like you're fooling the spiritual DNA, creating a work-around. Or, in some cases, changing the spirit to look like something else, which has the immediate effect of distorting the body and transforming it into a new creature.

    Hemalurgy is a very brutal way of making changes like this, though, so it often has monstrous effects. (Like with the koloss.) And in most cases, it leaves a kind of 'hole' in the spirit's natural defenses, which is how Ruin was able to touch the souls of Hemalurgists directly.

    Tags

  • 146

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Chaos2651

    Can you tell us what the rest of the Feruchemical and Hemalurgic powers are? Since, you know, you won't be writing in the Mistborn world for many years, and those Feruchemical and Hemalurgic Tables might not even come into existence if the Allomantic Metals one doesn't sell. Pretty please?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I will release this eventually. I'm still tweaking the powers—their names, and how they function—and so I'd rather hold off on revealing anything specific right now. We might include them in the RPG, though.

    Chaos2651

    When is the Table of Allomantic Metals coming out?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Printer emailed me today for final confirmation. Should be very soon now.

    Tags

  • 147

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Chaos2651

    Hemalurgically, atium steals Allomantic Temporal Powers. But, that seems unlikely, since atium is a god metal. It wouldn't fit in with the rest of the magic system. Did Preservation, in addition to switching Cadmium and Bendalloy for Atium and Malatium, also switch atium's Feruchemical and Hemalurgic powers with Cadmium? Because it seems to me there's not a lot of atium Marsh can use to live for hundreds of years into the next Mistborn trilogy.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Preservation wanted Atium and Malatium to be of use to the people, as he recognized that it would be a very powerful tool—and that using it up could help defeat Ruin. But he also recognized that sixteen was a mythological important number, and felt it would make the best sign for his followers. So he took out the most unlikely (difficult to make and use) metals for his sign to his followers. But that doesn't have much to do with Hemalurgy's use here.

    Remember that the tables—and the ars Arcanum—are 'in world' creations. (Or, at least, in-universe.) The knowledge represented in them is as people understand it, and can always have flaws. That was the case with having atium on the table in the first place, and that was the case with people (specifically the Inquisitors) trying to figure out what atium did Hemalurgically.

    Their experiments (very expensive ones) are what determined that atium (which they thought was just one of the sixteen metals) granted the Allomantic Temporal powers. What they didn't realize is that atium (used correctly) could steal ANY of the powers. Think of it as a wild card. With the right knowledge, you could use it to mimic any other spike. It works far better than other spikes as well.

    As for Marsh, he's got a whole bag of atium (taken off of the Kandra who was going to try to sell it.) So he's all right for quite a while. A small bead used right can reverse age someone back to their childhood.

    But this was a little beyond their magical understanding at the time.

    Tags

  • 148

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Chaos2651

    Will Sazed appear at all in the Stormlight Archive?

    Brandon Sanderson

    There are no current plans for him to do so.

    Tags

  • 149

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Chaos2651

    In the days of the Final Empire, how does one acquire a Kandra Contract? It's not like they can just walk up to their hidden Homeland and ask for their services.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Same way you would go about hiring an assassin. Secretly, using contacts who have used them before. You have to be in the know and well-connected, either with the upper-class or the underground.

    Tags

  • 150

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    little_wilson

    So, Brandon. Hoid. I remember you saying at the Idaho Falls signing last year that he was in Well of Ascension. We, your dedicated fans who like scouring books searching for obscure characters who have any possibility of being the mysterious Hoid, have yet to find him. Peter sent us on a hunt for him (Hoid, not Peter...) in the deleted scenes, and we found his boot-print.

    Now, I think he broke the pottery there too—the one holding the larasium—and since there's broken pottery in the actual version, I think he may have snuck into the cavern and broken it as well. If so, is this Hoid's part in Well of Ascension? This trace of him? I commend you if it is. It is clever, making us think it was a person, when in fact it's just something he did.

    Brandon Sanderson

    You are on the right track, but wrong on one point. Hoid does appear in the book.

    I had originally toyed with making his touch on the novel more obscure, but decided that I wanted to be consistent with the other novels by actually having him appear. Once I realized I'd probably cut the scene with the footprint, I decided I needed this actual appearance even more badly.

    Fortunately, I knew what Hoid had been up to all this time, and had placed him in a position where several characters could run into him. In Well of Ascension, Hoid believed (as Vin did) that the Well was in the North, even though it was not. He spent much of the book pursuing this idea.

    Through events, however, he discovered he was wrong. He made the realization after Vin did, but only because of a chance meeting. (This is recorded in the books. Let's just say he was listening in when someone implied that the Well was in Luthadel.)

    He hurried to Luthadel, and was in the town, skulking about in the last parts of the novel. He isn't seen here, though he does still infiltrate the Well. (Hoid is quite proficient at manipulating Shadesmar for his own ends.)

    Tags

  • 151

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    MarlonRand

    Additionally, how much time would you say that you spend researching on any given work, and what are some of the things that you research?

    Brandon Sanderson

    That one's really too hard to judge.

    Research for me is on-going for any given work, and I don't track how much time I spend on it. Generally, I dig into specific topics when the need arises, then do more 'cast out the net' general reading for ideas the rest of the time. Generally, I'll only dig in deeply if a topic is important to a specific story. (Such as—for Mistborn—researching canals or the effects of being made a eunuch at various ages.)

    Tags

  • 152

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Chaos2651

    One other question, what is the name of the planet that Elantris is on?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Elantris: Sel

    Warbreaker: Nalthis

    Mistborn: Scadrial

    Way of Kings: Roshar

    White Sand: Taldain

    Dragonsteel: Yolen

    There are others, but I haven't talked much about those yet, so I'll leave them off for now.

    Tags

  • 153

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Czanos

    Any idea when you'll be releasing the full table of Allomantic metals and associated phonetics shown in your blog post about vinyl decals?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Very, very soon. It's at the printer right now. Should happen this month, if all things go well. We will start with the limited edition prints on the nice paper with the expensive inks, signed and numbered by myself and Isaac. Poster prints will come eventually too. And, of course, we'll also release in standard desktop sizes for free, for those who can't afford a poster.

    Tags

  • 154

    Interview: Nov 11th, 2011

    Wetlandernw

    Why do the Twinborn in Alloy of Law have only one feruchemical power, when all previous feruchemists, in spite of breeding programs, could use all the metals? (from travyl) Or were Ferrings always part of the system and we just didn't meet them in Mistborn? (my addition)

    Brandon Sanderson

    The Ferrings are a new development since Mistborn, as the Feruchemists have been interbreeding with the Allomancers. Basically, the Allomancy genes interfere with the Feruchemistry genes, breaking it down and creating the limitations we see in Alloy of Law. (His response to this was really fun—he found it a very perceptive question, and enjoyed talking about it. I wish I'd had my recorder handy so I could give you the full transcript instead of the boiled-down version.)

    Tags

  • 155

    Interview: Nov 11th, 2011

    Wetlandernw

    Is this a prequel to the "modern" trilogy? How far into the future is that? (in-world)

    Brandon Sanderson

    There will be several "Wax and Wayne" books dealing with the next development; they're not so much "prequel" as they are a side venture into life between the first and second trilogies, but they will be used to provide some foreshadowing for the second trilogy. Incidentally, he also described the beginning of the second trilogy as "a Misting SWAT team trying to figure out how to take out a criminal Mistborn." He also said that the third trilogy will be much nearer "hard scifi" as their understanding of Allomancy and Feruchemistry enables them to develop FTL propulsion.

    Tags

  • 156

    Interview: Nov 11th, 2011

    Brandon Sanderson

    The contract has been signed for the Mistborn game, but he can't announce the company yet; they want to do a big announcement with cool artwork and stuff, and they aren't ready yet. BWS will be writing all the dialog and the ending to make sure it's a satisfying wrap-up, but he won't interfere in the game content. He'll have some voting rights over characterizations/actors. The announcement should come in January; it will be set as a prequel to the first Mistborn trilogy.

    Tags

  • 157

    Interview: Nov 11th, 2011

    Brandon Sanderson

    Upcoming book plans: A Memory of Light is first, of course; he expects to follow that with Book 2 of the Stormlight Archive in March or April 2013. Book 2 will have Shallan as the focus character (like Kaladin was in book 1), followed in subsequent books by Szeth, Navani and Dalinar. Once the first 5 Stormlight books are out, he plans to do the second Mistborn trilogy, then books 6-10 of Stormlight. Interspersed with the first 5 Stormlight books, he'll do several more Wax and Wayne books; similar to Alloy of Law, they'll be shorter, lighter, more witty & adventurous than the epics.

    Warbreaker 2 will be another "in between" book; he plans to use the same process as the first Warbreaker, posting sections on his website and getting feedback, using a very open and interactive process of development.

    Tags

  • 158

    Interview: Nov 16th, 2011

    Open The Fridge

    Let’s start with an Alloy of Law question, since that’s why we’re both here. You’ve obviously put a lot of thought into the evolution of the world of Scadrial, specifically in how you’ve integrated the world’s technological advances. Was there anything in particular that drew you to the old west setting, and did you do anything to research it, like going to a shooting range or a ranch?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Good question. I actually wrote the prologue LAST. I wrote it to be the prologue to another book about Wax and Wayne if I did one. I always knew what happened, but I didn’t want to start the book with the old west, because most of it didn’t happen in the old west, it happened in the city. What is now chapter one used to be the prologue. And after writing the whole book I realized that we didn’t see into Wax’s heart, we didn’t know what he was always referencing with Lessie… we actually needed to see it. And so I actually took that chapter and moved it to the front. I worry a bit that it will old-west-ify it a bit too much, because I did see this as a city book. All of the Mistborn books have taken place in cities.

    Open The Fridge

    And will that hold true for the second trilogy, as well?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes. It might not hold for the final one in the same way. But as for the research I did... I actually got my gun nut friend. Gun nuts are very particular. He’s a big Wheel of Time fan, and a very big gun nut. I got him to read the book and give me all the “this is how a gun nut says you’re doing it wrong” notes. That’s how I usually do something that specific. I like to write the book, and then go find an expert. For instance, in The Way of Kings, Kaladin’s surgery and first aid things. I wrote the book, I did do some reading on it, but then I sent it to an author that my editor knows. He’s a medical doctor, and I had him read those things and tell me what I was doing wrong. I prefer to do it that way and then fix it, because I can do enough, but there’s a certain understanding curve. I can pick up 75% of what I need to sound authentic with a little bit of research, and that last 25% requires a Ph.D. (laughs) And so rather than getting a Ph.D., I just give it to someone who has a PhD, and they can crosscheck it for me.

    Tags

  • 159

    Interview: Nov 16th, 2011

    Open The Fridge

    You’re very talented at taking seemingly mundane or unusual things and creating magic systems around them, like color in Warbreaker, metals in Mistborn, and light in The Way of Kings. Can you explain how you decide what to use for a magical system in a book, and your process for building a coherent system once the initial concept has been decided?

    Brandon Sanderson

    First of all, I’m looking for something that fits the book that I’m writing. So for instance, in Mistborn, I was looking for powers that would enhance what thieves could do. I was also looking for something that had one foot in alchemy, in that kind of “coming-of-age magic into science” way. Alchemy is a great example because it’s a blend of science and magic… well, really, a blend of science and superstition, because the magic part doesn’t work. So something resonates there.

    I’m also looking for interesting ways to ground [the magic] in our world, and using something mundane is a great way to do that. Magic is naturally fantastical, and so if I can instead use something normal, and then make it fantastical, it immediately creates a sort of… ease of understanding. Burning metals sounds so weird, but it was chosen for that same reason, because we gain a lot of our energy through metabolism. We eat something, we turn the sugars into energy, boom. So that’s actually a very natural feeling. When I started writing out some sample things, it felt surprisingly natural, that people eat metal and gain powers, even though it sounds so weird. It’s because of this kind of natural biology. So I’m looking for that.

    Once I have a magic system, I look for really great limitations. Limitations really make a magic system work better. Wheel of Time is a great example. Having a magic system where you can weave all these threads is awesome. Having a magic system where you do that, and then it drives you mad, is even better. It creates plot hooks, it creates drama, it creates challenge. [That limitation] is brilliant, I think it is one of the most brilliant ever made, especially because it also changes your characters. It has a deep influence on your character arcs, so you can tie it into character.

    Beyond that (and this is kind of pulling back the curtain a little bit), there is no specific defined place where someone goes mad, so you can actually stretch it out and use it when you need it. It doesn’t constrain you too much. Like if your magic system’s limitation is, “When you use this magic, you have to use the head of one of your grandparents.” (laughs) You can use that magic four times! It’s limited, but also very constrained. Going mad is not as constrained. There’s a spectrum there - you can use it when you need it. So I’m looking for cool limitations that will work that way, in ways that I can use to force the characters to be creative. A good limitation will force you to be creative, and your characters to be creative. Pushing and pulling metals is basically telekinesis, right? But by making it center of mass, you can only pull directly towards yourself or push directly away from yourself... Number one: it’s vector science. It has one foot in sciences. Number two: it feels very natural to us because this is how we manipulate force ourselves. Number three: it limits things so much that it forces creativity upon the characters. There’s that sweet spot, where they can be creative and do cool things, where it doesn’t become too limited, but it also keeps you from having too much power in the hands of the characters, so they are still being challenged. I’m looking for all that, and on top of that I want to have good sensory ways to use magic.

    I don’t want to have two wizards staring at each other, and then be like “and they stared at each other very deeply! And then they stared harder!” I don’t want it all to be internal, which is where the lines for the metals came from. You see something, you push it forward. The pulses that some of the allomancers use, they’ll hear. I wanted sensory applications.

    Tags

  • 160

    Interview: Nov 16th, 2011

    Open The Fridge

    Ok, last question. It was really difficult coming up with three questions that haven’t been asked already...

    Brandon Sanderson

    OK... you’re not going to ask me the “what would you ask me” question?

    Open The Fridge

    Not quite...

    Brandon Sanderson

    OK good, because I hate that one! (laughs)

    Open The Fridge

    My question is if there’s anything that you’ve never been asked that you would like to talk about?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Oooooh, ok. Hm. That one is so hard! Every time people ask me something like this... What have I never been asked that people should be asking, is basically what the question is? Something that the fans have just missed... They pick up on so much, that it’s hard... I do wonder if, you know… all the magic systems [in my books] are connected and work on some basic fundamental principles, and a lot of people haven’t been asking questions about this. One thing I did get a question on today, and I’ll just talk about this one... they didn’t ask the right question, but I nudged them the right way, is understanding that tie between Aondor [the magic system from Elantris] and allomancy [Mistborn’s magic system].

    People ask about getting the power from metals and things, but that’s not actually how it works. The power’s not coming from metal. I talked a little about this before, but you are drawing power from some source, and the metal is actually just a gateway. It’s actually the molecular structure of the metal… what’s going on there, the pattern, the resonance of that metal works in the same way as an Aon does in Elantris. It filters the power. So it is just a sign of “this is what power this energy is going to be shaped into and give you.” When you understand that, compounding [in Alloy of Law] makes much more sense.

    Compounding is where you are able to kind of draw in more power than you should with feruchemy. What’s going on there is you’re actually charging a piece of metal, and then you are burning that metal as a feruchemical charge. What is happening is that the feruchemical charge overwrites the allomantic charge, and so you actually fuel feruchemy with allomancy, is what you are doing. Then if you just get out another piece of metal and store it in, since you’re not drawing the power from yourself, you’re cheating the system, you’re short-circuiting the system a little bit. So you can actually use the power that usually fuels allomancy, to fuel feruchemy, which you can then store in a metalmind, and basically build up these huge reservoirs of it. So what’s going on there is… imagine there’s like, an imprint, a wavelength, so to speak. A beat for an allomantic thing, that when you burn a metal, it says “ok, this is what power we give.” When it’s got that charge, it changes that beat and says, “now we get this power.” And you access a set of feruchemical power. That’s why compounding is so powerful.

    Tags

  • 161

    Interview: Nov 7th, 2011

    Neth

    The Alloy of Law seems to have literally sprung up from nowhere. So, where did it come from? How has The Alloy of Law impacted your overall plans for events on Scadrial [the planet where the events of Mistborn occur]? Is it part of the original set of trilogies you had mapped out?

    Brandon Sanderson

    This may be new information to some readers, but I've mentioned several places before that the Mistborn series was pitched to my editor as a sequence of three trilogies. Past, present, and future—epic fantasy, urban fantasy, and science fiction; all with the running thread of the magic system.

    Since I just started coming out with the Stormlight Archive, I want to commit myself to that and don't want to dig into the second Mistborn trilogy for quite a while. Yet I want to prep people for the idea that Mistborn is going to be around for a while, and they are going to be seeing more books. I didn't want it to just come out of nowhere at them in ten years or whenever I get to it. So I decided to do some interim stories.

    One of the things I'd been playing with was the idea of what happened between the epic fantasy and the urban fantasy trilogies. We have some very interesting things happening in the world, where you've got a cradle of mankind created (by design) to be very lush, very easy to live in, so a great big city could grow up there relatively quickly; civilization could build itself back up over the course of just a couple of generations. Yet there would be very little motivation to leave that area at first, which I felt would mean that you'd end up with this really great frontier boundary. The dichotomy between the two—the frontier and the quite advanced (all things considered) city in the cradle of humanity—was very interesting to me. So I started playing around with where things would lead.

    To worldbuild the urban fantasy trilogy coming up, I need to know everything that happened in the intervening centuries. Some stories popped up in there that I knew would happen, that would be referenced in the second trilogy. So I thought, why don't I tell some of these stories, to cement them in my mind and to keep the series going.

    I started writing The Alloy of Law not really knowing how long it would be—knowing the history and everything that happened, but not knowing how much of it I wanted to do in prose form. Things just clicked as they sometimes do, and I ended up turning it into a novel.

    Tags

  • 162

    Interview: Nov 7th, 2011

    Neth

    The Alloy of Law has the feel of a Western with just a dash of Steampunk. Did you do a lot research into Westerns to try and figure out how one could fit into your world or was it more of an organic process?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I'd say more organic. I honestly don't look at it as much of a Western. The part that is in a Western setting, the prologue, is actually the last thing I wrote, feeling I needed a better introduction. Originally the story just started in the city.

    As I said, I view it as a clash between these two concepts, the city and the frontier. Mistborn as a series has always been city-based, urban. I intend to keep it that way, mostly. The story here as I saw it was of the man who had been living out on the frontier for a long time who comes back and has to integrate into society. Which is another theme of the Mistborn books—just as in the original trilogy Vin had to go from the streets to upper society, I wondered what it would be like to deal with a character who had lived among the two-faced society of city politics and more or less rejected it, who gets pulled back against his will. So I would say it's less a Western and more a clash between that more simple, rugged lifestyle and the city lifestyle.

    Tags

  • 163

    Interview: Nov 7th, 2011

    Neth

    Wax is quite the archetype, complete with a side-kick and (potential) love interest. Where did he come from?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I don't generally sit down and say I'm going to write someone who's this archetype or that archetype. What I wanted for this book, honestly, was just to have fun. I love writing epic, awesome stories; I love stories that are full of deep character conflict and broad world-spanning conflict—but sometimes I just want to back away from that and have fun.

    The Wax archetype with the sidekick—the two of them were built from the ground up to be characters who played off one another well to facilitate good banter. Because I like to write good banter. I like to read it, I like to enjoy it. Whether it's Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, or Holmes and Watson or whatever—I get a kick out of these types of stories. So when I was writing this book, I was really just saying let's step back for a little while from the kind of stories I was writing with The Way of Kings and the Wheel of Time—which are both (I hope) very awesome, and deep, and complex—and let's do something that's just fun.

    Tags

  • 164

    Interview: Nov 7th, 2011

    Neth

    How has religion and mythology changed in the 300 years since the events of the Mistborn trilogy?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I had a bit of a challenge in this book because—and you may want to put a spoiler warning on this interview—at the end of the first Mistborn trilogy, one of the characters became the god of this world. He became a god figure, an almost omnipotent figure. I had planned this from the beginning, but it also offers a challenge, because in this world you have a real deity that is interacting, that is a character—not to say that in our world God doesn't interact with us, because as you know I am a faithful, religious person. However, I think there is a different interaction going here where the reader has spent time with this person as a character, and now he is a deity figure. So how to deal with this is one of the big challenges in worldbuilding this next several hundred years.

    I wanted Sazed to be involved—I didn't want to just have him vanish and not be part of things. I wanted to acknowledge what happened with him and make it part of the mythology of the story. But at the same time, having one of your characters turn into God runs you right into the trouble of literal deus ex machina, once one of your characters has all of this power. So walking that line was both exciting and also very challenging.

    I like to deal with religion in my books. I like to look at all aspects of it, and in this book I wanted to look at what it would be like if someone like Sazed had been put in this position and people started worshiping him—what do you do with that?

    Tags

  • 165

    Interview: Nov 7th, 2011

    Neth

    For those readers who read Mistborn years ago (or even not at all), what do they need to know before reading The Alloy of Law? Do you think this book is a good introduction to the world of Scadrial?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I honestly don't think you need to remember that much of the original trilogy, or even need to have read it at all, to enjoy this book. Granted, I drop some bombs on you in the epilogue—the epilogue and near ending of this book are deeply tied to the original trilogy, but the actual story of this book other than those after-the-fact bombs is very self-contained. Allomancy and Feruchemy are reintroduced; readers get some quick explanation of that. I think you can pick this up without having to read or reread the whole trilogy.

    Neth

    High Imperial? And where was Hoid?

    Brandon Sanderson

    You will have to look. Hoid is in the book, though his name doesn't appear. But the things happening here during this interim are not of deep interest to Hoid like the things happening in the original trilogy, so he is playing a much smaller role here than he was in the original trilogy.

    Also, High Imperial just cracks me up.

    Tags

  • 166

    Interview: Nov 7th, 2011

    Neth

    My understanding is that The Alloy of Law is intended to be more or less a stand-alone book. However, without giving too much away, it feels like there is a whole lot more of Wax's story to be told. When's the sequel coming?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I will most likely write a sequel. However, what you've got to remember is that I will be writing that future trilogy, the urban fantasy trilogy. The events in this book are of relation to what's happening in the future, so you will find out eventually the answers to the questions this book gives you, even if a sequel to this book never comes. But I more than likely will write more of these books over the next few years. The Stormlight Archive is my main focus following the Wheel of Time; I don't want to leave people hanging too much where that's concerned. But between books I will probably write more about these characters.

    Tags

  • 167

    Interview: 2011

    Twitter 2011 (WoT) (Verbatim)

    Gandy93 (14 November 2011)

    Will we ever meet Elend and Vin again? Will we see more prequels/off-spins to WoT? Do you plan a trip to Slovakia?

    Brandon Sanderson (14 November 2011)

    Elend and Vin have had their stories told. WoT spin-offs are unlikely. (Sorry.) I'd love to visit Slovakia.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    I'm actually reading a book about Slovakia right now, written by a friend who lived there. (It's called Vodnik.)

    Tags

  • 168

    Interview: Nov 21st, 2011

    Question

    How does compounding work in Mistborn?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I can explain this better in person because I know things that the characters in the book don’t. So, they haven’t worked a lot of this out. All the magic systems in my work are linked because the books all take place in the same universe. In Elantris, magic works by drawing symbols in the air. What actually happens is that when they draw a symbol, energy passes through it from another place (which is my get-out for the laws of thermodynamics) and the effect of that energy is moderated by the symbol. In one case it may become light, in another it may become fire. In Mistborn, the metals have a similar effect. The magic is not coming from the metal (even if some characters think it is). It is being drawn from the same place and moderated by the metal.

    In the case of Feruchemy, no energy is being drawn from this other place. So, you spend a week sick and store up the ability to heal. It’s a balanced system, basically obeying the laws of thermodynamics. So, while it’s not real, it’s still rational.

    In compounding, when you have the power of both Allomancy and Feruchemy, you draw power from the other place through the metal and it recognizes the power that is already stored—"Oh, this is healing, I know how to do that”—and so you get the power of Feruchemy but boosted by energy from the other place. This is how the Lord Ruler achieved immortality.

    Tags

  • 169

    Interview: Nov 21st, 2011

    Question

    Were Ruin and Preservation two shards or one?

    Brandon Sanderson

    They were two shards. Harmony is considered a shard, although it’s really two, in the same way that a king of two countries would still be considered a king.

    Tags

  • 170

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    Nolder ()

    My question has to do with Warbreaker 2 should you ever choose to write it. Will you be releasing it piece by piece and then in its entirety for free online like you did with WB1?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes, I will be.

    mgowen

    Wait... what!? We already have Warbreaker 1 to recommend to friends as a free trial of your work.

    Not that I'm complaining, but why make W2 free too?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Because it was a part of the experience of writing the book for me. It is something I'd like to try again. (Releasing the book chapter by chapter as I write it.)

    beetnemesis

    Was the Warbreaker experiment successful? By which I mean, were there more, less, or as many sales as, say, Elantris?

    Brandon Sanderson

    More than Elantris or MB1/MB2 initially, not as many as MB3. Now it's about even with Elantris. (Expected. Mistborn has the series boost, which makes the entire trilogy sell about double what Elantris or Warbreaker do.)

    Tags

  • 171

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    FirstRyder ()

    Which of the many fight scenes you have written would you most like to see done in film?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I wouldn't mind seeing the Kelsier/Inquistior confrontation in Mistborn done in film.

    Tags

  • 172

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    som1else ()

    Is Allriane really Cett's daughter? Skaa have to have Allomancy in the past six generations to get Allomancy and Cett says that she is the first person in their family to get Allomancy for centuries.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes, she is. Good thinking, though.

    Tags

  • 173

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    basstrace ()

    Is Sazed the "Seventeenth Shard", as referred to in the epigraphs of part two of The Way of Kings?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Those who are speaking about it below are leading you the right way. Sazed is not the Seventeeth Shard. Whether he's IN the Seventeenth Shard is another question. It is an organization.

    Tags

  • 174

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    Remagoen ()

    When plotting a series of books, how do you account for plot changes you didn't foresee you had to do? For instance, I read that Elend was originally going to be a minor character, but the end of Mistborn wouldn't have been the same without him. How did you work him into the plot later on without breaking the story?

    Brandon Sanderson

    After I wrote the first book, and Elend grew more important in my mind, I reworked the three-book-outline. Usually, when I build a series, I spend a lot of time on the first book and then have a few paragraphs on the rest. Then, after finishing the first book and seeing how it worked (and how the tone was) I go and do much more in-depth outlines for the rest of the series.

    When the first book is happening, things are much more 'anything goes' as I don't have any established cannon yet. I allow myself to toss the rest of the outlines out the window, and just try to make the first book the best it can be. From there, I have continuity, and I feel it is important to maintain that for the integrity of the series.

    Tags

  • 175

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    insertcleverphrase ()

    I know from reading your blog and various other comments that many of your books are in the same cosmos/universe, specifically Mistborn, Elantris, Warbreaker, and Way of Kings. I also am pretty sure that one day you'd like to do a series that ties all the different series/books together into one super-series. So my question is, would the various magic systems work on different worlds? For example, would a Mistborn be able to use his/her abilities in the world Way of Kings is located on?

    Brandon Sanderson

    It depends on the magic system. They are all related to a kind of "Spiritual DNA" that one gets from their heritage on a specific planet. However, there are ways around that. (Hemalurgy, for example, 'staples' a piece of someone else's soul to your own, and creates a work around to give you access to magic you shouldn't have.) Some of the magics are more regionally tied than others. (In Elantris, you have to access the Dor, which is very regionally influenced.)

    The end answer is this: With in-depth knowledge of how the magics work, and their connection, one could probably get them all to work on other planets. It may take effort for some of them.

    Tags

  • 176

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    ISw3arItWasntM3 ()

    What is your feelings regarding the reception of the ending to the Mistborn Trilogy? From my experience online it seems that this was the most heavily criticized part of the series.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Most of what I've heard has been positive, in a hesitant way. If someone is going to have a complaint, it's going to be about the ending. However, they usually admit it was the right ending in the same email or post. The bittersweet nature of it bothers many people, however.

    Tags

  • 177

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    Angry Caveman Lawyer ()

    How do you shape your heroes? To the plot or do you shape the plot to them? (I guess this is a which came first question...)

    Brandon Sanderson

    I usually design my plot in some detail before I begin. (Though not in as much detail as the world, which I spend a LOT of time on.) I build it using the idea of focus scenes—powerful, game-changing scenes that I imagine cinematically and then try to 'earn' though building my plot.

    Once that is done, I start my book with the characters. Characters, I grow organically. In writing terms, we speak of what we call "outline" writers and what we call "discovery" writers. (GRRM calls them "Architects" and "Gardeners.") I outline write my settings and to a lesser extent my plots, but I discovery write my characters.

    In doing so, once I start the book, the character takes center stage. They have, at any point, the right to change the plot in any way to fit what they would actually do. I will often try a few different 'characters' in a lead role when starting a book. For example, there were three different Vins I tried out for Mistborn. The first one (which was a boy) did not work. The second one (a female) did not work either. It was the third time that I got her right.

    Tags

  • 178

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    MindCanaries ()

    Why did you settle on a Nicrosil Misting for your second Mistborn trilogy? Did you consider any other types?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I considered others, but in the end this was one aspect of the magic system I hadn't explored yet but which is very important for the future of the series. I wanted to start establishing it.

    Tags

  • 179

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    RedBeardRaven ()

    This question is kind of multi leveled. I recently read that you are having both a game (pen and paper rpg/possibly video game later down the road) and movie of Mistborn come out/in the works. Would you be willing to expand the story(ies) in Mistborn to accommodate more installments? Are you willing to compromise things for the big corporation changes that normally come from this type of adaptations? If so, how/what?

    Brandon Sanderson

    For the video game, RPG, I am quite involved. In these, the goal is to expand on the world and story, not just retell the original trilogy. The video game, for example, will happen in the past of the world, closer to the founding of the Final Empire. As for the film, I am as involved as I can be—but that's not always very much, where the writer is concerned. I think the risk is worth the potential payoff, but it IS a risk. The film could be a terrible adaptation. I like the producer/screenwriter, however, and so far I've been very involved.

    Tags

  • 180

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    Yserbius ()

    Can we get your breakdown and opinion on the character development of Sazed and how you compare to him? I think he's one of the most philosophically interesting characters I have read in a while.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Getting Sazed right was actually quite hard for the last book. (The annotations speak in depth about this.) My first major revision of the book was to work on Sazed's character and personality in that novel. He and I think similarly in many ways, though he is far more emotional than I am. I have never had as serious a bout of depression as he faced in that book, though he and I have some similar perspectives on religion.

    Tags

  • 181

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    Ted Herman ()

    Do soothing and rioting work on a telepathic or physiological level (or both)?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Primarily telepathic, though the body does respond physiologically. After the Soother is gone, the emotion remains for a time, so long as it was a natural emotion. Strong soothing/riotings against a person's nature can wear off quickly, and the body react (sometimes) with a strong opposite emotion in response. A very good Soother/Rioter can inspire emotions that begin telepathic only, but then have a response in the body, so the emotion gets more cemented.

    Tags

  • 182

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    leaf25 ()

    Can you give us any updates on the (hopefully) upcoming Mistborn game? Same question for the movie deal you twitted about quite some time back.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Which one? Pen and paper RPG or video game?

    Pen and paper is done. Coming out this fall, probably. I am hoping to go to Gencon next year to support it.

    Video Game deal has not been signed yet, but contract negotiations are done and we should sign soon. I can give more details then.

    Movie deal: An actor for Vin has been tentatively attached, though it's very preliminary. Screenplay is done, and I got the latest draft in July. It's quite good.

    Tags

  • 183

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    Quafe ()

    You have, undoubtedly, mastered the fantasy genre. Do you ever see yourself writing science fiction? I ask because I remember reading two or three years ago on TWG that your plan is to make the second Mistborn trilogy set in a steampunk/industrialized world and the third and final trilogy in a more sci-fi setting. So I'm just wondering if that plan still holds.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Both of my novellas linked above are SF. I do plan to do SF in the future. The final Mistborn trilogy will indeed be sf, with a deep understanding of Allomancy and Feruchemy having allowed them to figure out a method of FTL travel. I also have a space opera I've been wanting to write. So far, no time.

    Tags

  • 184

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    Eric Lake ()

    Allomancy provides many very dramatic effects, which some have noted is not very much like Preservation. Could you walk me through how Allomancy is of Preservation, though it does dramatic, dynamic things?

    Brandon Sanderson

    One of the 'basics' of the magic in all of the worlds is that the energy of Shards can fuel all kinds of interactions, not just interactions based on their personality/role. I did this because otherwise, the Magics would all be extremely limited.

    The 'role' of the Shard has to do with the WAY the magic is obtained, not what it can do. So, in Preservation's case, the magic is a gift—allowing a person to preserve their own strength, and rely upon the strength granted by the magic. While Hemalurgy has a huge cost, ending in net entropy.

    Tags

  • 185

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    Eric Lake ()

    I'm curious whether there is a deeper significance here than Preservation simply needing to be Ruin's opposite.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes, there is, but I can't talk about it now.

    Tags

  • 186

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    Eric Lake ()

    It's a little odd that Preservation would inherently give up its power to fuel Allomancy, because you'd think he would preserve himself, you know? Does that make sense?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Preservation, as a Shard, is about preserving life, people, and the like. Not about self. No more than Ruin is about destroying self, or Cultivation is about growing herself.

    Tags

  • 187

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    sblinn ()

    Is The Alloy of Law something that someone who has not read the previous Mistborn novels will feel lost in, or is it a place that new readers can jump into the world?

    Brandon Sanderson

    It was written as a new place people can enter. It has only slight spoilers for the original trilogy, most of which a new reader won't realize are spoilers until they've read the original trilogy.

    Tags

  • 188

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    nomoreink ()

    Why do you feel Mistborn: The Final Empire was successful when there are hundreds (maybe even thousands) of other fantasy novels out there that failed?

    Brandon Sanderson

    1) Biggest factor, luck. I'm not the best writer out there. Better writers have had less success. I got lucky. 2) I am a big fan of the genre, and feel that I understood (not intentionally, but just because of what I was) the frustrations of epic fantasy readers with things not happening in the genre. I naturally wrote books that went different ways, and these drew attention. 3) Enough of a personal stamp to stand out.

    Tags

  • 189

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    frodo lives ()

    Because of the way the third Mistborn novel ended... How do your religious beliefs, whatever they might be, play into your writing? (which makes me squeal like a fan girl I might add).

    Brandon Sanderson

    I've answered this question in part above. In a deeper answer, in regards to the way MB3 ended, some of what I personally believe made an appearance because of my similarity to Sazed as a person.

    Tags

  • 190

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    Renian ()

    When will we see a book that basically revolves around the concept of the Cosmere and the shard-travelers? Basically, a book revolving around people like Hoid who can jump from shard to shard.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Third Mistborn Trilogy involves a lot of this. I MIGHT do some parallel stories showing more of what Hoid has been up to. He is a primary viewpoint protagonist of Dragonsteel, but that happens before all of the other books.

    Tags

  • 191

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    Renian ()

    Why sell the movie rights to Mistborn to a relatively unknown producer? I get that they understand your vision for the movie and know how they want to be done, but I kind of think that other people in the movie industry would have been able to make your vision a reality so long as you were a consultant for the movie, and it would be more likely to see the light of day.

    Brandon Sanderson

    When I sold the rights, I was not of the level of fame I now am. That's one consideration. It was the first REAL (as in, willing to up-front serious money) offer I'd had. I also knew that Red Eagle had had success with the WoT, being small and then getting the rights picked up by a large studio.

    The producer impressed me a lot. He flew out to meet with me, and had a great vision. My agent and I thought that, getting a deal with a smaller producer and retaining some creative control was worth the risk. The worst that can happen is that a buyout doesn't happen by the end of next year, and the rights come back.

    Tags

  • 192

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    crucix ()

    Do you have any plans for companions to any of your book series?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I will do a Stormlight book eventually. There is a Mistborn pen and paper RPG coming out later this year which will cover a lot of that for Mistborn.

    Tags

  • 193

    Interview: Nov 10th, 2011

    Question

    You mentioned in your newsletter that you were thinking of doing a Mistborn film, and I'm wondering because it's an internal magic system, how you would differentiate which metal was being burned?

    Brandon Sanderson

    We've got a couple of tricks up our sleeve that we've been working on. One thing that we're changing in the screenplay is, when you burn iron and steel it makes metals glow blue rather than shooting out blue lines. Basically this will keep it less cluttered, and you can kind of dim the screen a little bit and show everything glowing blue. We're doing that, and when you start burning one of the, for instance, one of the metals that influences personality, we're gonna actually kind of like send a pulse out of the person, and have it kind of wash across people, and things like that, so we're coming up with visual clues to show them.

    Tags

  • 194

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    Dovienya ()

    I'm not going to waste Brandon's time with this—maybe someone else can answer.

    Regarding the ending of the Mistborn Trilogy: What was up with Ruin having red hair? Is that significant? Does it mean that Ruin was originally a human who gained his powers somehow? My friend thought that Ruin was actually another red-haired character in the series, though I don't remember his name. I think he was a minor captain or something.

    (My apologies for how vague this is—it's been a while since I read the series)

    Phaz

    That is on the right track. Do some reading up on Adonalsium and the Cosmere if you are interested.

    Dovienya

    Will do, but I have to be honest—there is something off putting about having to do internet research to truly understand the ending of a book/series.

    Brandon Sanderson

    I try to make all of the cosmere stuff "bonus material" so to speak. I don't think it's essential to understanding Mistborn to know Ruin's origin. Those who want expanded information can find it, and theorize upon it. However, I intend to warn people up-front before writing any book where you have to know this to understand it.

    Within the realm of Mistborn only, all you really need to know is that someone was holding this power—and that the 'individuals' of Ruin and Preservation were people, changed by the power they held. It holds to the theme of the story, with what happens regarding Sazed and other characters.

    Tags

  • 195

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    alanthiana ()

    Allomancy is such a unique form of magic, in the fantasy realm of books. What was your inspiration in forming it?

    Brandon Sanderson

    A mix of many things inspired Allomancy. The 'feel' of a magic that was really just a new branch of physics, as I spoke about in another post. Alchemy, which is fascinating to me from the standpoint of its place on the border, is another. Real scientists believed in Alchemy, but had to sort out that it was not scientific. It was a time of great thought, and a time when science and 'magic' were mixed in what now seems like strange ways.

    Dune was an inspiration (having a limited resource, though I didn't limit it nearly as much, to give an economic side to the magic.) Vector physics was a big influence, as was the fact that I wanted to write a heist story. I therefore designed powers that worked for thieves. The 'burning' of metals was chosen because it resonated with science—the basic way we gain energy is by ingesting things and breaking them down for chemical energy. I wanted something that felt like it had one foot in science, but was also very magical.

    Tags

  • 196

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    alanthiana ()

    Allomancy can be such an internal form of magic... how would you see it being dealt with visually, if Mistborn were ever to have a TV/movie version?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Pushes and Pulls are going to be done (if this version of the film gets made) by having metals glow blue when an Allomancer is using their powers. There will be visual or auditory cues for the other powers as well.

    Tags

  • 197

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    shdwfeather ()

    One of the things I really like about your books is the creative and immersive backdrop that the stories take place in. I know you spend a lot of time (and words!) on the background material for these worlds. Will you ever publish your world-building notes?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I'd like to someday. The reason I haven't yet is because many of them contain cosmere-related notes that give huge spoilers for other books. I could just expunge those, but I feel it better to let things grow a little more and then do some worldbooks. The Mistborn RPG coming out this year is half worldbook, though, and has a lot of setting information from my notes.

    Tags

  • 198

    Interview: Aug 31st, 2011

    Reddit AMA 2011 (Verbatim)

    Khobra ()

    I was wondering if you could talk a little bit about your creative process for designing magic systems. Do you have an idea for a story and then make the magic based around that? Do you have an idea for a system and then try and build stories that work around the system? How does designing the story world play into the process? When you're designing the system itself do you start off by figuring out what you want the end result to be and then work towards it, or is it the other way around?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I've done it all of these ways.

    Most commonly, I develop the magic, plot, characters, and some setting ideas separately. I combine them in my head, looking for good synergy. (Allomancy and Feruchemy were designed separately, then put into the same book.) Sometimes, I design to fit a story. (Hemalurgy was designed to fit a hole in the three-fold magic system I wanted to tell.) Other times, the magic comes first, then I build everything out of that. (This happened for my YA book Scribbler—also known as The Rithmatist—which isn't out yet.)

    Tags

  • 199

    Interview: Nov 10th, 2011

    Question

    I’ve always wondered what Atium looks like when you’re burning it, do you have possible things coming out of you or do have one shadow just walking out or like an accordion of shadows?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I see one shadow that bursts out that leaves a trail, so like a really faint blur, and then the one shadow in the front, for each...and yeah, if you've got like two Atiums then it's a whole bunch of those, but I see one shadow with a blur of all the pieces and things behind it.

    Tags

  • 200

    Interview: Dec 5th, 2011

    Helen Lowe

    The Alloy of Law is newly out and returns to Scadrial, the world of your Mistborn trilogy, but rather than the medieval milieu of high fantasy, instead comprises a late 19th century world of steam trains and industry. This sounds like steampunk, but The Alloy of Law is also very much a "western" in feel, with a former gun-toting Roughs (Wild West) lawman, Wax, returning to the urban metropolis—yet still ending up fighting the bad guys with his wise-cracking buddy, Wayne. So was that fun to do, blending the genres? And what led you to explore that path with your Mistborn world?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I've said that what I love about fantasy is that it can do anything any other genre can do, plus have that added sense of wonder. So I've wanted to explore different types of what fantasy can achieve. The steampunk movement is awesome for doing this. I don't actually consider this book to be steampunk, because the Victorian feel and steam technology aren't there, but it certainly is a cousin to what is happening in steampunk.

    At its core, really what I've done is write a detective novel. A buddy detective novel set in an early 1900s industrial age equivalent, in a fantasy world where the epic fantasy that I wrote as a trilogy (Mistborn) has become the mythology for this new world. That concept excited me. What made me do it? The idea that I could, and that I hadn't really seen it done before. That's what fantasy is all about.

    Tags

  • 201

    Interview: Dec 5th, 2011

    Helen Lowe

    Magic systems are a strong part of both the Mistborn books, with their allomancy and feruchemy, but also of the Stormlight world, with its fabrials, shardblades and voidbinding. Do you spend a lot of time developing the magic system before you begin writing, or does it tend to evolve with the story?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I spend a lot of hours ahead of time on my magic systems. I am a planner when it comes to worldbuilding. Of course, everything's going to evolve as you work on a book—nothing can be planned out perfectly; there needs to be some freedom, some improvisation to really bring life to it. But I do plan things out a lot, specifically my magic systems. This is a big focus to me, partially because it's become one of my big calling cards in the genre. It lets me add something different, my own take. Granted I'm not the only one who does interesting magic systems, but it has become one of the hallmarks of my writing, and so that's fine with me because it's something that I love to do.

    Tags

  • 202

    Interview: Nov, 2009

    Brandon Sanderson

    During the era when I was trying to find my voice and find out what I was going to do as a writer, I felt that Robert Jordan had really captured the story of the hero's journey, the monomyth type epic fantasy, and done it about as well as it could be done. And so I started to look for things that I could add. This was very good for me to be doing, to be spending this time thinking about, not just retreading what had gone before, but really doing what some of the greats in the past had done.

    One of the reasons I love the Wheel of Time is because I felt that when it came out, it best blended what was familiar about fantasy with a lot of new concepts. A lot of the books that were coming out were using the old familiar tropes: elves, even if they called them a different name, and dwarves, and even dragons, and these sorts of things. And then you came along to the Wheel of Time, which didn't use any of those things, or if it did, it twisted them completely on their head. No one knew what a dragon was, and a dragon was a person. And you know, the magic system having a logical approach to it rather than just being something that happened. And he really took the genre in a different direction. And I said, I have to do something like this. Not that I ever wanted to, or intend to, or think that I could be revolutionary in the genre in the way he was, but I wanted to add something. I wanted to take a step forward rather than taking the same steps that people had taken.

    And so I began to ask myself what hadn't been done. And so you end up with me, Brandon, who...sometimes I look at myself as a postmodern fantasy writer. If you read the Mistborn trilogy, it's very much a postmodern fantasy epic. It's the fantasy epic for someone who's read all these great fantasy epics. And the story's kind of aware of all of those. It's the story of what happens if the dark lord wins? What happens if the prophecies are lies? What happens if all the things we assume about the standard fantasy epic all go horribly wrong?

    I don't want to simply be someone. . . to be postmodern, you have to be a little bit deconstructionalist, which means you're relying on the very things that you're tearing apart. I think there's a level beyond that, which is actually adding something new, not just giving commentary on what's come before. But I do love the whole postmodern aspect. I love delving into that. It's something that I think can be unique to my generation because we've grown up reading all these epics, where the generation before us didn't.

    Tags

  • 203

    Interview: Jan 18th, 2010

    Chris

    I've seen in reviews of Mistborn that a criticsm that pops up from time to time is that you tend to repeat the basic principles of the magic system. I've seen that some feel hit over the head with it. Personally, I liked that fact since the magic system was new and it helped me to remember and understand.

    I'm also seeing criticsm now with Warbreaker that the magic system isn't explained enough to thoroughly understand it. I've pointed out in discussions that not even Vasher understands it all.

    But here's my question: Did criticsm of the magic system's explanations in Mistborn have anything to do with Warbreaker having considerably less explanation in its magic system?"

    Brandon Sanderson (Goodreads)

    Wow, that's a very detailed and interesting question. The answer is no.

    ...Okay, there's more to that answer. I accepted the criticisms of the Mistborn books with the knowledge that there was really no other way around it—the way I was writing those books and the complexity of the magic system made me feel like I needed to give those hints. It's not like I'm trying to write down to the lowest denominator, but at the same time I want to make sure that the complicated magic system is a force driving the book—and is something interesting rather than something confusing. Across a three-book epic like that I wanted to make sure that I was not leaving people behind. That's always a balance in a book series. And I don't know where to set that balance. In fact, I think the balance is going to be different for every person. Any given book that you read, some people are going to find it overexplained and some people are going to find it underexplained. I'm always trying to strike the right balance, particularly for the tone of a given book, to make that work for the novel.

    With Warbreaker, as you've pointed out, the magic system is much less understood by the poeple taking part in it. In the Mistborn books the magic system is very well understood. Even though there are little pieces of it that people don't know yet, those peices are easy to grasp and understand and use once people figure out what they are. In the Mistborn books the world is in a state where people have spend 1000 years using this magic system and perfecting it and understanding it. In Warbreaker, they haven't. They still don't know much about what's going on. It's very mysticized. People haven't sat down and spent enough time pursuing scholarly research about it, figuring it out. Beyond that there's no immortal Lord Ruler figure explaining it all to them—or if there is, it's Vasher and he's not telling anyone. And so the magic in Warbreaker has a very different feel to it. I wanted it to be a little confusing, because it is confusing for the main characters.

    I wouldn't say that the criticism of the Mistborn books is what drove me; the needs of the various plots is what drove me.

    Tags

  • 204

    Interview: Jan 18th, 2010

    Emji

    While I loved Mistborn and am excited to see you optioned the film rights already, I think that Warbreaker would translate to film even more easily/successfully

    So I guess my question is, do you agree that Warbreaker will translate to film better? Did you discuss this with the Paloppa Guys? Which of your works do you think is most "marketable" as a medium—to—big—budget film?

    Brandon Sanderson (Goodreads)

    I think the magic system of Warbreaker is certainly better suited to film than a lot of the MISTBORN magic system. However, I think the plot and storytelling of Mistborn — because of the action/adventure style of it — would translate better to film. Story structure—wise, Mistborn, particularly the first book, is probably the best book-to-film translation I think I've got. I think Warbreaker would make a wonderful graphic novel, and someday I would love to sell rights to it in that medium. And certainly if we make a Mistbron film, the metals would have to work in a very different way. They would probably be understated in the film itself.

    Tags

  • 205

    Interview: Jan 18th, 2010

    Christina

    My question: What exactly does the Mistborn sequel series entail?

    Brandon Sanderson (Goodreads)

    Several hundred years after the original trilogy—Spoiler alert!—Wait, aren't these questions supposed to be about Warbreaker?

    Anyway, the Mistborn sequel trilogy, as I've said before, takes place in a more technologically advanced version of the world, several hundred years later. They've progressed beyond steam technology to combustion engine technology, are building skyscrapers ;mdash; that level of technology. It will follow the exploits of a team of Allomancers who are kind of like an Allomantic SWAT team, a group of hybrid mercenary/deputized individuals who are brought in by the police to take out Allomancer criminals. The first book will deal with when they are called in to deal with a Mistborn serial killer. That's how it starts. It will go bizarre from there, of course, but think guns, cars, skyscrapers, and Allomancers.

    Footnote

    This trilogy that he's talking about is after the Alloy of Law.

    Tags

  • 206

    Interview: Jul 22nd, 2011

    Shawn Speakman

    Your next Mistborn book comes out in November.

    Brandon Sanderson

    In November, yes.

    Shawn Speakman

    Excellent. Why don't you tell us a little about it, and how you came to create it?

    Brandon Sanderson

    When I pitched the Mistborn series to Tor, I pitched it as a continuum, as a group of different smaller series set in a fantasy world that I... I had never seen it done before. That doesn't mean it hasn’t been done. Lots of things have been done. But I had never seen a series do a big epic fantasy trilogy, and then jump forward hundreds of years and have the technology have grown and changed. It seems like when we jump around in fantasy worlds, we're always kind of in the same tech level, and I wanted to do something different; I wanted to write this... The Mistborn trilogy is done and tied up, and it is an epic fantasy trilogy—I love how it turned out. Now I'm jumping forward hundreds of years and doing stories in the same world, with the magic still being around during the age of industry. And so this is a... This is guns and skyscrapers and cars and allomancers. Right about...equivalency of early 1900s. And so it's the dawn of electric power, and the dawn of motor cars and things like this. Kind of a clash between magic and the technology, and a guy who's kind of caught between the two.

    Shawn Speakman

    This sounds standalone-ish. Like a new person to Mistborn could actually jump into it and...

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes, it's definitely a new jumping in point. It does not have major spoilers for the previous series. So it's one you can just read, and the first chapters are on Tor.com. We're pushing the... We're publishing the first five on the website, so people can just go read them there.

    Shawn Speakman

    Will you be touring?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I will be. I'll be doing a tour in the US and in the UK.

    Shawn Speakman

    Because the Wheel of Time book will be turned in?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes. The Wheel of Time book is turned in, and then I go on tour.

    Shawn Speakman

    Excellent.

    Tags

  • 207

    Interview: Jun 11th, 2007

    Kaimi Wenger

    You're currently annotating Mistborn on your blog, providing "deleted scenes" and commentary on each chapter of the book. What are the advantages of this approach? How much time does it take? Why did you decide to start annotating?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Well, I do these things kind of for the same reasons I mentioned above. First and foremost, I want people to feel like they get their money's worth from my novels. When they buy one—particularly in hardback—they're investing quite a chunk of change to be entertained. I want to give them as much as I can, kind of like the bonus material on a DVD.

    It takes between a half-hour and an hour a day, four days a week, to keep my blog updated and to provide this bonus material. A fairly big investment, but worth it, I think. I go a year between publishing novels. If I can keep people coming back to my website to read new and good material, they'll be that much more likely to know when my next book comes out, then buy it!

    The annotations came from my desire to do something like a DVD director's commentary. I'd never seen anything like that done on a book website before, so I went for it. I hope people enjoy them!

    Tags

  • 208

    Interview: Jun 11th, 2007

    Frank McIntyre

    Mistborn was good. Elantris was better, I think. I have a pretty low tolerance for sex and gore in novels and neither of these bothered me. Both were very interesting fantasy that actually spent some time thinking about new ways a world could work.

    JOHNNA CORNETT

    Oh Frank, Mistborn is much better than Elantris, but then I'm prejudiced against zombies. And as an added bonus, Mistborn had the best cover art ever—that unusual angle, so intriguing, and not contra the text as book covers so often are. In fact, after I finished the book I could see, in retrospect, that the cover depicts an important plot point at the end of the book—what a fabulous Easter egg is that!

    It's fun that my oldest child is now old enough to pass my books too. We both love Mistborn. No undue influence from the woman who houses and feeds her, I assume. She wrote one of her big literature projects on Mistborn this year.

    Brandon Sanderson

    The Elantris vs Mistborn debate: To be honest, I expected this. The books are actually rather different. I think the same audience will enjoy them both, but I fully expect some readers to like the philosophy and metaphorical nature of Elantris, while others will like the action of Mistborn. Just wait until Alcatraz hits—it's quite different too, and I don't know what people are going to think of it.

    Tags

  • 209

    Interview: Jan 18th, 2010

    zas678

    Also, would the Elantrians and the Lerasium-mistings be considered Slivers? Or is just the Lord Ruler and Vin Slivers (Via the Well)? Or do you need more power to be considered a Sliver?

    Brandon Sanderson (Goodreads)

    Elantrians are not slivers. Mistborn trilogy spoiler warnings follow! The Lord Ruler was indeed a Sliver. So was Vin. For the rest, I would say probably not.

    What defines an actual Sliver of Adonalsium is not as clear-cut as you might think. It's a term that in-universe people who study this have applied to various existences and states. Every single person on the world of Scadrial has a bit of Leras in them—a bit of the power of Preservation. Every single person has a bit of Ati in them. There's a certain threshold where these scholars would call you a Sliver of Adonalsium. But I would say that any regular Misting is probably not a Sliver. A full Lerasium Mistborn is getting closer, but people who have held one of the powers are what would probably be termed a Sliver by the definitions. If you hold all the power that makes you a Shard, but the Lord Ruler held a little bit of it and then let it go. From then on they referred to that change in him—the residue, what was left—as a Sliver. When he held it he became the Shard for a short time, and Vin was a Shard for a short time. After Vin gave up the power, what Kelsier is at the end of the trilogy—that's a Sliver of Adonalsium.

    Tags

  • 210

    Interview: Dec 17th, 2011

    Question

    Will there be an Alloy of Law sequel?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes. But probably not till A Memory of Light (coming out in October-November 2012) and Stormlight 2 (coming out in April-March 2013) come out.

    Tags

  • 211

    Interview: Dec 17th, 2011

    Brandon Sanderson

    The Inquisitor at the end is indeed Marsh. He stayed alive using the same trick that TLR used.

    ZAS

    I said that I actually had a related question.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    He said "Oh, do you want to ask why Marsh has a Feruchemical Atium spike?"

    ZAS

    I blinked, and said that my question was actually "Why did Bloody Tan see Ten-Soon (as the Survivor) and Marsh (as Ironeyes)?"

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    He said that he was not answering any questions on what Bloody Tan saw, or thought he saw.

    ZAS

    I then said, "But now that you mention it, why does Marsh have a Feruchemical Atium spike?"

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    He told me "You'll have to figure that out! Good job on getting two RAFOs in a row!"

    Tags

  • 212

    Interview: Dec 15th, 2011

    Zas (Chaos)

    Got another one. Why do Kandra need two spikes to have a blessing and to become sentient?

    Brandon Sanderson

    It is just the nature of how Hemalurgy works. More spikes are capable of changing form and body more, and I didn’t feel that one spike was viable for the alterations that are made to their nature.

    Tags

  • 213

    Interview: Dec 15th, 2011

    Zas

    Could you make a Kandra an Allomancer?

    Brandon Sanderson

    With the right sequence of sorts of things, you could impart those powers to them theoretically. It’s not likely to happen, but you could do it. You could build a spike that would let them Push or Pull. But you’d give the powers separately, probably.

    Tags

  • 214

    Interview: Dec 15th, 2011

    Question

    I've heard rumors of a Mistborn movie. Is that true?

    Brandon Sanderson

    The Mistborn movie, is not even up to handshakes now. We do have a Vin chosen, but it’s not official yet, so I can’t say who it is.

    QUESTION

    I've heard rumors. Will you confirm or deny this?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    What rumor?

    QUESTION

    Linsey Lohan?

    (Wild laughter)

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Yeah, I can deny that one. (Continued Laughter) It's not Paris Hilton's dog either.

    Yeah, basically it’s where it’s been at for a while, which is we’re at a good version of the screenplay, we’re trying now to get people to look at it in Hollywood.

    Tags

  • 215

    Interview: Dec 15th, 2011

    Brandon Sanderson

    The video game is coming along very nicely. In fact, earlier just this week I built the whole plot sequence for that. It’s going to have some really good twists and turns and theoretically, if it works well, I will be writing all the dialogue and all the story.

    Member of Audience

    Which is more on your plate.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Which is more on my plate. But that can be fun, because the main character is a really sarcastic kind of a little bit of a jerk. And so I can actually write his dialogue on napkins while I’m sitting, waiting and be like “Alright, here’s a good line,” and things like that. That’s because most of it is gameplay. I have to just come up with lots of good wisecracks and then of course, I have to write the cutscenes. But those really aren’t that much in a game like this. It’s maybe a week’s worth of work to get all of that written.

    Zas

    How long before is the game going to be? I remember you saying it was going to be before Final Empire, but I was wondering how long before?

    Brandon Sanderson

    We are shooting for second century after The Lord Ruler's Ascension.

    Tags

  • 216

    Interview: Dec 15th, 2011

    Question

    What is a Mistcloak made of in real life? Like what is the closest material you’ve seen one be made of? Because I’m having the hardest time figuring out what material to use.

    Brandon Sanderson

    The Mistcloak is mainly made of cool stuff in my head that moves in ways that’s very hard to make. (laughter) But I would say the key component to the mistcloak is how it falls. And a lot of people have tried to use the stuff that has the wires at the sides of it, and I don’t actually think that works right. I would say that the key to the Mistcloak is getting it to fall kind of straight , but the tassles not being too stiff. So I would look for a medium weight material. So, I don’t even know what, but felt isn’t right. I’ve seen some people do felt, and it doesn’t look right. Felt’s too heavy.

    I’ve seen good Mistcloaks, but I don’t know fabrics enough to say for sure. I’d have to have it before me and say “Yes” to this, or “No” to this.

    MEMBER OF AUDIENCE

    Congratulations. Now he’s going to make up a new magic system. (laughter)

    Tags

  • 217

    Interview: Dec 15th, 2011

    Question

    How do you pronounce the Mistborn Planet? [Scadrial]

    Brandon Sanderson

    Sca (as in Scab) dri (as in drink) al (sounds like ul).

    MEMBER OF AUDIENCE

    Okay. I always said Sca (as in Skate) dri (as in drink) al (as in Albert)

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    That’s perfectly fine. This can launch me into my little thing on pronunciation. As readers, you get the say, you’re the director. I wrote the script. The director can always change things. If you want a character to look differently in your head, that’s okay. If you want to pronounce things however you want, that’s okay too. Because a book does not exist until it has a reader. It really doesn’t live. It exists, but it doesn’t live until you read it and give it life. So however you feel like doing it, go ahead. And remember, I’ve said this numerous times before, I don’t pronounce all the names right. I’m American, so I pronounce things with an American accent. The best example I give is Kelsier, because I do say Kel (as in bell) si (as in see) er (as in air), but they say Kel (as in bell) si (as in see) er (as in hey) in-world (it sounds very French). I say E (as in the letter e) lan (as in lawn) tris (as in hiss), they say E (as in the letter e) Lan (as in lane) tris (as in hiss) in-world. So there are linguistic fundamentals of these because I do have some linguistic background, but I don’t always say them right. I like saying Sa (like suh) rene (like Reen), instead of Sa (like suh) rene (like meany), which is how they say it. Which Suh-reany sounds kind of dumb in English. And in their language, it’s a beautiful woman’s name, but here you wouldn’t call someone Suh-reany, you’d call them Suh-rean.

    Tags

  • 218

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    kqrpnb

    Brandon, how do you think The Way of Kings will read as a complete set with your voice in the last books? Did you plan ahead for that?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Short answer is yes. We’ll see if I can pull it off. Original plans for my series was for a 36 book arc. I thought that would intimidate readers. But the secret answer is this: People ask for an Elantris sequel. There is one. It is called Mistborn.

    Tags

  • 219

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    rhPieces

    Elantris and Mistborn had darker settings, Warbreaker lighter. Where does The Way of Kings fall?

    Closer to Mistborn.

    Tags

  • 220

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    jeremy208

    Can we expect any short stories set in the Warbreaker world anytime soon?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Short stories in Warbreaker world are unlikely. I’m working on some Mistborn ones, though. If I were going to do more Warbreaker, I’d just write the sequel, Nightblood.

    Tags

  • 221

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    pfchristopher

    Why didn't Vin know the Atium bead Zane gave her wasn't real? Cant she sense how big reserves are?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Atium reserves always look bigger than they are to an allomancer. It burns so quickly. She just didn’t have enough experience with atium to realize she’d been duped.

    Tags

  • 222

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    mnehring

    How did you come up with what metal would give what powers in Mistborn?

    Brandon Sanderson

    The metals just worked out right. [later] I see I misunderstood. The assignment of metals to powers was done mostly randomly. I started by trying to mix and match colors and hues, but that ended up not working. I also originally wanted the physical to be more common, and then move toward less common with mental and others. Hence, iron is physical, Gold is mental, [sic] Atium is temporal. The mentals don’t quite fit this, though.

    Tags

  • 223

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    King_Yoshi

    How did you come up with the amazing plot twist at the end of Hero of Ages?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Honestly, I did it by plotting out all three books at once. It feels right because I’d been planning all along.

    Tags

  • 224

    Interview: Nov 8th, 2011

    Question

    Does Iron store mass or weight?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Excellent question. The thing is it really does involve mass, but I’m breaking some physics rules, basically. I have to break a number of physics rules in order to make Magic work in the first place. Those whole laws of Thermodynamics, I’m like “You are my bane!” (laughter) But I try to work within the framework, and I have reasonings built up for myself, and some of them have to be kind of arbitrary. But the thing is, it does store mass if you look at how it interacts, but when a Feruchemist punches someone, you’re not having a mass transference of a 1000 pounds transferring the mass into someone else.

    So there are a few little tweaks. You can go talk to Peter, because Peter has the actual math. Oh Peter’s back there. Peter is dressed up as Allomancer Jak from the broadsheet. In fact we’re giving some out broadsheets, aren’t we Peter. So when you come through the line, we’re giving out Broadsheets. Please don’t take fifty—I think we might have enough for everybody. The broadsheets are the newspaper from the Alloy of Law time. It’s an inworld newspaper. It’s actually reproduced in the book in four different pages, and we put it together in one big broadsheet.

    So anyway, you can talk with him, he’s got more of the math of it. I explained the concept to Peter and he’s better with the actual math, so he said “We’ll figure it out.”

    Tags

  • 225

    Interview: Nov 8th, 2011

    Question

    When will we see a Hoid book?

    Brandon Sanderson

    It’ll be a little while. He’s playing around with things in the Stormlight Archive if you couldn’t tell, he’s decided to—Hoid is fiddling with things, more than he usually does. But Hoid as a major part of things doesn’t really show up till the third Mistborn trilogy, which is the outer space Mistborn, the sci-fi Mistborn.

    If you didn’t know, Mistborn was pitched to my editor as a trilogy of trilogies. I told him I wanted to do a trilogy of epic fantasy books, then the same world in a modern setting, which we’re not to yet, but it’s going to be Allomancers in the 21st century-equivalent technology. It’s an urban fantasy series. Then I wanted to do a Science Fiction series in the same world, using the Epic Fantasy world as kind of a mythology to this new world, and the magic system becoming the means of Space Travel.

    MEMBER OF AUDIENCE

    Whaaa?!

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    And so that’s how I pitched Mistborn to my editor.

    Alloy of Law is actually a deviation from that, because I didn’t want people to forget about Mistborn, I wanted them to keep reading Mistborn, so I wanted them to keep releasing things, and we’ll eventually get to that second trilogy—

    Hey there you are Mark! I heard you got number one.

    MARK

    Yep.

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    You’re crazy (laughter). You’re awesome though. He even beat the 17thshard people, which is really a hard thing to do. (oohs and aahs) Two hours. Beat them by two hours.

    So Alloy of Law I wanted to set up things for the second trilogy. I didn’t want to do the second trilogy yet, because the second trilogy, like the first trilogy is kind of bigger books, with a very involved storyline evolved across three books, and I didn’t want to be releasing that parallel to Stormlight Archive, which is the same sort of thing. Very evolved books where you tie a lot of things together, and so I wanted a series of Mistborn novels that were more independent.

    Alloy of Law is intended to be a “read it, have fun.” Eventually I may end up doing more with those characters, but when I do, you won’t have to remember that much about this one. It’s not like you have to remember a cast of 500 characters. You can just keep track of the main characters. They’re more of an episodic adventure. I kind of imagine Alloy of Law being—I’m not totally sure how to describe it. It’s like you have the giant movie that comes out, and then you have a TV show that’s based off of it, and then another big movie series, or something like that, if that makes any sense.

    So that’s what Alloy of Law is. So Hoid is very involved in the third Mistborn trilogy, he’s also very involved in Dragonsteel, which is actually the first book in the sequence, long before Elantris happened. So eventually I will tell that story. You can read a draft of it at the BYU library. It’s the only copy that I know of in existence. It’s almost always checked out. It’s my Honors thesis, and it’s not very good. It really is not very good, but basically it’s involving the ideas that eventually will become Dragonsteel once I write it again. But I stole the Shattered Plains and put them in Roshar instead because the fit better there.

    Tags

  • 226

    Interview: Nov 8th, 2011

    Question

    How many Feruchemical powers have you revealed in the Alloy of Law?

    Brandon Sanderson

    In the Ars Arcanum in the back, I have revealed them all. I have not explained them all. (laughter), But I have revealed them all, they are in the back, so you are free to theorize what they mean.

    Tags

  • 227

    Interview: Nov 8th, 2011

    Question

    What the heck is Investiture?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I’m not going to say that because it would be a spoiler for those who haven’t read the Ars Arcanum yet.

    Tags

  • 228

    Interview: Nov 8th, 2011

    Question

    With the Alloy of Law being more Steampunk-style, and your genre of choice being fantasy, what things have you done differently in this book than in your previous ones?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Just a quick caveat—I don’t really view Alloy of Law as being Steampunk, but they put goggles on the cover, because Steampunk’s really popular, but I don’t view it as being Steampunk because it doesn’t fit the Victorian feel. It’s much more Edwardian, it’s later era, the book is really based off of 1910 New York, the feel and the culture that is there, but it’s really a Mistborn book. I think when you read it, you’ll feel that it’s more a Mistborn book than it is a Steampunk, or a Western, or anything else. It’s Mistborn. It’s Allomancers with Guns instead. (laughter)

    So what have I done differently? I really wanted it to feel like a Mistborn book, with some new elements. It’s really more of a Sherlock Holmes feel than anything else, because I wanted the mystery feel, and I wanted the character dynamic deal with things like that, so this was just a conscious choice to have two or three compelling main characters be in a more episodic story, and I was more focused on that than if it’s Steampunk, or whether this is what, I really want this thematically to feel like a Mistborn book.

    Tags

  • 229

    Interview: Nov 8th, 2011

    Question

    How did you come up with the Mistborn idea?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Boy, there’s so many different places this came from. The plot came from me wanting to tell a story about a world where the hero failed. You know, the Hero’s Journey a thousand years later, the sort of “What if Frodo had kept the ring?” or “What if Voldemort had killed Harry Potter?” That was one of my big concepts for it. Another big foundational concept was the desire to do a heist story, because I really love those, and I want to do one in the fantasy world.

    Tags

  • 230

    Interview: Nov 8th, 2011

    KChan

    These are things that I overheard.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Kelsier was not spiked.

    Part of the Lord Ruler's motivation for setting up The Final Empire was revenge against the people he viewed as encroaching on his people's land. He was also obsessed with creating order, which Ruin later exploited.

    The Ars Arcanum in the books were all written by one person.

    The author of the Ars Arcanum is either Hoid or a member of the Seventeenth Shard. Brandon also pointed to an annotation on the map of Elendel that's relevant to this question.

    There's just the one system in Warbreaker, and it's also a world with only one Shard on it.

    Tags

  • 231

    Interview: Nov 8th, 2011

    Zas678

    These are things that I overhead.

    Are the usual quadrants (Physical, Mental, Temporal, Enhancement) preserved in Feruchemy and Hemalurgy?

    Brandon Sanderson.

    No. In Ferchemy, it is based Realmatically. There is a quadrant of Spiritual, a quadrant of Cognitive and two quadrants of Physical.

    Tags

  • 232

    Interview: Nov 8th, 2011

    Zas678

    How do Kandra decide gender? Is it just intellectual? Or are there subtle physical differences?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Kandra have a specific gender that is associated with scent- you can tell if a kandra is a boy or girl depending on how they smell. There is more to it than that. They also know who they are attracted to.

    Tags

  • 233

    Interview: Nov 8th, 2011

    zas678

    Does the person being pierced in order to charge a Hemalurgic spike have to die?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Not necessarily. A spike does require you to rip pieces of a soul from the victim, but that does not mean they must die. They would be a very different person afterwords though.

    Tags

  • 234

    Interview: Nov 8th, 2011

    Zas678

    The following are quotes from Brandon that he wrote in books.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Far from the Central Dominance, skaa can hold land and get rich. The Lord Ruler doesn't let this be known.

    Tags

  • 235

    Interview: Nov 8th, 2011

    Brandon Sanderson

    Watch for what happens when something leaves a bendalloy bubble.

    Footnote

    He later said "Ha, that won't make sense for about 10 books," leading many to believe this has to do with FTL travel.

    Tags

  • 236

    Interview: Nov 8th, 2011

    Brandon Sanderson

    The Lord Ruler once gave up and tried to end the Final Empire.

    Tags

  • 237

    Interview: May, 2010

    Chaos

    In the most recent Hero of Ages annotation, you said that Preservation chose Vin to be the recipient of the power, just as Preservation had chosen Alendi previously (thus, this was why Ruin had manipulated the Prophecies). Was Alendi also chosen precisely sixteen years before the Well of Ascension's power returned?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes. He was chosen exactly sixteen years before, but he was a bit older then Vin when he was chosen.

    Tags

  • 238

    Interview: May, 2010

    Chaos

    Why did the Well of Ascension refill every thousand years rather than 500 or 200, etc.?

    Brandon Sanderson

    It's actually every 1024 years. The Lord Ruler just befuddled the information a bit.

    Tags

  • 239

    Interview: May, 2010

    Chaos

    What would have happened if Ruin *did* get the atium? Yeah, the world is destroyed, but how does Ruin "absorb" the atium so he can utilize the power?

    Brandon Sanderson

    He would metabolize it, just like the normal people have to do. However, if he did get it he would then be able to destroy the world.

    Tags

  • 240

    Interview: May, 2010

    Chaos

    Why is there such an imbalance between the amount of atium and the amount of lerasium in the world? Also, why are atium and lerasium very imbalanced in Allomantic power (Lerasium is far more useful than atium, really)?

    Brandon Sanderson

    There isn't. Leras is just spread out further. He is in the mists, in the Well, and in the lerasium. Ruin's power however is considerate strictly in atium.

    Tags

  • 241

    Interview: May, 2010

    Chaos

    Since the dawn of Scadrial, why was Feruchemy isolated in a single distinct population in the world, namely the Terrismen? Allomancy, while rare within the population of Scadrial, at least was not isolated to one population, it was spread evenly, it seems. What is special about the Terrismen that only they get the power of Feruchemy? Does it have something to do with the previous Ascensions before Rashek, with the guardian keeping the power for a time?

    Brandon Sanderson

    It's all in the spiritual DNA, which is passed on like normal DNA. However, they are a separate people. They've kept themselves isolated, similar to the jews in our world. When I asked he said there have been some Feruchemical-mistings in the past, but they are very rare.

    Tags

  • 242

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Czanos

    If a Feruchemist Taps warmth, does it actually warm them up physically, or do they just feel warmer?

    Brandon Sanderson

    It actually warms them. It’s not just a feeling.

    Tags

  • 243

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Feifner

    Can Hoid travel through worlds? Or, in other words, are all of your "Hoids" one person?

    Brandon Sanderson (2009-07-08)

    Well, "Hoid" the name is an alias that a certain person is using, and he stole it from someone else. But the person named Hoid in Elantris, Mistborn, and Warbreaker are all the same individual. For the record, this is not a "name cameo." This is, indeed, the very same person.

    Tags

  • 244

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Anusien

    Why did Lord Ruler not destroy the logbook knowing what trouble Ruin could cause with it?

    Brandon Sanderson

    A few reasons. First, Ruin had his fingers in the Lord Ruler’s soul by then already. Subtle things are easier to influence. He played off the Lord Ruler’s natural nostalgia and desire to hold onto something so important to his past.

    Tags

  • 245

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    jamesgubera

    Where do you get your inspiration to create new worlds & characters?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Inspiration comes from all over. Often things I see. Color magic in Warbreaker came from watching b/w movies. The mist in Mistborn came from driving through a foggy night at 70mph. Sazed came from a Buddhist monk I met in Korea. Sarene came from a friend, Annie, who complained that she was too tall and too smart for men to want to date. If you want more, send me an email and ask for my “Ideas” essay. @PeterAhlstrom will send it to you.

    Tags

  • 246

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    Rinzi

    Are there any characters in your books who you actually DON'T like?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Does Cadsuane count? (J/K. I love you Cads. Really, don’t beat me up.) I have characters that didn’t bloom like I wanted. Parlin in Warbreaker still itches at me. Could have been done better. I always wished I could give Ham more time in Mistborn. But I can’t think of anyone I don’t like. When I write as someone, as oily as they are, I see life as them.

    Tags

  • 247

    Interview: May, 2010

    Chaos

    Does Ruin have a pool, similar to Preservation's pool with the Well of Ascension and Skai's pool in Elantris?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes. His pool is the pits.

    Footnote

    This most likely means the Pits of Hathsin.

    Tags

  • 248

    Interview: May, 2010

    Chaos

    Can Sazed "will" himself to any Shardworld if he so desires?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes, he has the capacity for it. However, will he? Don't know. If he did there would be a lot of ramifications for it...

    Tags

  • 249

    Interview: May, 2010

    Chaos

    Will Sazed eventually go mad trying to hold two Shard's power at the same time (being pushed to two different Purposes simultaneously for millennia)? Why hasn't anyone else tried this trick before in the Cosmere?

    Brandon Sanderson

    No. Since they're so opposite they work together to create a whole. However, after a LONG time it would change him as a person.

    Tags

  • 250

    Interview: May, 2010

    Chaos

    Could you tell us a chronology of the Shardworlds thus far? Like, did Warbreaker happen after Mistborn or before, things like that. Personally, I was under the impression you said Mistborn was a sequel to Elantris, but Mi'ch and Josh disagree.

    Brandon Sanderson

    He wasn't positive on where Warbreaker went, but Elantris is first and MB is after it.

    Footnote

    It is commonly believed that until Alloy of Law, the books were published in chronological order.

    Tags

  • 251

    Interview: May, 2010

    Chaos

    Can Inquisitors still breed through human reproductive methods?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes

    Tags

  • 252

    Interview: May, 2010

    Chaos

    Why did Rashek create mistwraiths the way that he did?

    Brandon Sanderson

    He wasn't sure what you meant by this, but he was sure that the annotations would cover what you wanted to know.

    Tags

  • 253

    Interview: May, 2010

    Chaos

    How long is the lifespan of an Inquisitor?

    Brandon Sanderson

    It depends on the powers they're given. Some burn up quickly, and others are extended. In general though they do tend to have slightly longer lives. Since Marsh has the missing bag of atiums he's going to be around for a while.

    Tags

  • 254

    Interview: May, 2010

    Chaos

    Does being female alter the spiritual overlays on a person, so that a Hemalurgically imbued spike would need to be placed differently than in a male body?

    Brandon Sanderson

    No. In fact, there are female inquisitors in the huge fight when Vin goes blasting through them, but he felt like bringing that out would have been distracting.

    Tags

  • 255

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    pmrbluepat

    Any movie deals on the horizon?... I would particularly like to see Warbreaker.

    Brandon Sanderson

    I have movies in the works for both Mistborn and Alcatraz.

    Tags

  • 256

    Interview: Jul, 2009

    yagiz

    Which one comes first? The story or the setting (world, races, magic sys, etc) or do they emerge together?

    Brandon Sanderson

    It depends on the book. For Mistborn, setting was first. For Warbreaker, characters. It’s very hard to pinpoint, though, since I don’t start writing until I’ve developed all three.

    Tags

  • 257

    Interview: May, 2010

    Chaos

    In the future when atium is rare again and we have a good Table of Allomantic Metals, which metal steals Allomantic Temporal powers?

    Brandon Sanderson

    It will be on the table when Brandon brings them out. Feruchemy is the next poster to come out. Until then RAFO.

    Tags

  • 258

    Interview: May, 2010

    Chaos

    Can Hemalurgy be used to steal magic attributes from any Shardworld?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Hemalurgy has larger ramifications then just Scadrial. That's about all he'd say.

    Footnote

    This seems to be similar to what is said in the Ars Arcanum in Alloy of Law

    Tags

  • 259

    Interview: May, 2010

    Chaos

    Does atium have a "side effect", much like how lerasium has a "side effect" in creating Mistborn?

    Brandon Sanderson

    RAFO

    Tags

  • 260

    Interview: May, 2010

    Chaos

    What do you call mixing Allomantic powers with Feruchemical powers? Allochemy?

    Brandon Sanderson

    He hasn't decided yet.

    Footnote

    He has now. People with the ability to burn both allomantic and feruchemical metals are called Twinborns.

    Tags

  • 261

    Interview: Dec 19th, 2011

    Brandon Sanderson

    The biggest news for this week is that the long-awaited Mistborn Adventure Game tabletop RPG from Crafty Games is now available in ebook form. The hardcover and paperback copies will come next month or so, and we are planning a local release party for those once we have more details on the exact date. Anyway, I do hope to be able to share more thoughts on the exciting release of this game once I can take a breather from writing A Memory of Light (that deadline is coming up fast, and I'm very hard at work on it).

    Tags

  • 262

    Interview: Mar 19th, 2011

    Vericon Report - Puck (Paraphrased)

    Puck

    I recorded the entire session and, should we get approval to post it (I could understand if Peter would rather we didn't), I'll upload it here. Until then (or instead of that, should we get a "no") here are some details that I recalled on the ride home (no cheating, Peter. I promise!)

    Brandon Sanderson

    - We deal with a bendalloy (Allomantic)/gold (Feruchemical) Twinborn in addition to Wax's steel/iron combo
    - The nickname for a iron Feruchemist is a "Slider"
    - A nickname for Sazed is "Harmony" (I think)
    - The events in the first trilogy have spawned 2 religions: Survivorism (der) and Pathism (followers of Sazed, unless I completely misread things)
    - Bendalloy has some very interesting rules/restrictions: once a time bubble is created, it cannot be moved; I had always thought it would follow the misting around as they moved) entering/exiting a time bubble has some interesting effects. You can't shoot out of it, because objects entering/leaving the bendalloy bubble (especially those at high velocity) have some strange kind of conservation-of-energy-like effect, where they gain some kind of spin and ricochet in a different direction. I can't help but extrapolate what this means for individuals trying to enter/leave the stationary bubble. Maybe if it's done slowly (like with a shield in Dune), it's OK. We'll have to theorize on that until the novel comes out.
    - [This one might already be known, but it sounded new to me] The third Mistborn trilogy will be sci-fi, involving space travel. Crossovers, anyone? This might be the beginning of the final stage of Unity

    Footnote

    The name for an Iron Feruchemist (store weight) is actually a Skimmer. A Slider is an Allomantic Bendalloy burner (speed up time in bubble).

    Tags

  • 263

    Interview: Mar 19th, 2011

    Vericon Report - Puck (Paraphrased)

    Puck

    "How is a Splinter different from a Sliver?

    Brandon Sanderson

    "Let me see... You have met splinters in Elantris, Warbreaker, and in Way of Kings. You have not met them in Mistborn."

    PUCK

    "I feel like we know that. So, qualitatively, what's the difference?"

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    "Qualitatively, they're reverses of one another. A Sliver is a human intelligence who has held the power and released it. A Splinter has never been human."

    PUCK

    "But it derives from a Shard's power."

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    "Yes. That's not it completely, but there's at least something to think about."

    Tags

  • 264

    Interview: May 31st, 2011

    Thorondir

    How could a person from Scadrial access Shadesmar? An alloy of a god metal?

    Brandon Sanderson

    He RAFOd me on this one and said it was a plot point for future novels.

    Tags

  • 265

    Interview: Jun 1st, 2011

    Ashley Cowles

    I do remember some things, but the majority of the questions were about WoT.

    Brandon Sanderson

    He said that all of his own books take place in the same universe, but not on the same world per se. The overall magic system was based on the principle of investing, i.e. people and things are invested by magic. So for example in Mistborn, the metals themselves aren't magical, but they become a vessel for the magic.

    Also he said that the ways of magic are different. In Mistborn it's genetic (or through ingesting atium, but he didn't talk about that). In Warbreaker it has to do with gathering other people's Breath, etc.

    Tags

  • 266

    Interview: Nov 14th, 2011

    CorbyCampbell (14 November 2011)

    Your side characters often have physical infirmities. Can you explain why?

    Brandon Sanderson (14 November 2011)

    I feel that often, fiction tends to gloss over or ignore people like Clubs. So I find myself sticking them in.

    Tags

  • 267

    Interview: Nov 14th, 2011

    ericpeters (14 November 2011)

    You mentioned friday night in #Seattle Allomacy has "FTL" built into it, any more hints you can share on how that would work

    Brandon Sanderson (14 November 2011)

    It involves where the lost energy from thermodynamic issues goes in certain Allomantic interactions.

    Tags

  • 268

    Interview: Nov 14th, 2011

    tritlo (14 November 2011)

    Another question, do you think you'll eventually publish a "The World of Brandon Sanderson's Cosmere"?

    Brandon Sanderson (14 November 2011)

    Probably. Though first, we'd probably do The Way of Kings and Mistborn worldbooks.

    Tags

  • 269

    Interview: Nov 14th, 2011

    ericpeters (14 November 2011)

    What exactly is a dueling cane anyhow?

    Brandon Sanderson (14 November 2011)

    Depends. Some are flexible, like sparring swords, and are used for duels where blood is not needed.

    Others are basically a big length of wood for hitting people, like a tonfa without the grip.

    ERICPETERS

    Do canes have a hilt like a sparring sword then? I always picture something like pic being used

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Many have a hilt. However for most, there is no crossguard or the like.

    And most don't taper like that one. They are often of a uniform diameter all the way down.

    Tags

  • 270

    Interview: Nov 14th, 2011

    Shadowsofink (14 November 2011)

    Complex "magic" system in Mistborn, and the complex one in Elantris; what base ideas do you build from for this?

    Brandon Sanderson (Mon Nov 14)

    For Mistborn, Alchemy and biological metabolism. For Elantris, Chinese linguistics and geometry mixed.

    Tags

  • 271

    Interview: Nov 14th, 2011

    irotin (14 November 2011)

    Kel said he ended atium production for a few hundred years. Will atium reappear in Alloy and such, or did Sazed move the Pits?

    Brandon Sanderson (Mon Nov 14)

    RAFO. :)

    Tags

  • 272

    Interview: Nov 14th, 2011

    Fyodor32768 (14 November 2011)

    In Alloy of Law are people still Snapping?

    Brandon Sanderson (14 November 2011)

    Sazed chose to alter the way Snapping works. It bothered him. It does happen, but differently.

    Tags

  • 273

    Interview: Nov 14th, 2011

    Frodor32768 (14 November 2011)

    it seems that The Lord Ruler still needed to store age "normally" but less. Did Miles ever have to store healing?

    Brandon Sanderson (14 November 2011)

    Yes. He did, but not in the normal way.

    Tags

  • 274

    Interview: Nov 14th, 2011

    CorbyCampbell (14 November 2011)

    'IronEyes' at the end of Alloy of Law is actually Marsh? It could be any kandra could it not?

    Brandon Sanderson (14 November 2011)

    It could be a kandra, but I will tell you specifically that this time it is not. It is him.

    Tags

  • 275

    Interview: Nov 19th, 2011

    Fejicus

    What would happen if you burned Duralumin and Bendalloy?

    Brandon Sanderson

    He gave us a big RAFO, and i think hinted at that it was going to play a part in future books, so its going to be important.

    Tags

  • 276

    Interview: Nov 19th, 2011

    Fejicus

    At the end of Alloy of Law, Marsh tells Marasi, that Wax is doing "his brothers work". Does this mean Kelsier is still meddling, or is this a continuation of his initial legacy?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Kelsier has never been good at doing what he's told. He's still interfering.

    Tags

  • 277

    Interview: Nov 19th, 2011

    Fejicus

    The Stormlight Archive is going to be in two 5-book arcs; will there be a big gap between these (story time wise)?

    Brandon Sanderson

    He said there would be a small gap, nothing as big as Mistborn and Alloy of Law, but it would be there.

    Tags

  • 278

    Interview: Nov 19th, 2011

    Fejicus

    Is the size of speed bubbles affected by the strength of the allomancer?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes.

    Tags

  • 279

    Interview: Nov 19th, 2011

    Fejicus

    Is Officer Brettin Tensoon at the end of the book?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes. (He let on during the signing that TenSoon made an appearance, and my friend Joe guessed it was Brettin, and Brandon confirmed it then later to us)

    Tags

  • 280

    Interview: Nov 19th, 2011

    Fejicus

    Oh, and another little tidbit,

    Brandon Sanderson

    The person who gave Wax his earring was the kandra, MeLaan.

    Also, that Kandra are working as "Sazed's Angels". And their role is primarily to go along fixing things by Sazed's Will. Brettin was killed towards the end of the book, but not in the storyline related plot. Sazed saw this, and told Tensoon to go get his bones, which is why he wasnt able to imitate him properly.

    Tags

  • 281

    Interview: Nov 19th, 2011

    Fejicus

    The person who wrote the Ars Arcanum in Alloy of Law, is that the same person who wrote the Letter in Way of Kings.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Its not confirmed, but it's either Hoid, or someone in the 17th Shard. (However, thinking back, I'm not sure if he fully heard/understood the question, and perhaps he was expecting it to be something else. But it seems to me that if he namedropped Hoid, that he may have misunderstood the question, as it seems very likely that Hoid wrote the Letter, I dont think he'd let something slip like that. So i would count this information as rather tenuous.)

    Tags

  • 282

    Interview: Nov 12th, 2011

    zxg15

    One person asked what metal Wax's earring was made of.

    Brandon Sanderson

    He wouldn't say which metal, however he did confirm that it does have a "slight hemalurgic charge".

    Tags

  • 283

    Interview: Jan, 2012

    Schocksrage (Reddit.com)

    The Alloy of Law left me wanting more books in the universe right away. Any hints as to when we might get to see the next trilogy?

    Brandon Sanderson (Reddit.com)

    My current plan is to hold out on the second trilogy until I've reached a breaking point in the Stormlight Archive. (So after book five.) My reasoning is that the second trilogy is very involved, and I'm not certain if I want two thick-booked series going at once. There is a good chance I'll return and do another shorter book, like this one, in the world before then. Either about Wax, or perhaps a quick glimpse of the southern continent.

    MORGHUS (REDDIT.com)

    That's awesome! I really enjoyed both worlds, but right now the Stormlight Archive is the one that got me totally hooked. How was the reception for the first Stormlight compared to Alloy of Law? :)

    BRANDON SANDERSON (REDDIT.com)

    I would say the reception is about what I hoped. The Way of Kings has made much more of an impact, as I would hope would be the case. A book that is the result of many years of effort compared to a fun diversion...well, I would be worried if Alloy of Law had been the one everyone latched onto.

    That said, I've been very pleased with the reception to Alloy of Law. The sales are strong, and most people seem to be enjoying it for what it is rather than expecting it to be something it is not.

    Tags

  • 284

    Interview: Jan, 2012

    Ace_of_Face (Reddit.com)

    Who wrote the "Ars Arcanum"? Since the writer obviously had knowledge of the Cosmere I assumed that it was you making an editorial note, but then I thought that it could be Hoid (who was suspiciously absent) or Sazed or any Shardbearer... Does that make sense at all?

    Brandon Sanderson (Reddit.com)

    The Ars Arcanum is written in-cosmere by someone, but I don't want to saw who yet.

    Footnote

    Hoid is indeed in Alloy of Law. He's the beggar in black that is at the wedding in chapter 5.

    Tags

  • 285

    Interview: Jan, 2012

    Ace_of_Faith (Reddit.com)

    Not really a question, but the one thing that disappointed me was that you didn't come up with new slang names for Allomancers! After three hundred years, do you really think they would still be calling steel mistings "coinshots"?

    Anyway, thanks for doing this and keep up the good work.

    Brandon Sanderson (Reddit.com)

    I toyed with this one, but decided that I would keep them the same for a few reasons. First off, I felt that certain things in-world would hamper some linquistic diversity. (Having the books Sazed left behind as a guide to Allomancy and history, everyone living in a small geographic area, the semi-religious nature of Allomancy making people look at it in traditional ways.) So, while I advanced the slang of the world, some of the terms I decided to leave the same.

    Another reason for this came when I was writing the book. At first, I experimented with greater linguistic diversity—I even tried a vowel shift, as I figured three hundred years might be enough for that. In the end, I pulled back. I was already worried that this book not feel "Mistborn" enough, and so I wanted some direct ties back to the original series. Fiddling too much with the language while changing the setting and characters so drastically felt like a mistake to me.

    Tags

  • 286

    Interview: Jan, 2012

    zas678 (Reddit.com)

    Is it significant that Miles said that the "men of gold and red" would come and rule? Is there a connection between this and the "gold and red" cigar box that Miles keeps The Suit's comings and goings on?

    Brandon Sanderson (Reddit.com)

    This is all very significant.

    Tags

  • 287

    Interview: Jan, 2012

    zas678 (Reddit.com)

    How long before Way of Kings is Alloy of Law? I heard somewhere that it's a hundred years, but I don't think that's right.

    Brandon Sanderson (Reddit.com)

    I intended them to be happening roughly close to one another, with Way of Kings slightly before.

    Footnote

    This is in conflict with earlier reports, so it was confirmed

    Tags

  • 288

    Interview: Jul 2nd, 2011

    Marc Aplin

    Right, so Brandon's new novel is soon to be released, and it's obviously another Mistborn novel—it's a standalone. And we wanted to know, what can we expect?

    Brandon Sanderson

    That's Alloy of Law. Alloy of Law takes place several hundred years following the events of Hero of Ages. This was always the plan with the Mistborn series; I pitched it to my editor as a sequence of series set in the same world with an evolution of technology, which is not something I'd seen done very much in fantasy books—letting the technology process and seeing how magic interacts with it. Alloy of Law is the story of a man named Waxillium who has spent the last twenty years living out in the Roughs being a lawman. And his uncle dies, and we find out that Waxillium is actually the heir to his house. And back in the city of Elendel, they've got this sort of half lordship, half elected body that leads the government, and he has inherited a seat in this body and responsibility for thousands of people who work in his house. And so he has to leave the life of a lawman and come back to the city—which is patterned after 1910 New York—and live among, you know, the elite of the city. And yet he's kind of an unpolished sort of guy, having been out in the Roughs all this time. And it's his story, trying to make sense of this world. It's also a mystery; it's a very fast-paced sort of mystery, kind of... Imagine it this way, as I have been describing it lately. Imagine the Sherlock Holmes story. Now replace Sherlock Holmes with Clint Eastwood and add magic. And that's what you've got.

    Marc Aplin

    Excellent.

    Tags

  • 289

    Interview: Jul 2nd, 2011

    Marc Aplin

    Okay, I'll go on to the next question. In January 2010 it was, you said that a Mistborn film had been optioned. There was also a game in progress. What's the state of this, I know a lot of people were excited to hear about it.

    Brandon Sanderson

    The Mistborn RPG game is a go, for sure. We've got cover art, they're trying to release it by GenCon—which is a big gaming convention this year—and have it available for purchase by fall. It is certainly happening; it's 100% now. The film—the producers have finished the screenplay, which is quite good; I'm very pleased with it. And they are pitching the film in Hollywood right now. We don't know what will happen, what will come of it, but they are pitching it in Hollywood right now.

    Tags

  • 290

    Interview: Jul 2nd, 2011

    Marc Aplin

    So, Mistborn, as you said, was originally planned, and I think still is, a trilogy of trilogies, and also you've got the Stormlight at the moment that you say is one to watch. Can you give us any insight to what's to come in the future, and is it in some ways hard to let go of the original trilogy? I know you've done the standalone, but then to really move on.

    Brandon Sanderson

    Letting go of the original trilogy will be kind of hard. But in some ways, it'll have to. Because the original trilogy has become the mythology and lore of the world, which is really fun to work with as a writer. Beyond that, there are continuing characters. There was always planned to be continuing characters. I can't say much without giving spoilers, but there are characters from the original trilogy appearing in this book, several of them. Some of them are hidden. You're going to have to search and figure out who's who. Some of them are less hidden.

    In the future, the second trilogy's going to be one that deals with a... By this point, in the world—and Alloy of Law is the same case—there are no Mistborn anymore. There are only Mistings, for various reasons that I don't want to give spoilers on, but there are Mistings. The second trilogy happens in a modern setting when we get to that. Alloy of Law is in an industrial setting. In the modern setting, there we will be doing a story eventually about a Mistborn serial killer and a SWAT team of Allomancers who... We're talking people with machine guns and, you know, Navy SEAL Allomancers whose job it is to hunt down Allomancer criminals, and then they'll reveal something, um...unexpected, how about that.

    Marc Aplin

    Right.

    Tags

  • 291

    Interview: Jan, 2012

    zas678 (reddit.com)

    Why on earth does Marsh have a Feruchemical Atium Spike? You've said that Ironeyes is in fact Marsh. Did Ruin spike someone for him? Or did Sazed grant him the power?

    Brandon Sanderson (reddit.com)

    Dead inquisitors Vin killed. Some were granted the spike for reasons I haven't spoken of yet.

    Tags

  • 292

    Interview: Jan, 2012

    zas678 (reddit.com)

    A little safer question- Why did you not have Waxillium fall for Marasi? Why stick with the contract with Steris?

    Brandon Sanderson (reddit.com)

    Marasi, as she was in Alloy of Law, was just plain wrong for Wax. As I write books, I allow my characters to grow more free-form (while my setting and plot are outlined in detail.) In writing the book, I felt that a Marasi hook-up at the end would not only be wrong for the character, but wrong for the story. If I do direct sequels (which I probably will) perhaps things will change.

    Tags

  • 293

    Interview: Jan, 2012

    zas678 (Reddit.com)

    TenSoon wonders, and I wonder too- How can Kandra think and be sentient without Brains? Doesn't the body need a physical coordinator to relay between the Physical and Cognitive realm? Or do the spikes do a good enough job with that?

    Brandon Sanderson (Reddit.com)

    I imagine Kandra having a non-centralized nervous system, with brain power spread through their bodies. Well, non-centralized is probably the wrong way to say it. They have lobes of thought and memory attached to muscles here and there, and don't have a single 'brain.' They certainly have brain-like material, though.

    Tags

  • 294

    Interview: Jan, 2012

    zas678 (Reddit.com)

    You've said that Inquisitors could have children. Would those children have a better chance at being Allomancers compared to if they had the kids before they were Inquisitors?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Yes, but there also could be...complications.

    Tags

  • 295

    Interview: Jan, 2012

    zas678 (Reddit.com)

    I almost forgot! If you burn Nicrosil, will it deplete Feruchemial Storages? Or just Allomantic?

    Brandon Sanderson (Reddit.com)

    Just Allomantic.

    Tags

  • 296

    Interview: Jan, 2012

    Darkless (Reddit.com)

    I have my own theory but I thought I should ask, if the koloss reproduce through hemalurgic spike's how can there be half koloss in Alloy of law.

    Brandon Sanderson (Reddit.com)

    I am holding this answer back for future books, I'm afraid. I have said some things, but the full truth is still subject to debate. I will answer this eventually in the books.

    Tags

  • 297

    Interview: Jan, 2012

    zas678 (Reddit.com)

    I dislike double posting, but I have one question that came up recently from your tweet. You said that there are "multiple" people from Mistborn in WoK. Does this include Hoid?

    Brandon Sanderson (Reddit.com)

    Yes, it does.

    CORWIN01

    Are they just vague allusions?

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Vague, no. But I wouldn't say they, save Hoid, have any important impact on the events of the book.

    Tags

  • 298

    Interview: Jan, 2012

    OremLK (Reddit.com)

    Was there something in particular which made you want to revisit the Mistborn universe after the first trilogy?

    Brandon Sanderson (Reddit.com)

    It was the original concept for the Mistborn series, in which I pitched a fantasy world that progressed drastically in technology through its lifetime, with the magic as a common thread. I felt that revisiting the world in a more modern world would provide unique ways to explore storytelling.

    Tags

  • 299

    Interview: Jan, 2012

    RedRiotRoses (Reddit.com)

    What would it take for me to successfully bribe you into writing a sequel to Alloy? I think you may have answered this one before, but where do you come up with your names for all your characters? Thank you! I really love your work.

    Brandon Sanderson (Reddit.com)

    I will probably do one anyway.

    It depends on the series. For Mistborn, I build a 'feel for certain regions and develop names using the linguistic rules of that region. The Central Dominance (and Elendel in this book) had a slightly French feel to the linguistics, and many of the names came from that paradigm.

    However, unique to the Mistborn world was the need to give people simple nicknames in a thieving crew sort of way. Wax, Clubs, Breeze, Mr. Suit, all of these are along those lines.

    Tags

  • 300

    Interview: Jan, 2012

    Hippodrome (Reddit.com)

    I'm not sure how free we are around here with spoilers regarding the Mistborn trilogy, so I'll try my best to avoid anything that will get me strung up.

    The Mistborn trilogy left everything on the table, so to speak, with regards to the validity of a particular religion and its deitie(s). I worried the final scenario left no room for other religions to manifest in that world thereafter, and yet here we have Alloy of Law, which involved a few different religions (some of which we -the readers- know to be false) and somehow it seemed to work. My questions are:

    1.What were some general challenges that you had to deal with when establishing the religious backdrop of the story?

    2.Though you include brief examples of interaction with a deity in the novel, can you further explain some of the limits of that deity's ability to interact with the world in which the story takes place? The brief explanation in the novel seemed rushed. Then again, there didn't seem to be room for much philosophical debate during the awesome actions scenes.

    Thank you for taking the time out of your day to deal with questions like these.

    Brandon Sanderson (Reddit.com)

    You covered the biggest challenge. However, you have to remember that as a religious person, I do believe in God in our world--and we have a ton of religions, many of which are related and interpreting the same concepts and scriptures in many different ways.

    As for this deity, you're right--this book didn't have the space for a lot of philosophy. However, I can get into it a little bit here. He does not interact partially because of his innate nature, which allows him to see many different sides of a lot of different debates and activities. On the other hand, I am a firm believer that the nature of free will demands people to actually be given opportunities to make decisions. Stopping them just before, ala Minority Report, doesn't cut it for me. So, the deity in question feels he must be very careful about direct involvement, instead letting people act and react--and letting choices be made.

    That said, I want him to be involved. Just more in a "I give people the tools they need to accomplish goodness," rather than "I'll just step in and make sure everyone does everything right."

    Tags

  • 301

    Interview: Jan, 2012

    audiofreedom (Reddit.com)

    I was just rambling on r/WoT about how awesome you are but yeah. Awesome.

    Will there be a sequel to Alloy of Law? It felt like there would be but I want to know for sure lol

    Are Allomancer more or less common than in the time of the survivor?

    Brandon Sanderson (Reddit.com)

    First one: Yes, most likely.

    Second one: They are more common, but slightly less powerful.

    Tags

  • 302

    Interview: Jan, 2012

    dancewithsmurfs (Reddit.com)

    I was a little confused about how this book ties in with the other Mistborn books that you have planned. Wikipedia states that you're planning a "trilogy of trilogies" and that Alloy is a stand alone novel. I thought it was odd that it ended with something of a cliffhanger. Can you tell us then... Can we expect to see these characters again someday? Or is it the mystery/conspiracy aspect that will carry over to future books? Both maybe?

    Thanks so much for the stories! Any nibbling from Hollywood for adaptations yet? It's not often that you find a good story that has both a compelling plot and interesting action to go with it. I think a Mistborn movie would be quite a sight to see. :)

    Brandon Sanderson (Reddit.com)

    I do plan to do more Wax and Wayne. The second trilogy is very involved, and I don't think will be a good balance to the Stormlight books. However, I don't want to leave Mistborn alone, as I have so many plans for the rest of the series. Therefore, I decided some smaller novels like this one would be appropriate while the majority of my attention is on the Stormlight Archive.

    The Mistborn film is trudging along, bit by bit. The latest screenplay should come to me in the next month or so. We have a shot, but it's still a slim one. More than nibbles (I've sold rights to some producers) but no studio involvement or major talent attached quite yet.

    Tags

  • 303

    Interview: Jan, 2012

    midwestredditor (Reddit.com)

    Of course these are going to be spoiler-tastic.

    How are there kandra and koloss? Kandra especially, since they did their "mass suicide" thing at the end of the original trilogy.

    Brandon Sanderson (Reddit.com)

    The nice thing about the kandra for me in the narrative was that, though removing their spikes turns them feral, you can always stick those spikes back in. TenSoon feared that this was the end of his people, and it could have been, if those spikes hadn't gone back in quickly. As it was, there were costs. Time spent without spikes causes a kandra's memories to deteriorate, and some that were left a relatively long time were essentially reborn as new people. But the race survived, even if it is unlikely that their numbers will be added to.

    MIDWESTREDDITOR

    Thank you very much for answering my questions!

    If I may be allowed a follow-up question: Did TenSoon survive, then (as the TenSoon who experienced growth under Vin)?

    (If it's not spoiler-tastic to the series, this is something I might share with my fiancee. TenSoon was one of her favorite characters. You, uh, kinda killed most of her favorites.)

    BRANDON SANDERSON

    Yes, though he did lose some things.

    Tags

  • 304

    Interview: Jan, 2012

    midwestredditor (Reddit.com)

    How did you channel that much snark and oddball humor for Wayne without going a little crazy?

    Brandon Sanderson (Reddit.com)

    Characters like him actually provide a snark outlet for me, so that it can be very cathartic to write them.

    Tags

  • 305

    Interview: Jan, 2012

    som1else (Reddit.com)

    So the number 16 is importanton Scadrial, on pg 245, Wax is trying to find out where Miles is going to be next and he writes down the number "35.17" I couldn't help but notice that the 3+5+1+7=16, was that intentional or am I seeing things that aren't really there?

    Brandon Sanderson (Reddit.com)

    I slip it in here and there for fun, but it isn't actually important. It is fun when people notice it, though.

    Tags

  • 306

    Interview: 2012

    eridius (Thu Jan 19)

    Wait, are Mistborn and Stormlight Archive somehow connected?

    Brandon Sanderson (Thu Jan 19)

    Multiple people from Mistborn appeared in The Way of Kings.

    Footnote

    "Multiple people" includes Hoid.

    Alloy of Law Reddit Q&A

    Tags

  • 307

    Interview: 2012

    Brandon Sanderson (Thu Jan 19)

    Right now, taking a (short) break from the WoT rewrite to spend an evening working on the Mistborn video game script.

    Allison Hagen

    XBox? PC?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Both.

    QRevolution

    I don't suppose you can tell us who's developing it yet, can you?

    Brandon Sanderson

    Afraid I'm not allowed to say yet.

    Abel Silva

    Is Epic games developing? Is this how they got you to write the Infinity Blade novella?

    Brandon Sanderson

    I hope to do some projects with Epic in the future, but they are not doing this one.

    Part of why I took that project, however, was to get more experience with video game storytelling and plotting.

    Electrik Viking

    Really looking forward to Mistborn game will it be xbox, do you get to be Kel?

    Brandon Sanderson

    It's set hundreds of years before the first book.

    Minimana93

    hello I've read Elantris and Mistborn (best books ever!) May I ask when the video game is planned to be released? Thanks

    Brandon Sanderson

    Summer/Fall 2013, I think.

    Tags

  • 308

    Interview: 2012

    zas678 (Mon Feb 20)

    We have conflicting reports on chronology. Is this right, or is this right?

    Brandon Sanderson (Mon Feb 20)

    The second. I revised my placement of KINGS relative to HERO after realizing a behind-the-scenes conflict.

    ALLOY had to happen after KINGS for Cosmere reasons. I had two timelines arguing, and in plotting Stormlight 2, I fixed this.

    Tags

  • 309

    Interview: 2012

    Brandon Sanderson (19 January 2012)

    Right now, taking